The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 1 year ago

Make Content for Your Audience – Not for Google w/ Grace Wright & Aaron Weekes

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If your content strategy starts with whether there’s keyword search volume around your SEO terms, you’re starting at step five.

Here’s step one: conduct customer interviews to learn what they value and prioritize.

In this episode, I interview Gorilla 76’s own Grace Wright and Aaron Weekes, both Thinker and Strategist, about creating winning content that starts with customers, not keywords.

In this episode we discuss:

-Making your customer’s success the object of your content

-Getting the right messages to the right people

-Providing one of these three qualities: best, first, or different

-Starting your content strategy with the right questions (lots and lots of them)

-Forecasting the future of SEO tactics

Grace Wright can be reached at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/grace-wright-76940312a/ 

Aaron Weekes can be reached at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aaronmichaelweekes/

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Manufacturing Show in your favorite podcast player.

If your customers are having a problem or they're continually asking this question, you need to create content around that, regardless of whether they're search falling around that. When there is search volume around that, and you should always check to see if there is, you should optimize it for Seo, and that's a way to get in front of your audience with that problem solving content. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving midsize manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B tob, sales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm Joe Sullivan, your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency guerrilla seventy six. More often than not, when a perspective client approaches our agency about potentially doing work for them, they say something like we need a new website, or we need someone to create content for us, or we need better seo or search engine optimization. After enough digging, what I learn almost one hundred percent of the time is that what they actually want is to earn the attention and trust of their audience and, as a result, to open doors to conversations that will drive business. It's easy to get lost in the tactics of marketing and to forget why we're doing them in the first place. Today, my two guests are going to talk about two of those tactics, one content creation, and to SEO, or search engine optimization. Will talk about how these two things work together and why they're not strategies but instead tactics, and we'll dive into the bigger picture strategy, which is generating qualified pipeline through your marketing program let me introduce our two guests, both of which I happen to know quite well. Grace Right started at grilla seventy six, is a writer in two thousand and seventeen and, realizing that she had a knack for developing content strategy, transitioned into the Strategy Department in two thousand and twenty one. Grace now craft's revenue driven marketing plans for her BB manufacturing clients. Her Forte is getting to the bottom of what bb buyers care about and brainstorming content ideas that balance technical details with brand story. Before joining the gorilla team, grace wrote for a lifestyle magazine and worked as a copywriter at a search engine optimization agency. To This Day, her written work is featured on the first page of Google for scores of keywords relevant to her clients businesses. Aaron weeks is a strategist who empowers himself and others to think critically and provide authenticity to marketing. He's passionate about understanding the magical black box of Google and wielding those insights to create impactful, revenue driven marketing...

...for be tob manufacturers. Prior to gorilla, Aaron worked at an agency as a digital strategist and at Caterpillar as a marketing analyst in the Global Construction Industries Department. Both opportunities shaped his view on how a search engine optimization mindset can help brands be searched and be loved by his customers. Grayson, Aaron, welcome to the show. Thanks for having us. Thank you. Well, it's about time we got you guys on here. I'm super proud of the deep expertise across our team at gorilla and I think it's really fun to bring people with different backgrounds and niches and in there, whether it's strategy or writing or design or whatever it is, there's so many things that, you know, an organization like us does that affects marketing for the manufacturers we work with, and so I thought this topic was really good for you guys, this idea of of how do we, you know, find that happy middle ground between SEO, or search engine optimization and content and you know what's a tactic and what's a strategy, and I think this topic is something that a lot of manufacturing organizations think about and we talked to them about but we're going to go deep on the topic today and I think some really valuable conversation shit. So, grace and Aaron, I know we share a similar perspective on this topic. So I'd like to start this out by asking the two of you. Why is it backwards for a manufacturer to go straight to the conclusion that we need better google rankings, we need SEO? So when we're talking about the customer and when it comes down to content creation and content distribution, here's how it relates to Seo. Most of the time what we hear are what we need to address is, you know, how can I win this keyword ranking? Again, that's something that makes sense. It's very tactic with search engine optimization. How can I have that keyword mind content and how can I show up in the first spot on Google search engine result pages? I think the mindset that we're going to kind of dive into here is rather how is my customer going to win with this content I created, and how is my customer going to win at their job when they get this piece of content that we distributed to them at the right place in right time? So that's a little shift. I think we're going to really going to dive in and kind of extraculate that more. But that's really what we want to get out of today is again that mind shift from going from we need to win at Seo Strategy to more how can my customers win this year and what's the strategy for that? And I think there's there's real risk in not putting your customer first and their problems first when you're thinking about what content to create, because you know, every company I've worked with has limited time, letted resources, limited budget, and so you know, let's say they have resources to create ten pieces of capital in a quarder. If they create eight that on topics that their customers don't even care about but have keywords, well then you know they...

...missed eight at bats to change how the customers think, to be seen as a value provider to, you know, their total addressable market, whether that's in search, whether that's in paved social you know you're missing on a bulk of your at bats with your customer. You're wasting your budget, you're wasting your time, and that's really the risk you run into when you don't start with the customer is you're putting your marketing at risk falling flat, and, considering how much money and time people do put into marketing, that's a huge business expense that you're putting on the line. You're putting yourself at risk alienating your audience by showing that you don't understand their problems, you don't understand their questions. There that the stresses of their day to day and so I think that people think that content creation is a risk free endeavor and it's not. And so I think when you start with SEO and keywords, you're just starting in the wrong place. You have to start with what the customer cares about and the best way to mitigate the risk of all this time, money energy you're putting into content creation. Yeah, and so I'm what I'm hearing from you, guys, is that we are go back to the beginning here and say, who is my audience? What do they care about, and let's create content assets are going to speak to that stuff, their pains. They're buying triggers the things are trying to achieve, as opposed to something that I still see happening, which sometimes blows my mind, but it's just it's still happening out there where you have companies who get caught up in this mindset that like, I need Seo, I need I need rankings in the search engines, and then they can almost forget about what they're trying to achieve here, which is earning the attention and trust of the people that they're trying to reach so they can start conversations with them and they go straight too. Well, what keywords are related to, or even tangentially related to, my business that are getting searched a whole bunch of times every month, and are you we could potentially rank for and the the natural result of this is you start driving a lot of the wrong people to your website. You Sart ranking for keywords that frankly, may not even matter that much. You drive the wrong people to your site. Those people land on your site, they bounce after ten seconds because they're not finding what they want. or The people who maybe do convert in the sense of filling out a rfq form or something are often the wrong people because they are, you know, the thing you've optimized search for for your company is is not really targeting the types of people that you're trying to attract. So it's like these leading metrics you not only don't get you in front of the right people your you know sometimes when you focus on the wrong leading metrics, you wind up in front of people who want the right people. It bogs down your team and it creates sort of a false sense of we're accomplishing something on the marketing front. One maybe that's out of the case. Like anything you guys would want to add to her, you know, comment on or on that. I think something like especially with the types...

...of industries and companies that we work with, sometimes there isn't a ton of search volume around the types of products and services that they are actually selling. And something that you said is you know they'll sometimes when they're creating a list of keywords, then, because there aren't a ton of them, they'll start reaching and you know, it's like there's this service that we don't provide but is a competing service, and you know will change their minds by writing a piece on this and that. That's just a waste of content creation energy and make opinion, whereas, like, instead of reaching and trying to change minds, which I just haven't seen happen, you could instead be creating content that you know will resonate with your audience. And think about how can you, you know, if there isn't a ton of search volumes for what you provide, how are you still going to get your message out? Well, you can target people based off of job title, industry experience level on Linkedin and make sure your message reach reaches the right people. And so when people think organic is the only content distribution strategy, I think that that's a trap they can fall into. Yeah, I just want to piggyback off that and kind of frame it a different way. When we're talking about search demand and search volume, that may be one of the first things you ask your team as a marketing executive is again like how much searched man is for this keyword? Well, there's a lot of examples where there may be no demand at all. I'll throw one at you right now. Is We know right now with customers when the biggest pain points this year is that the cost of commodities and sourcing raw materials is just so difficult. Well, if I went on to Google trends right now to see kind of what those keywords are, maybe there's no domain searched man for that right now. But we know that our customers told us directly that that's her pain point. so go write that piece of content, go create that piece of content, go distributed it to them. But again, if we just focus on SEO as a tactic in Asilo, we may head looked at there's no search demand for those keywords, so therefore we shouldn't write that piece of content. So that's just another example kind of using what we've been talking about here, of putting the customer first and then using Seo to kind of enhance that content creation. I'm going to throw one in the mix here too. Are and because I think that's that's a good example. There's a company that we've consulted recently that they they are there a fabricator essentially, but a very niche fabricator, and they manufacture something that is a product that's used pretty universally and commercial kitchens, and one of the first things we noticed in consulting them is they've been misguided by their marketing consultant from the outside in recent years around Seo, to the point where, you know, the person advising them has been essentially saying commercial kitchen is a really high volume key. A lot of people search for commercial kitchen right and things related to commercial kitchens. Well, here's the problem. Like, you're going to optimize around commercial kitchens when you fabricate a very specific, niche product that sits inside a commercial kitchens. Even if you could rank first in Google for the word commercial kitchens, which in and of itself is going to be a pretty...

...massive undertaking for a keyword like that, how much, if of the audience that sees that and then clicks on it, do you think is actually your customer? Maybe less than one percent, I mean if that. And so I think the point is, you know, kind of comes back to like WHO's your audience? What do they care about that? Actually, you know your value proposition and the things you do can address where you have something to say about this, and let's start with that not get caught up in the sort of magic of Seo, which, frankly, it's not magic. A lot of its logic and common sense. Yeah, I think when you start with keywords, that becomes a big issue. Like Commercial Kitchen, I'm sure has the ton more search volume. Then you know some of the more niche long tail keywords that they could target, and I think sometimes people look at that and think, Oh, this is a better keyword, and I think if you just take a step back and kind of to your point, just make it past the logic test, like even if I were writing for this keyword, like what is look beyond the search volume metric and remember that, like, there are real people searching this. What's the problem they're having? What are they looking for? Do you have the expertise to solve that problem? You know our if you were to provide education on this, is it valuable to you? And I think that if you just ask some of those logic based questions, you realize that your time and energy spent better spent elsewhere than trying to pursue this, you know, key word that's only tangentially related to what you sell, and I think that not a lot of people step back and ask those those questions. They get, you know, so blinded BIOS. Two hundred and forty people search this a month without really wondering what they're looking for when they are searching and remembering that there's a real person on the other side of the screen with a real problem and real questions that need to be answered. Right you, grays. I love how you said that. I think something that Joe and I talked about recently was like you should write for your audience and not Google. And if you can take anything out of today, I think that's it. Is Why we say Seos not a strategy, it's a channel. Is Because, again, your strategies your customer. How can I help them the best, the most efficient way, the fastest way I can get them to get their job done the right way? We can focus on that with our strategy and then again use SEO to hands that. Now let's go find some keywords that address those issues. You know. Now let's look at other articles see what they're doing from a technical seo level and how can we emulate and replicate? You know, if you start with both those things first, you may miss the whole point, which is, again helping your customer. Yeah, I think something I hear all the time is like you're creating content for search engines, and I think that you know, if you're creating content for search engines, you're thinking about Seo wrong. You're creating content for searchers, like real people with real problems, you know, are reading your content, and so it's just so, so important for marketers to remember that. You know, searchers are real people, not...

...metor it's on a screen, not two hundred and forty people who you know just robotically search this term, you know every month. And when you remember that, you remember that you know these are your customers. These are especially if you're choosing the right types of keywords with the right types of intent. Just remembering that the problems that some bring someone to Google in the first place, the question that brings someone to Google in the first pace, and optimizing around that person and that person's problems, you're going to be in a much better place. I think something to consider too, when you are considering Google as a distribution strategy is that Google's main objective is to answer search or intent. If, over time, they provide a list of pages that don't speak to the intent behind the search, people would stop using Google. So over time, like the algorithm, changes they're making are not random. They're, you know, better aligning their system to serve pages and articles that exactly aligned with the problem or question that brought someone to Google. And so I think it's actually doesn't six anymore where you can just mention the keyword five times in your you know, you are all in your body copy and your title tag and expect to rain over time as people improves. Their Algorithm is essentially optimizing for the searcher and you should be as well. Joe, do you want us to grace and that a kind of define searcher intent? Get a little more granular there and kind of really elaborate on what that means and maybe how to actually do it tactically? Yeah, I think have at it all right, gray, so I'll start and then you definitely come in here and enhance any my comments. But when we're talking about search intent and grace really just laid it out for you. Is Again, what is a customer searching for? And then you need to do one of three things. You need to give them the best answer, or maybe the first answer. You're the first one to write right answer that question are you need to be different. So again it's first best. Are Different. That will help you kind of get do search intent as a framework. Here is I'm trying to answer my customers question, but I got to realize that there's other answers on Google search engine result pages. So how is my question the best question for their intent? So again, just having that mindset will kind of help you create more content that's a wild impactful and then the SEO will follow. Basically. Any thoughts on that? I think I would only step take a step back and think about, like you truly understand like not only the keyword but the intent, the problem that brought someone to people to search. That it allows you to better evaluate the keyword and think about if it aligns with the intent of the customers based off of real conversations you had with them. If you kind of uncover the intent of the keyword, like commercial kitchen, for instance, and you realize that it's just way too broad to really understand what the intent is, that's not the best keyword then. But if you uncover the intent and...

...you know you can think back to a conversation you had with a customer where they were experiencing that exact problem, you not only know better how to structure the content, what questions of questions to answer within the piece, but you also are better able to evaluate whether it's a good keyword in the first place. And I think the kind of what we're speaking about is like understanding search or intent, goes back to understanding your customers. So you just have to understand your customer, the problems they're experiencing, what their day looks like and if there's a topic that comes from that piece of content you want to create, think about if there's a keyword that matches that intent, matches that problem, then use Seo. But don't start with the keyword and work your way that here's a good word to kind of understand. That is again, when you start with the keyword, what you're not focused on. It is these four things, which is is this content about being problem a where is it about being solution? awhere product to where are most aware. So why I mentioned those again is that's the mindset you have to have is I want to rank for commercial kitchens, but I know that this article needs to be about problems with commercial kitchens and here's how to solve them. Are Vice versa. I know your brand and I know you have commercial kitchens, and so when I'm looking for commercial kitchens, my article needs to speak about again why my brand is the best for commercial kitchens and why you should read my content and why it's impactful to you. So just understanding that framework will kind of just again enhance what you're doing from the content creation side, and what it gets you to do is to stop focusing on the keyword and then again focus on the problem, solution, product are your brand? Yeah, I mean Google is a venue for your customers and prospects to get answers to questions, to gather information during their buying process, wherever they are in that process, and the role you can play is to understand from pattern matching and from all the you know, the customer conversations you've had, what is that buying process look like? What sages are they trying to collect, what information, and can we provide that to them so we can fulfill that that search query and be the first one that shows up or is close to it. To you want to help, it's all that helping during the buying process and providing the right information to make it easier for them to buy and to think of you first. Nay, I think like it's kind of comes back to, like what you were saying is, like, what questions are they asking throughout the buying process? What hesitations do they have? That's all stuff that would come up organically in a customer conversation and then you can conduct keyword research and decide whether there's any volume around around those topics. But it starts with that understanding of them and they're buying process in the way they think about your product in your services. Good. Well, I want to come back around to the question I posed towards the beginning here, now that we've provided a lot more context. Grace, you said organic search or Seo is just another distribution channel for content. Could you guys talk about what that means, like what is a...

...distribution channel for content? We've talked about making content assets that, whether it's written content or video or audio or whatever, make content assets that matter to your audience at the different stages of their buying process, seo or search engine optimization. It's one way to get that content in front of people. Those that's where people who are out there looking already right either looking for something specific, and we want them to find the stuff we've made that addresses what they're looking for. But what are other distribution channels? And is other times when Seo just isn't necessarily the right channel to get that content in front of someone. I think your content strategy starts with customer interviews, if we've said time and again, and this conversation, but essentially, you know, if you conduct seven customer interviews and you start hearing the same things again and again, the same patterns come up, as far as like know, what we really valued and prioritized wasn't cost, it was this other factor, and you start identifying those patterns and their common questions, ways people phrase things, then you can start developing ideas for the types of content you need to create to address those problems, to answer those questions. And I think that if your customers are having a problem or they're continually asking this question, you need to create content around that, regardless of whether they're search volume around that. When there is search volume around that, and you should always check to see if there is. You should optimize it for SEO and that's a way to get in front of your audience with that problem solving content. I think whether or not there is search volume, you need to create the piece of content. If it's a problem that comes up again and again in customer interviews, there are other ways to get the right eyes from the right people on that content, through pay social audience, starting through emails, through even like later in the sales process. If you create a video around that you know, question, it can help enable the sales person to you know, rather than just being, you know, having to type up a response every single time than you okay, we actually created a video about this topic. Here's something that answers your questions. Let me know if you have we follow ups. So I think there's there's a million and one different ways to leverage your content. Seo is one tool in your tool get. I'll just quickly define some of the other distribution channels that we do here at grill seventy six and with our clients. Is What we're talking about with organic and Seo. Those are pulling people to our distribution. When we talked about paid social, you know, Youtube in a way to it. It's like we're pushing those pieces of content to people at the right time and right place. So again, just kind of understanding those differences will help you kind of evaluate if, I see I is a good tactic to do right now. Are you trying to pull people to your side to book a meeting, to get a demo request? Then yeah, you really want to focus on Seo as a tactic, you know, if you're just trying to create value, generate demand. And Yeah, you want your content that you just wrote to be distributed to people on the platforms that they're at right now, Star as, facebook, linkedin. So again, just wanted to kind of outline the differences so we can kind of enhance...

...the conversation of why we're talking about Seo right now. Yeah, I think that's great. You know, we talked a lot about how google is an intent channel. Right you people go to Google when they're looking for something specific. People go to facebook or Linkedin or whatever when they're they're not going there to look for something specific. But we can target very specific people, you know, using various demographic data, information about what people in you know, what people care about, what they follow, so we can find your ideal customer in some of these other channels and referencing what Aaron said that you becomes more of a push strategy where we say, show this piece of content to people who fit these characteristics and let's do that consistently over and over and over again, whereas back in Google's about showing up in front of the right people when they're looking for something, where you know you can address what they're looking for. It. Obviously the title of this podcast is the manufacturing executive, and it's because we're creating this for manufacturing leaders. I know we've got some marketing people and sales people and you know, people in other roles in organizations are listeners too, but knowing that are a majority of listeners, are not necessarily tactical boots on the ground marketers, I'd be curious to hear you guys talk about you know what do you think that a manufacturing executive, whether that is a CEO or a president or a CFO or maybe even a VP of sales, somebody who doesn't have the word marketing in their title but is is in a leadership roll at the company? What do they need to understand about content and how it relates to Seo. I think that executives, I think that the best value we can revise, like how can they evaluate content strategy? What are the questions they should ask when deciding whether it content strategy is the right bit for them and their company? I think that they should be very wary of content strategies that say, you know, here the keywords we want to write for and you know, we're going to write a piece of content that Seo optimized around each of these keywords and that's our strategy. I think it's a strategy starts and ends there. They should have a lot of questions. I think something we do in a way we frame content strategies at gorilla is very poignant and kind of ties all this together. It's when we recommend a piece of content, will always say, you know, what's the specific pain point or question from the mouths of customers we've interviewed that we are addressing with this piece of content? And when you start there and then there's also a keyword that just magically fits an into place and people are searching about that, that's what the level of thinking and understanding of the customer that they should expect from their marketing vendors. So it's not that you know, don't pursue Seo, it's start with that pain point question build the content around that. And yes, if there's a keyword that fits perfectly, there's there's Seo best practices and you need to overlay those to make sure that your customers are seeing those at the right points in the buying process, that you're getting in front of, getting eyes on the content, essentially leveraging, like we said,...

Google as a distribution strategy for problem solving content that you're creating with your customers in mind. Yeah, I think grace just laid out tactically so well. So I had nothing to add there. But what I will offers again, if you're marketing executive, I think these are your three troops and we've already mentioned some of them here. So number one, it's right for your audience, not Google, but the customer. In your mind, that's you right for first. Number two, this is one I kind of here often, like, are there any SEO hacks? No. So again, if your team is telling you it is a great seo growth tools, the SEO hack, ask them to explain more and get that information and feedback, so you can provide them the answers to understand that maybe they don't need to do that. That way they can write a piece of content that's valuable to their customers. And number three, this is another one that we're kind of asked quite a bit. So I want to address here, is, you know, is Seo? Is it a short term tactic or long term tactic? You know, I think this is one that's on executive's mind. Is You know, I want to know what the results are mine. Do I need to expect a long time frame? Do I need to expect short? Well, I'm actually going to say it's neither. It's actually a long term mindset. So why I say that is, again, customers going to ask questions and you should answer them and that should be a part of your strategy for here and now and forever, especially as more ways for people to ask questions. Another example here that we've talked about before is using a Lexa, our voice search, to search for things to so I just illustrate that point, because there's more opportunities to answer questions, more so than ever. So again, if you had that long term mindset that you know we need to do this this is a priority, then you're going to make marketing that matters in that way, rather than thinking that if I do seo today, if I do it as a hack by right for Google, like Therefo, I'm going to get quick results. The point is, like, you're not, but if you do this long term mindset, that you're going to provide impactful opportunities for your customers are in the long term. Yeah, I think something else too that they should be wary of is, like, I think something I see all the time when Seo is thought of as a strategy and not a tactic, is you get one hundred page site map all of the different pages, and you know you're talking about, you know, this variation of the key word and then even another page for this variation of the key word, and you're just thinking about what happens when you think about content in that way is you end up with, you know, let's say we're writing a page for beer bottle labels. It's the titles beer bottle labels, and then you mentioned it ten times in the copy and it's very thin and it doesn't speak at all to like the actual questions they have of the process of working with you. Know Your Company, and so I think where you end up when you start with keywords is very thin copy geared towards optimizing for the search engine, whereas like, if you really think and remember that there's a starcher and someone reading your content, you remember that you need to comprehensively answer the hesitations they have, the questions they have. It comes back to kind of what Aaron was just saying. It's like people are asking these questions, you should...

...answer them, but it comes down to that, like you should answer them. What was the intent? What are the anxieties they have? What are the problems they're experiencing? Address all of those comprehensively. If you're going to do seo at all, don't just write three hundred word thin pages geared towards drinking and search engines. That's just the wrong approach. Yeah, well, gracious mentioned that approach is it worked at one time, but just like with most marketing tactics, things evolve. So one aspect of this conversation here, which we haven't talked about, is kind of what is the future of Seos a tactic and how can you actually capitalize on it? So I'm going to offer two or three, four Joe and grace here, and you guys can kind of come off me and add some insight here. But I think one of them is super obvious, but it's if someone asked a question, why not provided to them as a video, because that's what they want, and we also know that Google is actually going to optimize those in the search result engine pages. So you know that's an opportunity we can do. The other is zero click searches, which is a phenomenon basically that when you write an article, sometimes your piece of contents going to be at the top of Google surgeons result pages, in the featured snippet is a technical term, but all that means is the customers answers right there. They have no reason to visit your web page. So how does that impact what you do and how you think about and how you measure it? And then I think let's start there and see what you guys think and we can talk about that. I think like something that we said in the middle of the call that I think it's worth repeating here is like think executives become executives because they have her judgment. Make Trust their judgment. So when you're evaluating things like an SEO strategy that marketing vendor is throwing your way. I mean, like, let's go back to the actual kitchen example. You sell niche bakery like equipment for commercial bakeries and you know your marketing vendor is suggesting that you should write a piece for commercial kitchens and just put yourself in the searchers seat. What are they looking for when they are searching that? Are they looking for you? If you write a three hundred word piece that's very thin, that mentions commercial kitchens and times and you're like, does that builds trust with your company? Does it, you know, show that you understand what they're going through? And I think the answers no one all those counts. So maybe that isn't the best piece of content. Degree that isn't the best, you know, use of your limited time and resources. It's just always going back to your judgment and trusting. Thank you. Guys said it well. I don't really have anything to add to that, but I think it's all really smart insights and great advice. So anything you guys want to add to this conversation that we did not dive into, or any additional actionable advice you'd hand to a manufacturing executive that's listening right now. I think that with Seo in particular, people are so focused on ranking first and here are the list of keywords that we want to rank for and we're not ranking for it, that they forget that,...

...like that's only half the battle. The other half is when they get to the page. Have you built or lost trust? So are you answering the question? Is it written in a way that speaks to the quality of your company, or is it sloppy and thin and doesn't address your questions? And you know, and I think that people look for Seo hacks and marketing hacks and the truth is that content creation done right is a long and arduous and thorough process. Interviewing customers, understanding truly what their anxiety is, hesitations, problems are, and that requires interviewing, you know, ten customers, thinking about, you know, taking an afternoons thinking about what through lines are between what they were saying, what are the you know, most pressing problems? And then then creating content. And you know, if you're going to rank for a keyword at all, all of that needs to shine through and that content piece or have what's the point of having that interaction, that touch point with the customer, if it isn't building trust, credibility, showing that you're the right partner. Yeah, grace, I don't have anything to edit that. It's it's just so important. What you said is, again content. It's a long journey, but if you take it you're going to find results. I do have a list of top five things to stop doing today. We can run through that now. We're can kind of dive deeper on what grace just said here. I'd say go for it. Are Okay, Great, I love this exercise. This is what I like at a podcast. I want to bring it here today. But basically, here's five things that may have been said to you as an executive and here's the five ways you should think about it. So I'll do it one by one and then Joe Grac can kind of add in what you think here. So number one, when your team comes with an article to you and it's the top ten list of here's the top ten problems by customer has to they here's the piece of content that we wrote to answer that, what I would do is I would challenge them and ask them why didn't they write this is the best solution to those problems. So again the question is, we want to hit all those keywords right and that top ten list. So we're trying to hit all those search terms. Are would you rather just write the best piece of content that is best for your customer? Number two, your team writes two thousand word long form content article to answer a customer pain point. So when they bring that to you, you can either do two things. You can say, okay, that's great, we're going to rank for a bunch of keywords. Are What you could do is encourage your team. That's a great piece of content. How can we turn this into a piece of video content? I think that's super powerful because what your team did is is they did good content marketing, but now you're going to encourage them to do even better content marketing. That is going to help them with SEO. It may not be so straightforward that way, but it's just another way to again do that content creation that matters to your customers. Here's the third one. Your team comes to you with a list of their top twenty five keywords they rank for for this...

...year. So when you receive that list, you may look at it and say, what is this? Are you can look at it and go back to your team and say, well, actually, tell me the top ten web pages on my website that result in marketing source revenue. Then show me the top keywords on those pages. So again, that's a good mindset shift where again we're not focusing on rankings, we're focusing on results. The results matter because they probably came from helping our customers with good content. And then once you get that list of those top pages and how I've new they made, then dive into the keywords. See when insight you can clean see how you can help your team out. This is a good piece of article. It makes revenue. Go produce more of that content in different ways. All right, what else we got here? All right, here's another one for you. We've already mentioned this and I think it's good to just hammer home here, but when your team comes with a piece of content they say it's going to rank for this keyword, I think you should always naturally ask, well, what question is this answering for a customer? And again that's going to encourage your team to do content that answers questions rather and produce content that ranks for keywords. So I think I actually had for but maybe you guys a fifth one for, I think, for works. I think. I think those were all really great. Aaron. Yeah, why do top five exactly? Well, I think I'm going to leave it there. I we could, we could talk all day about this, but you know we can't have a threehour podcast, so we'll keep it to where we finished here. This is a really great conversation, guys. Appreciate you doing this. Yeah, thanks for having us. Yeah, thanks for having US show. Yeah, you bet so, Grayson. Aaron, can you quickly tell our audience best way to get in touch with you learn more about what you're doing? For sure, grace right on Linkedin and just finding you, please, a Grillau seventy six or just grace dot right at girls seventy sixcom. Yeah, and you can similarly find me on Linkedin as Aaron Michael Weeks. Look out for my comments. Ask Me Questions on feedback for SEO and I'll be glad the right you have some answers are you can find me at are and dot weeks at Grilli seventy sixcom. So I mean email. Great. Well, it was a pleasure having you guys on the show's stuff. We talked about, you know, in meetings and on slack and by email and through our project management system. It was fun to kind of harness all this this brain power in our strategy department and get you guys up on stage. So thank you once again for doing this and as for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to the manufacturing executive podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for B Tob Manufacturers at Gorilla Seventy sixcom learn thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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