The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode 100 · 6 months ago

100 Weeks of Podcasting: The Business Impact

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this milestone 100th episode, the hosting tables are turned. Joe Sullivan is interviewed by Logan Lyles of Sweet Fish Media about his learnings from 100 consecutive weeks of podcasting and six ways it’s impacted his business. 

Joe Sullivan, Founder of Gorilla76, opens up about why he originally wanted to start a podcast and how he made the transition from creating mostly written content to fueling an entire content program. Joe reflects on the six most impactful outcomes, and shares his advice for overcoming imposter syndrome, getting started, and building meaningful business relationships.  

Join us as we discuss:

  • How to create and repurpose content with consistency
  • The meaningful path toward thought leadership
  • How to thoughtfully humanize your brand
  • How to measure the impact of your podcast

I have learned so much about manufacturing from doing a hundred episodes that I mean I just I understand my audience so much better than I ever could have without having done this. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving midsize manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B tob sales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast on logging lyles with sweet fish. I'm your guest host for a very special episode today. I am honored to join Joe Today for episode one hundred of the Manufacturing Executive Joe and I have known each other for several years, a little bit before this podcast started. Joe, how's it going today? How you feeling about being on the other side of the MIC for episode one hundred? I'm a little nervous, honestly. It's I usually don't get nervous for my podcast episodes, but now that somebody's interviewing me, but I'm also really excited. This is a really cool milestone. I try not to Brag much in my business, but I am going to brag about the fact that, you know, we're a hundred episodes in and we have and missed a week and it's a it's a it's a cool milestone to hit and excited to be doing this with you. Is the think literally the first person I talked to you professionally in a serious way about launching a podcast. It's kind of fun to come back full circle here. Yeah, I we've had this on the calendar for I think about a month now and I've really been looking forward to it and to me it felt very much the same way, like this is such a natural thing you and I, as I mentioned it, they open started talking when you guys were exploring the idea of doing a podcast. At girl is seventy six. You guys had done some some podcasting with a few clients here and there, and as you guys were thinking about it, we had some conversations and even from there talked about a few different ways you guys might approach podcasting. So why don't you take us back there to what was kind of some of your mindset initially with why a podcast? What were some of your initial goals and thoughts and the things that you were thinking through? And then, I know we're obviously going to get to some of the impact in the business and how you think that translates to manufacturing companies, because there are some differences right between your agency and manufacturing companies listening to this talking about podcasting, and we won't. We want it to be valuable for those listeners, but I think that walking through some of your thinking initially when you first started exploring podcasting would really set the stage. Well, yeah, for sure. So thinking back to I think it was like early two thousand and twenty, like January or February maybe, when we first talked, I can't remember exactly, but my thought process, tess originally was okay, over the last two years I had written I think fiftyzero words of content or something like that. It's like I've always been a gorilla on my business been in we've been around for now almost sixteen years, but like over the last decade, like we've been really committed to content marketing and it's a lot of what we do for our clients and so practicing what we preach. I have produced a lot of content, but it's been almost exclusively written, a little bit of video stuff here and there and until a few years ago. But and so my original thought process was like, okay, well, this podcasting medium is clearly growing quickly. I I've already got all this content, like I've written all this stuff and you know, at least the more recent stuff was I felt pretty good about. And my thought press originally was, you know, it would be really cool if I could start translating this into another medium. And so I originally thought, okay, what if we what if we explored this podcasting thing and we picked out ten topics and I envisioned kind of, you know, Solo cast type of episodes...

...at first, with me just talking or or maybe, you know, some interviews with other marketing people and doing something that is really about marketing advice or manufacturers and and that's where my head was originally, and it was in my conversations with you guys and frankly, probably what won me over when to tire you guys. It's sweetfish. So I have plenty of good things to say about by the way, but remember talking to you and and Sanchez on your team, and you guys push me in the direction to not, instead of just doing more content like the written stuff I'm doing, where it's really my expertise, for manufacturers, you said, we what you really should do is you should create a show that is a sort of growth resource for manufacturing leaders, the people we want to talk to, and make it a resource for them from a variety of perspectives, so that I can go talk to manufacturing leaders and build that are the peers of my audience, and let them share stories and be a resource to to their peers, and it'll help open the door to conversations with people I otherwise probably would never talk to. It would be great market research for me. I we're going to get into all that kind of stuff later, but that's kind of where my head was that and that's what really want me over when I started thinking about this differently. It's not just me spewing what's on my brain, it's how can I go create an audio based resource for manufacturing leaders that will help them for from a variety of perspectives, from, you know, in terms of growing their business? Yeah, absolutely. I I love how you just basically defined what we call content based networking here at sweet fish. Right. It is all the same things that you would do with regular content marketing, but in it involves some networking and some relationship building and it makes your content better in some ways, right, because obviously you guys have been working in the manufacturing space, you have a point of view, you've put out thought leadership in your written content in your blog, and you you mentioned crazy amount of content that you guys have created there. You can still do that in the podcast. I know you've woven in some solo episodes from your point of view and I think that that is important with the podcast. But don't kind of step over the opportunity to feature the people in your market, right, because it does two things. It opens up those direct one to one relationships. So if you were a Bab brand, you're not trying to reach a massive audience like a Tim Ferris or Gary v or someone like that. You have a a narrow audience that still is sizeable, right, but you know who those people are, you know what the titles are, you know what the company types are, you probably know what the company names are and in a lot of cases, and so if your podcast is both a mixture of your point of view and your thought leadership, as well as featuring people in the industry. Then you get to go talk to those people in the industry and you're helping your listeners hear from people in the industry that they might not otherwise, especially over the last two years when there wasn't a lot of live events and conferences where they couldn't go and kind of rub shoulders and ask questions. What are you guys doing about this? I haven't done this. What do you think about this software platform? Right, you could be that facilitator, right. So I love that you approached podcasting with both of those things in mind. Let's talk a little bit about you know, how you guys initially started to measure the impact, like Hey, okay, we chose our strategy where podcasting. What are we measuring and what have been some of those measurements? As you look at a hundred episodes in what's been the financial impact for grow seventy six yeah, for sure. So you know, I remember when we we kick this thing off with you guys and we had sort of a kickoff call and you know, one of your people sort it did a an interview with me to just figure out, like what what are my goals? What am I trying to achieve here, and make sure you guys could do the best job you could serve in us as our podcast producer. And I remember saying specifically, you know, if I don't, if I can never tie a dollar of...

...revenue to this, I don't really care. My my purpose here is to further embed our company and me in the manufacturing sector, to meet people that are going to be influential in my career and for my business, you know, build those connections, to have a source of content, just another stream of content that we can use in our own marketing, and I just knew that it would, if we did this and committed to it and did it well, that it would have, you know, whether directly or indirectly, you would have a positive impact on our business. Now I'm I here, I am basically two years in, hundred straight weeks of episodes, and I'm there are sort of six things that I've identified that I think are the most impactful things, and I'm going to start with the financial impactcause I've probably what people care about the most that are listening right now, and so I can tell you that I can trace over or were three hundred thou in closed business directly attributable to the PODCAST. Now, attributing revenue of marketing, attribution is is a kind of hairy thing that we it's there's so many things that go into it, but what I can tell you is that there are there are two big clients of ours that in one of them came from a guess that I had on the show in the first fifteen episodes or so. became a referral source. I met her on the show when I invited her on and she referred me to another company and they, you know, closed as a big client for us down the road, and then another one. It was literally hate my CFL listens to your show every week and said we need to talk to you and and before long we were off to the races right and so so there are two sizeable, good fit clients that came directly from this, and that's the only the stuff that's attributable, because I get comments all the time. I send episodes to people after sales calls and say hey, I talked about this with this person, you know, fifty episodes ago, and I send them that piece of content and I know that that plays a role. It just further, you know, adds credibility, helps help them understand my perspective on something or just being a facilitator of that conversation I think lends some credibility. So so is that. And then the other thing is I for you know, the last couple months. I have a sponsor now too, and and so there's passive income coming in that goes straight to our bottom line. It's it requires me to do about one hour of extra work and there's a, you know, monthly check coming in, and so that's something we're think about too now, is we'll what what should we be doing with media properties in our agency, because it's a and frankly, we're marketing agency. We think that way, but could be that way for you too. It could be another stream of a income for anybody listening right now if you can do this right and with consistency. So that's kind of the first one. I'll stop there for a second. That is is that that's I've had a very clear financial impact directly attributable to this this show. Yeah, and going back to what we were saying earlier with the content based networking strategy, two of your most attributable deals coming from the podcast strategy. One was the guest relationship, right, that led to a referral, and the other was a listener. So by taking this approach, you've actually been able to see both sides of the coin. Yep, right, and I think that that's where, in Btb you have an opportunity to use a podcast with both of these equally impactful opportunities for financial impact from the podcast simultaneously. Right. So let's give people a little bit of a taste. Give us just kind of the quick rundown. So the first was, you know, direct financial impact to revenue. What's too through six on the list? Before we dive into each one, just give us the highlights. A two through six show. Yeah, totally okay. So number two, I have met people I would otherwise have never had the chance to meet, so we'll get into that. I have been able to position myself as a thought leader not only in...

...manufacturing marketing but in the manufacturing sector. I can kind of unpack that one for you a bit, which that's an unexpected impact of this honestly, and I still have some imposter syndrome around that. Will we can talk about that too, but we all do. But so the fourth one is it's fueled my content program we've been good at content. We've committed to content, you know, for many years, but this is just taking it up another level and got us thinking differently to about what we should be doing with our content. And then so that's four. Number five humanization of our brand. It's one thing to have a lot of written content, where it's words on a screen. It's another thing to have a face in a voice that people can connect with. And so that's five. And then the sixth one, which honestly maybe my favorite, is the market research. It's been just I have learned so much about manufacturing from doing a hundred episodes that I mean, I just I understand my audience so much better than I ever could have without having done this. So those are those are the sex. Yeah, you know, and that, I think contributes to number three. You actually being able to become a thought leader in the manufacturing space, a level up from manufacturing marketing. It has impact on the rest of your content. Yes, though, that impacts number four on the list, and it also helps you create more content and is probably leading to some deal acceleration right because you understand your customers better. That's change in your marketing copy on the website, it's changing the way sales calls are held. So we definitely will spend some some time on that one. Let's talk about number two, and that is the networking aspect. Right. So a lot of our customers and bby, they like this idea of content based networking, but they say, Hey, you know, I don't know if people are going to say yes to being on a podcast. You have, you know, being a cofounder of grills seventy six and and run a lot of the business development over the years. What can you say about your experience in Hey, I approach a prospect with just an opportunity to talk about doing business with with, you know, a soft pitch or a hard pitch, whatever the case is a pitch versus a podcast invitation. What's been your experience when you change the ask how you were able to get in front of your buyer persona by asking them to be a guest on the podcast, versus just reaching out, even if it is value based, asking them to have a sales conversation more or less. Yeah, it's night and day, it really is. It's I mean what manufacturing CEO wants to get on the phone with a guy who he's never heard of, or Matt who runs a marketing agency, to see if I can have thirty or forty five minutes of his or her time. Right, not going to happen. And and honestly, it was never our approach anyway. We were never big cold callers or like, you know, the car hard email is trying to get you know. It was always we've always taken sort of content based approach to try to create value and earn the those conversations. But now it's different. Right, I say it's it's really just and I don't go in there thinking, Oh, I'm going to lure this person, I'm gonna get them on a podcast, I'm going to sell them something. Right, I've never taken that approach attact. I never, not even once have I tried to follow up a podcast conversation with the sales calling. Not once have I prompted that. It has been prompted by them to me, but I've never prompted it and because I don't need to. It's just the beauty of this is, you know, identifying people who are leaders in the manufacturing industry and and some of those people are, you know, leaders of companies we would probably do really good business with, frankly, but you put the spotlight on them, you have them tell their story, you have them, you know, talked through challenges that you know, supply chain, labor things that the whole manufacturing sectors dealing with right now, and giving their perspective on it because you know their success or their struggles and how they've been worked through some of that stuff. And and the one of the biggest surprises to me, because I was a little bit hesitant at first, like, you know, you said...

...it earlier, who's going to want to talk to me? Right? It's like people. Almost nobody says No. I've had less than ten people in two years that I've reached out to that either didn't respond or said no, I don't think I'm interested. And usually when they're not interested because they just are really uncomfortable with the idea of being on a podcast. It's not because it's like I who are you? Yeah, you're going to have some of that, naturally. Yeah, people, people are excited, frankly, because they're like wow, you want to spotlight me. That's that's really well. I'd love to. I it's a little out of my out of my wheelhouse. I haven't done that kind of thing before, but I'm open to it. And then you only got coach them through it a little bit and we've develop a perspective ahead of time and some talking points and they're real comfortable by the time they're on camera. So I think you know kind of the point here is. And actually I want to say one more thing about this. I have met not only through the people that I've had on my show, but when they go out and share the content that we produce, it reaches their network and then people start following me on Linkedin. Like linkedin and Pott in the podcast place so nicely together. Like it just creates a snowball effect. When you're pulling pieces out of your podcast, you're sharing it there and you get more listeners that way. And so I've been invited into a Manu factual like groups. I you hear the term dark social and like the the you know, little industry groups or just small communities. That happen in a linkedin group, for example, and like I'm in a few of those with people who are like hard hitters in the manufacturing space and they've invited me in because they like my perspective on things and so again, through that I'm meeting people I never would have met, because I'm being invited to things because I'm positioned, as you know, someone's whose side by side with other manufacturing leaders at that. And that's kind of the perfect segue from two to three. So one, we talked about the financial impact. To we talked about the networking impact. Three, the halo effect on you and the brand, and you mentioned this before that you were surprised that you've got some imposter syndrome. I feel you. They're about being a seen as a thought leader in the manufacturing sector. And if we tie this back to something use you said at the very beginning, initially, when you were thinking about a podcast, you were thinking kind of the way you guys do blogging. Right, let's let's share our point of view and will develop our thought leadership that way and we'll give people an audio way to listen to our thought leadership instead of a written form. So how do you think the process of interviewing people in the market rather than only doing solo episodes? You still do that. So I want to hear how that plays in but how do you think that shift actually led to you being viewed as a thought leader versus what some people would think? Hey, I want to be a thought leader, I'm going to share my perspective and I'm just going to continue to blast that and then people will see me as a thought leader. I don't think we need to say don't call yourself a thought leader either way. But two pads, interviewing people in the market and being that host or just sharing your perspective. Why did the former actually lead to thought leadership? Do you think? Yeah, that's a good that's a good question. And you know I am I'll be the first tell you I am not an engineer by trade. I was never a machinist, I was never a wellde like. I did not come from manufacturing. I came I went to school for marketing and design, frank like graphic design and and found my way into the manufacturing sector and so and then I've a decade of working with manufacturers like you know. I understand that, understand the sector. I understand, you know sort of how companies buy and and certain intricacies just from having worked with so many companies like that. But I am not a manufacturing person like I. that's that's the reality, and so I never would have thought that like this, this point is probably the most surprising one to me of all. I never would have thought that people would would have, you know, like thought of me. I've there been some linkedin posts for people pretty repue with. People have said, you know, ten people...

...in Manufacturing to follow and I'll be on that list. I'm like, Oh, I'm in manufacturing. I guess I'm in manufacturing because I run a manufacturing podcast and I interview people, and so I think what it's about is putting yourself right next to people who are really truly you know those, those the people who came from the engineering backgrounds and their leading manufacturing companies or running industry organizations or whatever it may be. They're deeply embedded in that sector and when you put yourself side by side and you're having conversations with them, and I'm not trying to fake my way through this said, by any means I was never the intention, nor do I I think I'm faking my way through anything, but it's just the perception kind of changes when you are sitting next to and and talking and having intelligent conversations with people who are experts in this space. Absolutely. James Talks about it in it in his book, the the OPERAH effect, right open, shines the spotlight on her guests and she has four years and you you use that same phrase, shine the spotlighte. On the guest, and then that halo of the spotlight kind of gets to you as the host, like Oh, it's Joe who's bringing me this knowledge, even though it's not coming from his mouth. It's kind of like, you know, the the host of the party, right, that you're tying everything back to back to that host or that person who introduces you to someone else, right, that that person that you get introduced to like Oh yeah, this, this was great, I hired them or, you know, we became a customer of theirs, but the person that introduced you, there's always that affinity towards them because they made that connection and that's kind of what you do as as the podcast host. You mentioned something earlier about fueling your content program Joe, and you know, that was interesting to me because you mentioned at the open how much content you guys have produced over the years, even before you had a podcast. How did that help you guys hit a different gear, so to speak, with the pun not necessarily intended. Happy accident there. How that help you guys hit a different gear with your content program once you guys started the podcast? Yeah, I remember back when I was thinking about doing this and really trying to make a decision is the right way to go, because I didn't want to go in and kind of half assid I wanted to like do it right and kind of looking at all the benefits and I loved it. You guys were thin was an article James Carbery, from you know, it's from sweet fish, had written a about you know. I think he called it like the waterfall effect or something like that, of content, which we have fully embraced where, if you think about it, when you podcast episode like this. So here's what's going to happen after this episode. I'm going to go back and I'm gonna le You guys are going to edit it for me and then I'm going to go back and I'm going to listen to it myself. I'd listened to every episode myself and I pick out I timestamp. Probably in this one I feel like there's gonna be a lot, but sometimes anywhere from maybe three to eight. You know two minute clips where we went in depth on something and there was kind of a gold nugget, and usually it's my guess. This one will probably a bunch of me and some of you too, but it'll be. You know, something my guest said was really smart, and so we'll pull out that two minute clip and now we've got a two minute video that we can put a title on, a caption on and use it on linked it or do the same with all we could just be audio. If you're not recording video, could be the same thing. You know, we will get show notes written about this post. will use those like I take. I write intros to most of my episodes. Like I just just sort of a lead in. After I do the episode, go back and record and intro to sort of set it up. That intro also becomes my newsletter content the next week because I've written it already and I just copy and paste it, maybe make a few adjustice to work better in an email format, and now I've got my newsletter like it's done. It takes me. Used to take me three hours right my news letter. Now it takes like five minutes because I've got the content already and then, you know, on top of that, it's all the places we can publish this stuff. We can publish a full episode of the video version of this on Youtube, we can stream it into our blog...

...and write some content around that on our blog. And so not only is it just another channel to be you to you know, other type of content, but it's the volume of content were able to produce. And I think anybody, I think you're a believer in this too, but I mean, I think content quality is most important, but I also think content volume should not be underestimated because when you can consistently have something to publish, some major piece of content you could publish every week and a whole bunch of micro pieces of content you could publish almost daily, the snowball effect of your your followers and your and your viewership of videos and your, you know, readership of written content. It just grows and it's snowballs and if it's targeted and it's at the right people, all the other marketing Kpis that fall out of that, including engagement and including traffic to your website and leads you generate and business you quote from that, like all this stuff just trickles down. So that's kind of the point here is it's given me a consistent when I know every week I'm publishing a podcast episode, all those other things are going to call going to fall right out of it too. So I am never I never have a shortage of content to publish. You mention something that is so key, consistency, right, and you mention it right there that it's it's volume and it's quality, but it's consistency. You have had a weekly show where you've built kind of that muscle memory for your audience that on a certain day of the week the manufacturing executive is going to hit my phone and I'm going to get the apple podcast notification and I know I'm going to hear from Joe or here from Joe and a guest, and that sort of regularity with your audience is something that you don't get, honestly, in a lot of other formats, right, and it can lead to consistent engagement on other platforms. And so you mentioned podcasting and Linkedin kind of this snowball or this fly wheel effect between the two. Would you say that that's really been the area where you've been able to humanize the brand with, let's say the video content you guys have been creating with the micro video clips for linked in to, as you say, humanize the brand a bit. Yeah, I think Linkedin has been at the forefront of that. Point number five I wanted to make care was humanization of our gorilla seventy six brand and so so, first of all, I think just the idea of putting a face and a voice. I realize, you know, the podcast episode for the most part gets consumed via, you know, apple podcast or spotify or Google podcasting, an audio format in its full form, but a lot of the value and exposure it gets, frank a lot more of it comes through the little two minute micro clips you pull out of it. And if you don't follow me on Linkedin, please go go connect with me and at least take a look at what I'm talking about. And probably most of you listening are familiar with this type of thing because you see it from various people in your feeds. But now these little sidebyside videos or maybe just a solo video of my guest or me or whoever talking. It's the effect it creates. Is like now there is a actual human being here behind the content, as opposed to just words, and it just changes everything. It really does. Like I've had people, you know, run into me at live events and be like, oh, man, I see your you know, I see I see your videos on Linkedin all the time and I'm like, Oh, you do and and and you I've never met this person before. It's always a little surprising. It probably shouldn't be at this point, but and then the other thing is, you know, when you're in say you've had a sales conversation with somebody and then you connect with them on Linkedin and then day after day after day they're seeing you churning out all this content or facilitating great conversations that make them realize you really understand, in our case the manufacturing space, the impact of that is, you know, I just I can't say enough for it. So yeah, I think you know, coming back to your question, linked at as probably been the place where we've been able to get the most value out of...

...sort of the humanization element of this podcast. But you could also do you know, early on we were editing with video. We're editing the video versions. He's in publishing the full versions of those on Youtube. We just weren't. It was we're trying to do too much and we just kind of said, let's not worry about that now. But that's another way you could do it, frankly, like if you had an active youtube channel like you could use that stuff there. You could, you know, take screenshots of your videos and embed them in your newsletters that go out to people and drive people back to the full videos. And now you've got out again a face and a voice connected to it. So putting real people behind your brand and putting that out there publicly is is really what we're going for here. I like what you said about the screenshots in your email newsletter. We've done that to even drive people to a Linkedin Post. Yeah, with a video, right, because some people out there listening this might say, well, it's all well and good Joe, but I don't have a big following on linked in or marketing team hasn't really engaged in that channel. Or we have. We don't have anybody with a big following or company page doesn't have a big following. You probably do have an email list, yeah, right, whether that's a super engaged list or a very large list, you have an email list, right. And so if you're taking clips from the podcast and creating these three thousand and sixty ninety two video clips, which there are some great tools you can do without hiring a full time video editor. Theed Dot ioh is a good one. D script, which is a audio and video editing tool, actually has a really cool work clow for creating these as well, if you're not getting an agency helper or something like that. So you can start there, put those posts on linked in and then make those into your email newsletter and now you've got a way to pro send people to linked in and then they see that clip and Oh, I should subscribe to the podcast. is so email, linkedin and the podcast are all kind of feeding each other right, because then on the podcast you're like hey, are you not subscribe to our email newsletter? Go, go, check it out, and again the flywheel just kind of start so over. So I love the way you guys are thinking about it and you can get creative there without a ton ton of lift. All right, we're going to bring it home with number six on your list. So we talked about the financial impact directly, we talked about the networking effect, we talked about thought leadership, fueling your content program humanizing the brand. Number six on your list in the ways that podcasting has impacted your business at girl seventy six show is market research. Tell us how do you approach this? How have you kind of baked it into your podcasting motion? Or there's some things you do now that you didn't used to do based on how market research is part of your podcasting strategy, and what does that look like out the other side? Yeah, and I want to hear your take on this in a second too, loading because I know you guys have done some some things that are a little more structured than we have and I think are really good ideas to in terms of making your podcast into market research. My the reason I saved it for last and and my perspective on it. It's it wasn't even intentional, honestly. I mean it kind of was like I knew I would learn, but it's as far as it's impact, I couldn't have really guessed how much more informed this whole process would just naturally make me by just literally having these conversations. You know, hundred episodes in, I think I've done like five or six solo casts with just myself. I've probably had another five of people from my team see you take those out and then you take out, you know, some others that have had with a marketing leaders or some I've had some authors of some best selling sales books on the show. And so after all that, it's pretty much all people in manufacturing, and that means CEOS and presidents of midsize BBE manufacturing organizations, which is exactly who we know. We do business with. Its leaders of industry organizations, presidents of those organizations. It is. It's been private equity people who whose portfolios are made up of manufacturers and have dealt with MNA's and building up teams and and things like that. It's been, you know,...

...people from technology companies, industry foot no robotic systems, integrators, AI companies that are working inside and manufacturing and are on sort of the cutting edge of everything that's happening on the technology front, which is just crazy right now in the manufacturing sector. And so when I am every single week having a conversation with another person who is an expert in something related to any of this, just think about how much I probably how much I've learned just forty, thirty, forty five minute conversations every single week. I mean everything I've learned about you know this, all the issues in the supply chain and labor and the great resignation, and you know what's happening in robotics and like you know machine analytics through and you know it's like every all this stuff. That is just what the manufacturing sector cares about. Right now, I'm talking to like the leaders in the space and just learning a ton. And so you think about not only how smart that makes me, how interest I don't know smart it makes me, but like how much smarter it makes me in the context of all this and the things that I can then bring back into conversations, like when I'm on a sales call and somebody says, Hey, you know something we're dealing with right now, which maybe you've heard about a little bits, like it's really hard to hire front frontline workers. I'm like you, I've had about fifty conversations with people about that topic and and here's what I'm seeing and like now I'm actually makes a big difference. Yeah, that changes the tone of your sales conversations, doesn't it? Totally, because they say, okay, you get clear, you get me, you clearly. You've talked to people who understand this problem and sometimes I'm even bringing insights back to them that aren't my own, but it's things that I have heard. It's all the trends and patterns that I've gathered because I've talked to fifty other people who are experiencing the same thing they have, and so that's a really cool thing too. And I can get off a sales call and feel like I just helped them figure you know, maybe to figure something out, but like I gave them some unique perspectives and maybe they hadn't considered yet. So all of the knowledge I've gained is is really my favorite part. It's like I it'd like I want to laugh on I think about I like this is so cool to think how much, how much better I am at my job now just from having done this for two years. Yeah, absolutely, I mean it's just it's just baked in. You're getting you know that you should be doing these things, that over time you lose touch with your customers, you are not having your finger on the pulse of how they're saying things, what words they're using, and impact so many things you're marketing copy. I mean I think the authority that it gives you on those sales conversations. I've seen that where it's just change the tone of the conversation and, like you said, even though they're not your direct insights, you're the one who's sharing it, right, Yep, and you you're going to get the credit right, even if you cite your source. I was talking to this then. But then they also see that Oh joe talks to manufacturing executives even when he's not pitching them on girl seventy six services, right, and so it also shows that you are genuinely interested in helping people like them in their industry, which also changes the tone of the sales conversation because they see you as more authoritative, they see you as having more knowledge, they see you as more helpful, and those are all things that help your brand hundred percent. I love it. And well, you want to. You said you had a question for me about maybe how to approach market research with the PODCAST, to put some more structure to it. Right. Yeah, please, because I know I've heard a little bit from you guys about you know how you've I think you've started taking that to another level or maybe formalizing it a little bit more, if I remember correctly. So I'd be curious to hear your take on that market research side of things. Yeah, so I think that you know, as you said, Joe, you're just naturally going to get market research if you're doing this right. I think there are two next steps you could take. One kind of crawl and then and then number two would me maybe walk, and then I don't know what run would look like. Actually I have an idea. So number one, that kind of the crawl approach.

I've seen this. If you are listening to this and yours, you're in. You're a leader over sales, marketing or customer service, customer support, any customer facing role. I'd highly suggest checking out the customer experience podcast with ethanviewed from bombomb and there's a good example in his show where he bookends every episode with a standard question. The show is about customer experience. So he opens it up with his guests what's your definition of customer experience? Right, and then he closes with a few questions around giving shoutouts. What's a company or a brand that's doing customer experience well, and who is a person who's have a positive impact on your career? and He ties two of those recurring questions to the theme of the show, customer experience, and the third one he ties to a core value at his company, bombomb, in giving a shout out to someone who's had a positive impact, because they really value relationships as one of their core values at bombomb and so just by asking those repeated questions in the interview, book ending around it one, it gives you a little bit more of Oh, I know what to expect from this podcast. But also now Ethan has been doing his show for over a hundred episodes as well. He has that same question answered by people in that space right now. You can do some stuff with that. You can create a round up blog post where everybody answers it. You can create a youtube playlist where everybody is defining that and you clip out the answer to that one question right and so you can identify some trends in that. So that would be my first recommendation. Take One, two or three recurring questions and just bake them into your interview at the beginning, at the end, somewhere in the middle doesn't really matter. So that would be kind of your first crawl into market research. Beyond just pick up which you pick up. The walk would be a strategy I've seen a lot of youtubers use to drive people to like they're paid community or their patreon or a paid newsletter or something like that. Say you know you're finishing up and interview and tell your listeners, hey, Joe and I are going to hang on for five more minutes. I'm going to ask him our fast five questions. That's not going to be part of this episode, but if you are subscribed to the email newsletter for the manufacturing executive, we're going to take that conversation and do a rte up so you can hear Joe's questions to our fast five. One of those is Dada, Dada Da. Go here and check out the newsletter. And so, going back to what we were talking about before, this allows you for the podcast to feed email and then the email to feed the podcast. Plus, if you're asking five recurring questions of your guests in your market, you're going to start to identify some trends. So it kind of has double effect trend identification as well as promoting another channel in a way that's not like hey, sign up for our emails so we can tell you every time a new podcast drops. That's not super valuable, right, but it has premium content they're not getting from the PODCAST. And then I would think the the run approach would be similar to probably what you guys have done in some of your more longer form written content at grilla. Seventy six if you have done a hundred episodes, heck, even if you've done twenty five episodes and you've asked your guests one to five recurring questions, you have enough for a market research report usually. Yeah, right, without sending out out a bunch of emails, developing a survey, getting people to fill that out, sending gift cards, all that sort of stuff. It's just baked into what you're already doing. And now each quarter you can do a quarterly report that people start to get used to. You can promote that on the PODCAST, you can propote promote it via email, and that's actually a reason to for people to go deeper with your content and could be more of a buying signal. If the HEY, if they really want to go deep in this trend, now you know I could reach out to them and start a sales conversation because I actually see that they're wanting to go deep on this topic. Right. So it starts to impact more than just marketing and impact sales. So those would be kind of the three...

...stages of really structuring and doing more market research with your podcast. In my opinion, love that. I love that when you were talking about the first two, my head was going to the third one. Is like and you could probably make a research part two and then you set it and I think that is just so awesome, because people go, I mean, she's the how intimidating is it to think about like going out and doing a original piece of research? That stuff can be really powerful and if you can, like you said, bake it into what you're doing, man so efficient. Yeah, it can be really expensive to do. Otherwise it can be intimidating, but just bake it into your podcasting with asking some repeated questions and you've got the foundation right there. Well, JOE is, we round it out today. I want to tie it again to what listeners can do and what they can apply from this right and so we've talked a lot about six very specific things. The way that your podcast has driven results and impact for grilla seventy six now. You guys are a marketing agency that serves manufacturing companies how do you think manufacturing companies themselves which of these six apply? What's the same? What's different? How do you think manufacturing executives listening to this, if they think, okay, if we were going to do this, what would be the same? What would be different? How would we approach it and possibly experience some of the same results that you guys have seen at grill seventy six, knowing there are some differences between agency life and a manufacturer's Day today? Sure, sure, yeah, and you know, I think there's there's an intimidation factor when we've brought it up with some of our clients. For sure, and I think the biggest piece that that's intimidating is is the idea of having to consistently do this like week after week after week. And you know, I don't know what the right balance is. You could tell me probably better than I could. Like what's what's the minimum? I feel like if you're not doing a weekly show or at the very least every other week, it's probably just not going to get enough traction to keep it going. And so when I've thought about it for clients, sometimes I've thought about, well, how can you batch stuff, you know, like if some of this is going to be about, I think going and interviewing your potential customer, existing customers, start their start. People, you know who'd be happy. You know. You know I'm already and may be happy to get on the phone. Like I would start with a make a list of topics that you think be interested you talk about. Then who in your network would be really good, you know, to experts are talking about that, and then you just have a zoom conversation and record it and you don't even have to. I don't think your first step should be, okay, let's name a podcast, let's go get a production company and let's, I think it's have those conversations, have five of them and just see how they go. Turn on the camera, record them and you may see. You know, at the very least you're going to learn. Okay, am I capable of doing this and could I see this being impactful? And I'm my guess is for most of you'll probably be yes, like if you just start having those conversations. And then the other thing is, you know, infusing your own team's expertise. I think go go book interviews with, you know, five of your engineers or something like that like one on one, or pull a couple of them in at once and have some topics where you know what they have to talk about are things that are going to resonate with your audience. You could literally book a day and on the hour you have a different person come in and you record those conversations and and like this is a this is a way you could batch content, but also to just sort of test this out. Worst case scenario, decide not to do a podcast, you can probably make use of a bunch of that video stuff in your marketing from from day one. So I think that's the biggest pushback I've scene is, Oh man, it would just be so hard to produce this. So I think once you get started, you just naturally build momentum. That's how it was for me. I was very skeptical about my own ability to do this when I started. And you know, here we are a hundred weeks later, right and then, I think, you know, how's it different? Well, you know, you're a marketing guy and marketing people are, you know, more tech savvy and Blah Balan were manufacturers and were, you know, are behind in sales and marketing. I think you got just throw that out and say, you know, are you working with real people? Do you know that...

...audience well? Do you know that there are smart people who could offer insights to their own peers and then just trust that you're can get enough people to say yes, like that's that's get past that barrier. People are going to say yes. I don't think the impact for anybody listening right now, whether you're a machine shop owner or a you know, robotics automation company or a some Oem saw and some pet cap ass x piece of equipment, I don't really think it's that different for any of you than it is for me. It's just a matter of sort of having the guts to go out there and and do it and give it a try and baby step into it, as opposed to like saying, all right, I'm in for the next two years, like I didn't start that way. I didn't know where this was going to go. I just said I'm going to permit to doing this for a few months at start. Yeah, and you and I were having those conversations because, you know, we were involved in helping guys launch and starting to produce the show, and I can tell everybody listening that's absolutely true. You know, you and I were not talking about sitting here at episode one hundred. At that point we were saying, okay, what are going to be the first twelve things going to record? What? Who should be our target? You know, eventually, what are we going to name the show? But, just like with market research, I think take a crawl, walk, run, approach, hop on, zoom, schedule them, batch them that and, like you said, at worst you've got some audio and video recordings that you can do something with. Even if you know you totally botch it in the audio qualities bad and the video quality isn't great, you could turn those into blog posts at the very least. So you haven't lost anything, right, and so just test that out, start to start to flex that muscle and get a few reps. and it's not like you have to launch a radio lab quality show out of the gates and do all this research, because often times the people who spend all that time in the the greatest equipment and and all of those sorts of things, they don't spend enough time thinking about do we really know this audience well? Are we having the right conversations? Are we asking good questions? And you're probably doing that right internally in conversations with customers and conversations with prospects and conversations at conferences again, and just think about how could I just record one of those conversations and see, hey, this is actually doable. All right now, if we name the show, what would it be? Let's think about that, let's think strategically, and then you start to cover the other things. But don't put the cart before the horse. You know, I've been told I mixed metaphors, which is not good for a podcast hose. I went from kral walk run to carts and horses. But in any event, don't let that into a dation of trying to do everything stop you from doing something. Do something tested out, and I think you'll find, just like Joe did, that it's more approachable, it's more natural, especially given the way that we've all gotten used to having remote conversations on zoom over the last two years, that podcasting is not that much different than what you're doing there. You're happening to hit record. You just need to develop a process for it. Well, Joe, is we rounded out. Anything else you want to share with listeners today or remind them of? This has been a fantastic conversation. I thank you so much for letting me guest host on episode one hundred of the manufacturing executive here. Is Really Fun to see things come full circle and start again right. It's not like we're at the end. It's a flywheel that keeps on going. But with that, anything you want to share with listeners before we round out the conversation today? Yeah, I mean last thing I want to say. Well, first of all, thanks to you, Logan. Thanks for, you know, pushing me off the ledge here from day one and and I appreciate that. And James Carver's book was, you know, content based networking was a really big influence on me too. So thanks to you guys, and I also just kind of want to thank all the guests I've had. Everybody's been a listener. I really couldn't have imagined that two years into this a I'd still be doing it, that I would be able to talk about these six different ways it's had a major impact on our business and that, you know, we'd actually have a consistent listenership. So it's just...

...been such a positive experience. I'm thankful to everybody WHO's been a part of it. And I'm looking forward to the next to a hundred awesome and well. Thank you so much again for having me on, everybody. That wraps it up for this episode of the Manufacturing Executive. Thank you so much for listening. Joe, thanks again for having me on as a guest host. I really appreciate it. Man, my pleasure you've been listening to the manufacturing executive podcast. To ensure that you never missed an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for be tob manufacturers at gorilla seventy sixcom learn thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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