The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode 112 · 2 months ago

It’s Time for a Digital Transformation of Analog Data Entry

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Harnessing the power of technology allows you to do more with less. Mobile industrial apps enable manufacturers to get more done with fewer people by streamlining processes, improving the capture and sharing of data.  

Greg Bohling, the Vice President of Sales and Customer Success at Alpha Software, brings over 15 years of experience in providing digital transformation leadership to manufacturing companies. Greg coaches organizations on how to digitize manual and paper-intensive processes.  

Join us as we discuss:

  • What is happening in the manufacturing industry today regarding digital vs. analog data entry.
  • Where manual data entry is happening in manufacturing and how to improve using technology. 
  • The importance of having strong quality data in your manufacturing business.

You know, do we have more defects on a certain part or a machine that runs some of the parts versus another one, or by shift or by time of day, or things like that that they just you know, they've they've never really done before because they couldn't trust the data they had. Right you know, somebody wrote, Oh, I did this at three am. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving mid size manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B two B sales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm Joe Sullivan, your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency guerrilla seventy six. You know what drives me nuts when I arrive at a doctor appointment, check in, pay my copay and then the receptionist hands me a clipboard with eight pages of paperwork to fill out. Didn't I just do this last time? I was here. It's amazing how, in a world that has become so digital over the past few decades, how many organizations are still doing analog data entry, and in the manufacturing sector has probably many of you listening right now have witnessed firsthand. It's no exception. Today my guest will tell you why a digital transformation of analog data entry processes is so important and all the ways it will impact your business when you get it right. Let me introduce him. Greg Bowling is passionate about conquering real world problems with technology solutions and driving continuous improvement within organizations. He has over fifteen years of experience providing digital transformation leadership to manufacturing companies of all sizes. As Vice President of sales and customer success at Alpha software, Greg coaches organizations on leveraging the citizen developer movement to digitize manual and paper intensive processes. Greg, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Yeah, you bet. I think this is a great topic. Um, I you know, in my world as a marketer, you know a lot of a lot of things marketing and sales. A lot of things happen in an analog way and Um, imagine you're you're seeing it a lot of that on your end too. So I'd love to see. I'd love to have you start by just kind of painting a picture for our audience of what do you see happening in the manufacturing sector right now when it comes to digital versus analog data entry? Yeah, so, you know, there's been a big movement, Um, to automate as much as possible and you have smart factory...

...and Industry Four Point Oh, where we're attaching sensors to equipment and gathering all this data, you know, Internet of things data. But almost every company I visit there's always one part of their process where there's a person who's walking around and has to record a bunch of data and Um, that's almost always on paper, you know, clipboard, and it's a really inefficient process. So, you know, it's it's sort of a problem area that I'm really excited to dive into because, you know, there's all these benefits from from automation and from data collection and all the analysis you can do and being able to bring that last little segment of, you know, of the factory floor into those Um, I think is a real benefit for people. Sure, yeah, I mean some of some of these things probably feel a little bit obvious, but I imagine it's just companies get into habit of doing things the way they've always been doing things and maybe some of them are resistant to change. But what what's from your perspective? What's at risk when you are relying so much on paper or analog data entry? Yeah, I mean the first, first part is it's slow, right. So, Um, it almost you know, somebody has to write it down. I don't know how fast you can write, but my handwriting gets really terrible, but quicker I have to try to write. So it's it's a slow process. It's error prone, you know, in terms of did I write a five or a six? You know, can I tell my handwriting? Did I write the wrong thing? Um, have I scribbled on it? Things like that. So that that's the first thing is, you know, we're trying to capture information that's important. We feel it's important enough to have somebody go around and write it down. Um, but you know, can we really rely on that information? Very well, if if we don't trust that, you know, maybe it got done or things got skipped because it's such a long process, or you know, it was we were really busy today, so we didn't you take the time to fill out that that particular one. So that's that's the first thing. And so once, once it feels unreliable, then you're not really willing to take action on any of that data. And if you're not willing to act on your data, then what's the point again, of capturing it? So Um, and we do know that this information is important, otherwise we wouldn't have tried to start collecting it. And we want to make some decisions based on, you know, some of the quality processes, for example, or some of our quality assurance, you know, audit processes that say hey, this is important for us to maintain efficiency and Uh so, you know, it leads to a lot of after the fact decision making. So, oh, we had a problem, and now we go back to the piles of paper or spreadsheets and we try to, you know, reconstruct what led us to this problem and so we don't repeat it, versus being able to be proactive about out it and say, Oh, I've got...

...you know, the information is coming in a timely and accurate basis so that I can make a decision before I have a problem, Um, and sort of predict what's going on and it saved myself. You know, one problem can be hundreds of thousands of dollars right. So, Um, that's kind of the inherent risk in and you know these sorts of things. Is Is, you know, can I predict this in advance? Can I? Can I get ahead of the curve so I can avoid, you know, running into some, you know, fairly catastrophic issues? What are some of the like? Where are some of the places inside of a manufacturing facility where you typically see a lot of this manual data entry going on? Like, give me some tangible examples of things that are probably should not be done manually at this point, but you still see happening in a manual way. Yeah, I think you know, when you think about a manufacturing facility, and they're often very large, and while the equipment itself can be instrumented and have sensors and things on it, there's a lot of things dealing with the quality process in terms of inspecting results or expecting interim, you know, pieces and parts, where there's almost always a person that has to walk around and pick something up and measure it or make sure it doesn't have cracks in it. Um, and you know. Well, there are advances in, you know, computer imagery and things that start to sust some of these out. There's a lot of processes, a lot of things that get created where it literally has to come down to a person just looking at it and saying, is this good enough to go to the next step? And Uh, and those people are almost always on their feet. Um. There's usually, you know, measurement data that has to be taken Um and so those are kind of the areas where, you know, are are sort of right for improvement, right, and I think some of the early attempts at that are just we give everybody a laptop and they can type it into a spreadsheet or something like that, but it's really, Um, not as effective. As you know, going truly mobile with devices that people are now used to carrying around, phones and tablets and things, where you can um, sort of sort of digitize that, Um and and sort of optimized for the use case, which is I'm on my feet, I might have one hand doing hanging onto something, and I might have one hand that I need to enter the data with. Um, I need to do this quickly, I need to do it, you know, accurately, Um and, and you know, we want to not waste these people's time, you know, having to do a lot of manual effort. So yeah, so those are those are kind of the in those quality functions. I think there's inventory and inspection of, you know, equipment. There's, you know, just process audits and things like that, where you know somebody's observing something right or measuring something, and it has to be and some of it's someone maybe quantitative or qualitative right. So maybe I...

...just need to look around and say, you know, is this excellent, good or poor? Right, so you think about like a five s on it. We might say, Hey, is everything in its place? Well, we had a lot of violations, we had some, we had very few, we had none, um, and and that's a little bit subjective. And so those are some things that you can't really just, you know, put a camera up and have the computer at least, you know, not yet have, you know, an ai or something say there's too many, too many things, too many tools have been left out or the machine is too dirty. Um, you know, those are things that people have to you know, evaluate and make a decision. And so today that's a lot of that is on paper or a spreadsheet. So Greg you've talked a little bit here about, you know, the risks of doing things in a manual or analog way. You sort of talked about places where you see that happening. Your company, Alpha software, has a essentially a software solution for digitizing a lot of you know these problems. Are these these areas where you know data is but probably getting lost or not accurately recorded, or at least there is no data. I guess really that doesn't become useful to you unless it's recorded in some helpful way. So talk a little bit about, you know, your software and where it fits into the mix here for some content. So you know, we haven't probably called Al a transform, which is a no code mobile APP builder. So let's anyone turn their paper forms or spreadsheets into like a powerful mobile APP. Um. So this, this lets people digitize their processes that require, you know, somebody on their feet out there trying to collect some data. Things that are right now they're really hard to automate. So Um, you know, what this allows companies to do is, you know, get more timely and accurate information when they're out in the field or in the shop, Um, collecting it. Uh, you know, you can also pullect new types of data that you can't really with a piece of paper, like photos, Um, GPS, coordinates of where I am if I'm out in the field. Um. You know, things like that, record audio of, you know, a piece of equipment and said this is what it sounds like. It doesn't sound right. You know, things like that. Um Our software is designed to work completely offline so that you can, you know, fill out your your forms, fill out your data while you're disconnected. So if you're happen to be in the basement or a mind shaft or something like that, you can still use the application. Um. This includes features like looking at barcodes, you know, scanning a barcode to pull data about a piece of equipment or a part that you're manufacturing. Um, and also assets like quality standards and things that you might want to include so that the person using, you know, the APP is saying, okay, I have to make a determination as to whether this, you know, part meets the spects. I can pull that up even though I'm not connected to a network or anything right now. I have that available to me on on a mobile device. Um. And then, you know, the software has some built in analytics Um for evaluating all that information that...

...you get back and building dashboards and charting and things like that, but it's also designed to connect into other systems so that, you know, it can be just the conduit of, you know, adding that one piece of additional information, the manual processes, the people um into a bigger set where you might have machine data, Iot data, you know, so you can merge these all together and make sort of holistic decisions. Um and and it's you know, it's designed for a line of business user to build their own. There are APPs, we have templates that come with it, Um that you can use as starting points. Um and and really, you know, the ideas that it's driven by the business as a you know, kind of as a citizen developer. Kay, cool. What are there? Some are the success stories or in any examples where you can? You've sort of watched the transformation take place. She saw a company that was here and and doing all these things manually and experiencing, you know, the problems that result from that and and then they go through this process of digitizing and what that looked like on the other end. Yeah, I mean the first thing I mentioned is that I one of the things I like to do is ask people to show me what they're doing today, right, and so I've seen a lot of companies forms Um, and we always ask like can I have a copy that's been filled in right, because I want to see what what everybody's doing when they're out there, and just some of the crazy things that I've seen on pieces of paper that have come across Um. You know, here's a sheet of paper that has thumb prints on it and smudges and somebody's lunch build on it. Um. I've seen forms where people say, okay, write the number, but if it's a certain situation underlying it and if it's a different search of situation, circle it and there's all these special things and then they'll be callouts and arrows and all these sorts of things. So the first you know, just general success that we're able to have with with things like that is just to stand or dies, you know, the information capture and it's like okay, Um, you're just typing a number in now and it might do calculations for you on that. You don't have to do any math on your own or things like that, so that you know the end result is we're getting you know, good quality data coming in that you don't have to kind of squint at and decide. You know what do they mean when they throw this Arrow or across this one out, or you know what's under the Jelly stain on the corner of this Um and then you know, as a specific example, I've been working with a company that does blow mold and injection mold plastic parts, Um and uh so they have a pretty sophisticated the first piece inspection process. So you know, the idea here is before they make an entire production run, you know they're gonna do a single part and then they're gonna inspect it make sure that everything came out okay, and then you know, once it's given approval, then they were on the whole job.

Um. And there in their process is essentially the manufacturing tech that sets up the you know, the blow lold machine to run the part and gets it all going and runs it and has a whole page of paper that they would fill out with all the information about the part and you know what they were doing and what shift they're on and what time it was and all of this, and they would have to write this all out on a sheet of paper and then they'd have to go find one of their quality control tex to come and take a look at it, and that quality control tech has an entire another sheet of paper that they have to fill out. Some of the information is the same Um, where they're taking the measurements and preparing against the standards and saying, okay, this is an acceptable, you know, part, so we can go ahead and move forward. And that process might go back and forth a couple of times if they find an issue and they might have to go back to manufacturing to run another part and then another inspection. So it was a really laborious process there, and this pretty large facility as well, so tracking somebody down to do the next step might take a little while. They could be on the other side of the plant and things like that. Eventually they would get all this paper together into a packet that they would staple, Um, you know, with the job order, the work order and the bill of materials and everything, and and that stack of paper would have to get to an office somewhere and then they have a clerk that would type this all into a a system database, Um, so that they could try to make some Um, some decisions based on that that data, and so it's a really slow and error prone process for them. Um. So what we were able to do with them is they were able to digitize that process and we're flow and they're using tablets that the technicians have um to do that. And so now they have, you know, forms that they can collect, you know, readable data that's validated and everything makes sense for them. Um. They're optimized for the the task at hand so that they don't have to write a bunch of stuff, they don't have to type A lot. There's a lot of buttons that they just say yes, no, Um. You know, it really speeds to the ability to enter them in. Um. Those forms are set up so that they can just scan the barcodes from the bomb. So if they have the part number and they scan the Barcode, it's going to fill in a lot of that information that they were having to write in by hand. It just has a database to look it up against. Um, the you know, what color plastic is in there, what color resident are they're using? You know, they have a thousand different color codes and and so they're just able to scan those right away and enter all that in so that it's all standardized information. The other thing they're able to do is now they can collect photos as part of that process so that if something is approved or rejected, they include photos of the first piece, Um, you know, top, bottom, side, whatever. You know, they think it's necessary to sort of document Um, you know, with the inspection signing off on it, that here's a picture of the actual...

...thing, Um, and that's actually led to better accountability on their side because now, you know, the texts are able to say like here's a picture of what I, you know, did or you know, if they don't include a picture, then it's like well, you know, what's the problem here? Why? Why haven't proven that this is really true? Um. You know, the forms are able to just automatically time stamp, but you know the data as they're working through it. So this is not relying on them to write down what time it was they actually did the inspection. It's doing it for them, but also means that they can't fudget Um, which means that you know it's it's a little more accurate for them as well. Um. There's notification, you know, for these steps of the workflow so that when the first you know, manufacturing tech fills it in, it's going to send a notification that hey, something's ready for the next step so that that person can come down and take care of it without having to you know, chase people around or, you know page them over the inner camp calm or whatever, um. And so it's it's really kind of sped up that process as well. And what they're looking at is, you know, obviously time from the start to the end, you know, when somebody does the first piece to when they get done doing the job. They want to make that as as small as possible, Um, you know, because it's just throughput for them. Um. And the whole thing works offline for them, which means if they have some dead spots and the you know in the factory floor, m then they're still able to do the you know, fill in the forms and do the work that's needed. So what they've actually found is there eliminating their need for somebody to new data entry entirely. So that's a head count reduction for them or reassignment. Um. You know. They've shortened that process, you know, from first piece to full run because they're not waiting to find somebody. Um. You know, it's faster to fill this out than to write all this stuff down that they were doing before. Um, and you, like I said, with the photos, a better accountability. It's like you have photographic proof of the piece. Um. So you can't really get away with with, you know, maybe fudging one because you're a little behind schedule or things like that. Um, you know. And then they just have overall better confidence in the data then collect it because of this right. So, Um, you know, and this lets them do more sophisticated analysis. You know, they can trust the time stamps on when things happened. Um, we're able to collect the current weather conditions when they do that as well. Um, outside we're able to conduct, you know, which shift was it? What time of day was it? What Day of the week? What was the weather like? Um, and then they're able to do a little bit, you know, more sophisticated analysis by saying, you know, do we have defects when the weather is a certain within its raining out? Do we have more defects when it's raining out than not? Um, you know, do we have more defects on a certain part or a machine that run some of the parts versus another one, or by...

...shift or by time of day, or things like that that they just you know, they've they've never really done before because they couldn't trust the data they had, right, you know, somebody wrote, Oh, I did this at three am. It might have been it two am, it might have been four am, you know, but that's just what they scribbled down because they have to get this paperwork filled out and things like that. So, Um, what they're doing now is sort of expanding this into other areas beyond just the first, you know, first piece inspection. So they obviously they do audits for the production run. You know, pull some samples off the Palette, Um, and they do thousands of these a week, um. And so they're able to digitize that process as well, including photos and defect codes and and, you know, corrective action and those kinds of things. They're able to do that in a mobile sense, which then, you know, just lets them speed that process. It's you know, it's better accountability, there's better visibility, it's more timely, Um, you know. And they're looking at things like now inbound shipment of materials, right, they do quality checks on that. Now they can record in a standardized way, Um, pictures of the sample bags and pictures of the you know, the receipt and things like that and which silo didn't go into, and all of that can be reported very quickly. They're actually setting it up so the truck drivers themselves can fill out the initial delivery information when they come in, because they could be four o'clock in the morning when the truck it's center right and some of the regular docks staff aren't aren't around. And then you know then the quality of people getting notified and then they can come down to the dock and check it in and make sure sample bag looks okay and it's the right thing, putting it in the right silo and and all of that kind of stuff. So it's it's really kind of help them, you know, be a little more sophisticated and what they're doing. Um, I think it gives them a lot more confidence in what's going on, you know, overall and you know in the plant, because they're getting all that information, you know, from from people who are making those decisions are, you know, providing that information based on their observations. But they're getting it in a structured, standardized way, they're getting it timely, inaccurate Um and it just it just gives them a better sense of what's going on on the shop floor. So yeah, it's been it's been pretty exciting. You certainly have me convinced. There's a lot, a lot in there. Obviously that's super beneficial. Um, I mean I don't think it's. If you told somebody, hey, you you really need to move from paper to digitized data, I don't think anybody's gonna Argue in general. But then when you look at all the ways that it impacts your business in a setting like this, it's Um you realize how powerful it can be on a touch of so many areas of operations. And...

...think there's what's interesting is that companies are realizing there's full areas of the organization that they don't even bother with paper because it's so time intensive. It's like this information, you know, isn't valuable enough to commit the amount of time that somebody would have to do to fill out a piece of paper to do it. But now they're able to create little mobile APPs to do it where it's like Oh, if I'm, you know, doing my job and I see, hey, there's a maintenance issue here, there's a pipe leaking, I can just stop and grab a photo and fill out like a little form with like hey, here's any can figure out where I am, you know, and then just hit submit and I can go on my day. And then the maintenance people get get the information and they're able to come and send somebody to go take a look at that, whereas you know, in a without that, if you walk by and you're like Oh, that's leaking, well, that's been leaking for a week and I got things I gotta do right and I can't go, you know, fill out the form or call some you know, those kinds of things. So it opens up a lot of different areas of being able to collect data that, you know, they don't normally have access to. Write. You wouldn't think to do it because of you know, maybe it's two time consuming. Um. I worked with another company that they had a paper form, they were using the track stuff on the shift, but they didn't have any kpis behind it because they didn't know, you know, getting the data into a system to even, you know, do analysis. It was really just put in a file cabinet and they say, Oh, if we have a problem, we'll go back to the next last Tuesday's shift form. We'll go look and see if they said anything or they forgot to do something or or whatever, and so it's just like, you know, that's a process that they were doing because they felt like they needed to, but it was really just, you know, for after the fact. You know, they didn't understand how they would measure like success or failure because they didn't have the data in a system to even, you know, look at it. So there's there's all kinds of areas like that. Once you start to sort of automate and digitized those sort of manual processes, those paper processes, that really open up new avenues for ultimately you're trying to be more efficient and cost effective than everything you're doing um and and that's kind of the whole, you know, the whole monitor behind it. So, okay, let's take a quick break here. I want to let a couple of our strategists at guerrilla Sei tell you about something pretty cool that we're doing right now for marketing folks in the manufacturing sector. Peyton and Mary, take it away. Yes, so I'm Peyton Warrant and I'm Mary Kio. Twice a month we host a live event called industrial marketing. Live right now we have a group of fifty plus industrial marketers from a variety of manufacturing organizations. We meet up digitally to learn, ask questions, network and get smarter. Every session has a designated topic and one of our team members at guerrilla seventy six opens up by teaching for the first half hour or so. Topics have included how to get better at a manufacturing Webinar, getting started with...

...paid social on Linkedin, how to optimize your website for conversions, creating amazing video content and so much more. After we break it down, we open it up to q and a so we can help you apply all of this in your own businesses. This is pure value, no cost, no strings attached, no product or service pitches, just so unadulterated learning experience. Oh and on top of these live sessions, we've also opened up a slack channel where our attendees bounce ideas off each other and learned together all week long between sessions. We're building a true community of manufacturing marketing professionals here. So if you or someone at your company has the Word Marketing in his or her job title, please consider telling them about it. They can visit industrial marketing live dot com to register. We love to see you there. Yeah, and I imagine there are probably some intangibles too. I mean, I'd be curious to hear from you and everybody's, just about everybody listening right now is probably being impacted in some way by, you know, the labor shortage and manufacturing, and I'm just kind of curious. Do you find that when a company really embraces technology like this and they start doing things in a more efficient, tech savvy way, that they just the perception of their business both to their existing employees and potential, you know, future workers who may be vetting them as a as an employer? Like? Does it have a positive impact from that perspective? Yeah, because I think younger workers they've all grown up with technology in their lives. Um, you know, they everybody's had a smartphone. You know, if you're talking, you know, somebody who's thirty or younger probably doesn't remember a time that, you know, you didn't have smartphones. You know, my my daughter got hers when she was in Fifth Grade Right. Um, so, you know, it's it's things like that. So they're used to having technology around. So when they're looking at places to work, they kind of they want to a forward looking company, you know, and they don't have a very high tolerance for like mundane manual tasks, and it's because they've been able to eliminate them from their own lives, you know, with technology. You know, they have robot vacuum cleaners, right. It's like, Oh, I don't like to vacuum, I I was just buy a robot vacuum cleaner and it'll do it for me, right. Or online ordering. It's like I don't have to go to the store, I can just, you know, go to my APP and I can have a sandwich delivered to me or a or an office chair, right Um. So they, you know, they're used to that kind of world, where it's just like anything that's sort of boring or laborious, you can eliminate that through some kind of technology. So they want to work at companies that are are doing the same thing and, you know, getting rid of you know, they don't have a they just they don't want to do the really long, boring tasks. And who really blames them? Right, Um. So...

...they're also looking for jobs where they feel like they can make a contribution to the company, right, even even at the you know, entry level. And so something like the Citizen Development Movement, where you have tools for creating, you know, software and APPs that don't require you to be like a programmer or a developer. Let somebody that's in that line of business, you know, make an APP that solves some problem without a lot of work. So you sort of get the people that are have the expertise of the business problem at hand and they're able to create the applications they need to kind of solve some of those problems. Um. So, you know, having that kind of culture and an organization is really attractive for for those types of workers because they feel like, you know, they're contributing, their voices being heard, they don't have to do just busy work. You know, everything they do is important and uh, you know, on the cutting edge and those sorts of things. So it really, you know, kind of takes just a little bit of a culture of maybe investing in technology or in being willing to evaluate technology, look at ideas on. Okay, this is how a process has always been done, but is there a better way? Can we make this more efficient? Can we make this, you know, less annoying? Things like that, and I think those are the kind of organizations that a lot of, you know, people are looking to work for even in a manufacturing sense, even if they're, you know, just operating, you know, on the on the production line, they still want to feel like that. Then maybe they have more of a contribution than just, Um, you know, putting things in boxes or pushing a button, you know, six times a minute, Um, where you know they're able to contribute, you know, to efficiency and to, you know, the process and the success of the company and those kinds of things that those are those are areas that I think we see across all industries. But Um, certainly, I know manufacturing is struggling, Um, to sort of attract younger, younger employees, and it's a Um, you know, something that that has to get solved as people start to age out, Um, you know, and and need to, you know, find ways to backfill those those roles or or automate, you know, and eliminate. It's probably probably a bit of all all of that right. It's a lot of a lot of forces. I think they can work together to help solve some of the problems that are going on right now with with Labor and you know that just the way the workforce is evolving. So it's good, Greg. Is there anything I did not ask you that you'd like to add to the conversation today. No, I think you know. For me, it's just I'm really excited to, you know, talk with companies and help them sort of on these journeys of how do we how do we sort of scrub out these manual processes? HOW DO WE BE MORE EFFICIENT? How do we eliminate paper? Um, you know,...

...because of the benefits there are immense, you know, in terms of cost and time savings, Um, and and just improving, you know, overall quality, improving overall efficiency. Um. So you know, this is an area where, I think you know, it's kind of a long tail of of, you know, modernizing manufacturing and that, you know, the machinery has been getting all the sensors and, you know, robotics and automation and there's just there's always this manual process behind it that Um kind of got left behind. So it's been really, really exciting to work with companies to sort of get over that hurdle and, Um, you know, kind of kind of move forward it. Well, Greg where would you direct people to connect with you and to learn more about Alpha software? Yep, you can go to Alpha soft. WEARE DOT COM, Um, and there you can see both the transform application as well as some of our industry solutions Um, look at some of the sample templates that we have, some of the case studies of companies that we've worked with Um, and that's it. Beautiful. Well, great, great conversation today. I appreciate you doing this. Sure, yeah, I appreciate your having me. As for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to the manufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episode. Subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for B two B manufacturers at guerrilla seventy SI DOT com slash learn. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time, two.

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