The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 2 months ago

Diversity in the Manufacturing Sector w/ Andrew Crowe and Justin Sherman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The manufacturing sector is desperate for more diversity in gender, generation, race, ability, and other underrepresented populations.

Quite frankly, the situation is dire. Your business won’t survive unless you create a more diverse and inclusive culture, both organization- and industry-wide.

In this episode, I interview Andrew Crowe, Founder of the Elevate Institute of Advanced Manufacturing and Justin Sherman, Founder at Equity Machine Works SPC, about attracting young, diverse talent in manufacturing.

Here’s what Drew, Justin, and I talked about:

  • The extreme numbers that show the need for diversity in manufacturing
  • The strong connection between culture and diversity
  • Strategies to attract young folks to a manufacturing career
  • What leaders of diverse teams should and shouldn’t do
  • First steps in how to grow a more diverse team

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Manufacturing Executive in your favorite podcast player.

They may not want to flume burgers,they don't want to work the retail jobs, but manufacturing is none of that andwe're paying higher wages. They just don't know that it's here and if theydo love is here and they might have tried it, then they might know not havebeen accepted so they're back home, but they want to work. Welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here. You'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles and you'll learn from bt sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get into the show, welcome to another episode of themanufacturing executive podcast, i'm joe sullivan your house and a cofounder of the industrial marketing agency gorilla. Seventy six i've talkedabout the skilled labor gap and resulting labor shortage with a lot ofmanufacturing people over the last year, and i've heard this topic addressedfrom a variety of angles: robotics resort, apprenticeships, job shopsinside the walls of high schools. All of these are amazing things and viablesolutions, and they all work even better when you start putting themtogether, but not until my conversation with today's two guests did i reallyhear anyone talking about one of the most viable solutions to this massiveskills gap problem and a solution. That's right under our noses and that'sadvocating for diversity in the manufacturing work force. I thinktoday's episode may be the most important one i've recorded to date. Soif you listen to this and you believe in what these two incrediblemanufacturing leaders are saying as much as i do. Please share this withsomeone you know. On that note, let me introduce my guests: drew crow has beenreferred to as the leader of the new american manufacturing renaissance drewas one of the leading mines and movers on the front lines and the criticalbattle of closing the workforce and skills gap in the manufacturingindustry he's one of the most sought after speakers and consultants in thespace teaching manufacturing industry leaders how to reach higher and retainthe next generation in manufacturing drew is also one of the leadinginfluences responsible for growing awareness of the industry among ouryouth and is at the forefront of training. The next generation ofskilled manufacturing industry leaders he's doing the work to build the bridgebetween the manufacturing industry, the youth and our communities throughcollaborative efforts, organic reach and private and public partnerships.Justin sherman is the founder of equity machine works in washington, state anda thought leader on work, force, development and organizational culture.Justin focuses on collaborative engagements, breaking down barriers andcompounding strategies to grow and diversifie industry work force. Hetravels to consult for businesses ngo's and local government in support oftheir efforts and for speaking and media engagements for the industry.Justin's background knowledge and experience lend him unique. Skill setsto address some of our overlapping community and industry challenges. Thiscoupled with deep empathy for all stories and his thrive and help thrive,mentality make justin a force for positive and productive change, drew injustin welcome to the show guest. Thank you very much so excited to me anexcited to have you guys and since since we first talked in person a monthor two ago andrew and i actually got to meet up in person in the flesh for abeer which was pretty awesome here in st louis and rock well. It had been on my list,one of the the coes places that i've seen and sang losman. I appreciate theinvitation yeah for sure yeah. The two of us i break it was it was we andrewdrew, i'm always calling you andrew drew you go by both, but we met up withchris lukey, who i'm sure some of our listeners know host of manufacturinghappy our podcast another one. You should be listening to if you're, notanybody, who's who's doing a name here- and this is this- is a w like one ofthe things i just love about being a podcast host is just a people. I've metand you know, drew you you're say louis guy. I never knew you like. I saw youaround linked in a little bit and more and more over the last year, as you'vereally kind of seem to pick up steam there and stuff, but it's just cool theway. I think this podcasting experience has connected me to other people whoare influencing manufacturing and hearing their stories and making mesmarter so but yeah it. It was great to actually see somebody in a flash. Youknow after this year and three months plus of covian stuff, so we had a had aseventy degree like which is not not common in st louis for anybody whodoesn't know st louis and once june rolls around it's like s and humid soanyway, those good stuff wellguys. We...

...have a very important topic ofdiscussion lined up for today. I'm thrilled to have you both here, becauseyou're doing some stuff together. You've also got different backgroundsand unique perspectives on this topic, and we've got a lot to cover. So let'sjust get right into this thing: yeah, let's go for it awesome. So i'm goingto tee you guys up with a very broad question to kick this off. Why isdiversity in the manufacturing sector so important, and why right now so imean in simple terms: your business won't survive. If you don't engage withit, you know we got. I guess you know a lot to get into, but you know reallykind of just comes down to the fact that comin culture is changing thedemographics of you know our nation are changing andthat's continuing to happen and those that engage in this space moreeffectively, you're going to be the ones that that win. So i mean it, youknow it really matters, but you know from that. You know the more importantthing is, i guess you know creating opportunity and inclusively within ourindustry and really making it more attractive to you know younger motives,generation overall and really making these workspaces. You know somethingfolks want to be a part of, particularly when you know we'relooking at competing with other industries. If you look at st louis, you know we'reall very familiar with it and sat louis is a city that looks like a lot of themajor cities, it kind of mirrors in chicago or detroit, where a lot of themanufacturing has left the city property. We see the effects of thejobs that leave the tax money. That leaves an the opportunity that leadsalong with it right, so our cities in our inner cities are they're dying andthey're getting a little bit rougher because it seems like there's. A lot ofscarcity in manufacturing is one of the things that can solve those scarcityissues and those jobs issues because most of our entry level jobs pay veryhigh. So we definitely have to bring it back and include the areas that, andmost of the population is going to need it number one number two. You knowwe're in a field where you know we're creators right and we're innovatorright, whether we're making parts that we've been making the same way since,like h s o t s, we're thinking of newprocesses, there's no tools that are coming out every day, we're trying tomake that process more efficient and faster. So we can spray on our mardiright and when we have a lot of people that come from similar backgrounds withsimilar experiences, you don't really get that divers, your thought and we'releaving out a lot of different angles and creativity and innovation that willhelp us compete on a global scale, because this is a global market. Youknow- and this is a global industry right so, like like justice, saidearlier- it's preco at this point we're looking at the the jobs that are comingback, that are unfilled, we're looking at all of the resowing efforts and themad in us a re surgeons, and none of that means anything if we can'tactually deliver on that promise and deliver on those statements by makingthe parts right and what other fields are becoming more inclusive and they'rebecoming more. You know diverse it's more attractive to the youth that arelooking to get into job. So you know it's turning off and turning away someof our talent most of our talent in we're losing out on our sector becauseof it. We can't effectively close the skills gap without you know, addressingthis is a core issue. You know we definitely plan on getting in is indetrahit nombers later, to kind of you know, explain with hard data. You knowwhat this looks like, but you know we've already got a tremendous amountof open jobs and, as retirements continue to accelerate you know,assuming you don't after we find out what the data looks like from ovid andhow many retirements happened happened through that i know a bowing. Therewere a tongue, and so that's going to need a lot more open jobs, butresurgens demand increasing a lot, and you know it's just going to it's goingto compound a crisis level. You know, if we're not, even if we're notconsidering where it's at right. Now that and so engaging with you know alarger potential work force and ways that you know see them include them,attract them to this industry. That's going to help us close that skills gap.A lot faster and the demographics were going to go over later is kind of pointthat out so the let's go there. Let's just get into it, while we're talkingabout it, you know what what is what is the demographic, because i know youguys have some some data you've pulled from some studies and things, but whatwhat's it look like in the manufacturing sector for people who maynot really realize how how extreme some of the numbers are? So if we go justyou know straight for gender demographics, a fourteen percent ofmanufacturing this email, but that...

...doesn't account for skill position.That's not just skill positions, that's everything and us and most anybody elseis going to be listening to this podcast and go back on their experienceand see what what that typically ends up. Look looking like, and so, if wesort of like center down to machinist, you know drew an eyes background. It's!Ninety five is ninety c. Ninety four point: nine percent mail, so five pointone percent enow and how this makes impact is when, when men are the onlyrepresentation or you know, we could really kind of like do this foranything where it's like. You know if there's only one group that is the onlyrepresentation or the dominant force or the only ones in power, only decisionsare kind of made from their perspective and they can't necessarily know exactlyhow to sort of like properly engaged like. Otherwise, it's why the likethought vivert super important, but it also creates you know, cultures thatare centered around maleness right and if we think aboutyou know what that looks like you know when when we're growing up- and youknow everything that we see- and you know it doesn't create an inclusiveenvironment for women, and you end up with things that really are a lot ofthe stuff that we that ends up turning folks away. So there's you know, i havepersonal connections to folks that have left industry because of basically likejust oppressive, like gender focus like dress code requirements. You know sohave quite literally got two contradictory stories where, like womenare not allowed to wear skirts, because they're too distracting and in theexact opposite, which is women weren't allowed to wear pants because they weretoo masculine like we don't even know. If that's necessarily legal or not, butnobody's really doing anything about that kind of stuff, and these storiesaren't on common and they're sort of born from this sort of you know,demographic disparity that happens right. If you had, if you had women atthe table making the decision, they definitely wouldn't have been puttingthat rule in there right, and so that's just like one small way that it impactsthings as eighty five point: five percent light, in fact thing, and youknow that is definitely not the makeup of you know our racial diversity inthis in this country either, and so you have a lot of superior underrepresentation for other folks that play out in the same ways that you knowi kind of just describe for women, and you know it makes a big difference andthen there's you know, generational impacts right and we know how big thoseare all the time you know, because everybody talks about generationaldifferences. It's like a you know: favorite pastime, all of ours, but theaverage age of an adult us worker is thirty, three and a half, but theaverage age of a machinist. Forty five point eight and that bell curve trendson the other side. This is where all the retirements become so risky, andyou know our sort of lack of success and sort of like drawing up at largestale. You know younger folks into our industry, we're not we're not catchingup, and so this is why you know going back to the first question like. Whydoes it matter now? Well we're looking down the barrel of a gun right now,really at the ownership level. So that's it! That's that's just happen.Machining in an you know, administrative level at the ownershiplevel. It's even worse, you know it's even more. One sided, so when you arein industry, then needs to attract something different to survive, butyou've been doing something one way for so long. It kind of our industry got tothe point where a lot of things that are not accepted anywhere else are, islike every day happens, tans right and we look past a lot of things. How we,you know, let a lot of things happen and brush it off. As where machine iswith the generational gap, we have a huge issue of all school new schools.It's every shop, you walk into there's old school, there's new school rightand hear that that vernacular her the language and you got the older machineswith all the knowledge and stuff and they're feeling, like you know, theycan't keep up with the technology or these young guys are going to taketheir. You know position. So we have these weird, like hazin rituals andlike these rights of passes, that don't make you a better machine, is nine tonsof the ten? Don't make you one to stay in the field, but you know in order tolike you, know, feed your family or you know, cross the burning sands ofmachining. You have to like go through these weird. You know situations inlike like haze visuals, and we are one of the only feels that you know thattype of thing is kind of normal. You know so we're super arcad, but becausewe've been that way for so long, it's like that's what people expect and it'sokay right. So once we start doing things like you know putting people inpositions and diversifying the field, that's how you attract the people thatwe need to fill these jobs. So if you...

...can't see somebody anywhere past, youknow an operator that looks like you. Don't believe that this company isgoing to help you move through life and build your career. You don't believethat this industry is something that is a career, a lot of the shop owners thatwe consult with and speak to say you know they can get people to doadvocations. They give people to come in and maybe start training for thirtydays, but they don't stay, maybe even ninety bits, but they now static andthat's a gland issue of culture once they get inside of the building they're,not seeing something. That's going to be a return for their investment fortheir time, so people are in. There were attracting them, but we can't keepthem because inside the systems and the cultures and what we've been doing forso long are turning people away and is not even worth the money and it's notevon work then senses that were throwing to try to get people attractedto this ing because exactly like the culture ends up playing such a big part,and that doesn't mean like culturin diversity in this case are not the samething. But thinking about you know, demographic makeup of this space. Sowhat happened to us? You know in the late s early to zan, alas, outsourcings going on tons and tons and tons of job lops, the way that you kept yourjob just by having more skills than the person. Next to you right, it's likeyou know, knock down a bees nest. You just got to run faster than everybodyelse right, it's so like that's it, and so it creates a very, very competitiveculture and in security, around questioning of your ideas right and sowhat we ended up getting was this very sort of like guarded, and you knowoften at times sort of aggressive work culture. That's that's been developedhere. You know it's. This is why you know we're kind of focus on clavertonengagements, and you know why you know joe when i hear you when i hear youpitch chris's podcast i'd like yes, this is it right like we're allcommunity, and so- and this is the sort of expectation of the younger workforceand you've seen other industries make this change already to people focus.You know leadership right rather than just bottom line focus it your shit andthat's the move. That's the new man, american manufacturing renaissance, andit it's about collaboration. It's about this younger generation than saying hey.You guys have not listened. You guys, aren't listening, you're, not lettingus in, but we love this industry, so much love american manufacture. So muchwe understand how important it is so we're going to take it amongstourselves to just start doing to start, collaborating with each other to startsharing each other's platform to start sharing everything that we do online tohow it be more visible and to help people get in and see. You know,podcast, like your secrets, loki see, you know my face, see justin space andhear about the things that you might not see it in your immediate company. You might not see it.I med right now, but we're out here and we're making the changes you know andand the results are going to speak for itself right so eventually, when wekeep going, we keep doing these things and people start knocking that doordown. Everything is going to have to change right because it's going to befinancially viable and is going to be, you know, sing or swim right. Yeah isit's an exciting time honestly, i mean seeing you know getting to be a part ofthis change and then watching it happen, and you know content like this. Youknow these topics that we're talking about other topics that have thiseverything under the sun has been talked about as the reasons for skillsgap issues, except for this, and that was happening, and you know it's folksare getting excited to talk about it because there's a lot of people thathave been thinking this way, but not really feeling like they had this faceto talk about it this way, and so now i think you're right, i think you guysare. I think you guys the fact that you're shedding light on on this andand as it relates to this, the skilled labor gap- and you know the challenge that just aboutevery manufacture, i'm talking to right now is having, as we you know, were. Italked to somebody this morning and she said she's like i used to get excitedwhen orders came in and now i just freak out, because how are we going toget them done right and- and here you are with with you know, a perception ofmanufacturing that it's, that the dirty dark, dangerous thing right and andyou've got a lot of people out there. Who could be? Who could be engaging? Imean, drew you you, i know your work at rankin and you've been engaged and you are anafrican american male in st louis working with the youth to get theminterested in manufacturing a d, and i mean what what better place to go. I'mjust curious. What do you see and from what do you see in from young folks? Asas you all of a sudden, you shed light...

...on what a manufacturing career couldlook like and you show them your path like? What do you see and how arepeople respond into? That is their excitement. It's overwhelmed becausewhen i was younger and i was in the field- and you know i was trying tofigure things out and teach myself- it was very hard going through all ofthese things that come along with being the only other person right and then itwas something that i didn't encourage people to get into. I didn't evenreally talk about what i did, because you know i didn't want other people togo through these same situations trying to pursue. You know a chant or you knowa better life you know, but once you know, i found myself in a positionwhere i could start making some changes and i started consulting with companiesand speaking to them. I saw that most companies in our fields want to dosomething. They know that it's an issue and they want to to fix this thing, the best that they canright. So that was very encouraging and then, as i started, getting out intothe thetan, i say: okay, the companies are going to hire you guys they want.You know to give you an opportunity they want to. You know help you, youknow get into this field and i start telling these young people what thisfield is, and they see what is done for my life and i can show them realpositions of real careers on the back end where they can apply these skills,and these companies aren't just you know, you know. Just random names arecompanies that are local, that they know and that they know that they'veseen somebody work there that went through my program and it's becomingmore real to them every day and then with the new technology as coming inthe industry for point no they're so excited because now they're saying thatthe skill set that they have and they grew up you know, honing is covered inin this field- is going to be something that is going to help push this fieldforward. So there's an excitement as far as you know, being able yeah liketo get into it an exciting fact or like wow. I didn't even know that this thingexisted. It's a career, that's going to take care of me like in a good way, andi can grow up and go to sales, i'm goin to programming, i'm gon os, i bigwhatever they want to do, there's so many actions and it's a whole world,that's open to them, and, and more importantly, what's more exciting forme, is their path isn't going to be? You know, like my path or like manypeople's had before me. Who came from you know? Maybe the other side of thetracks, or you know came from you know- were minorities are just whatever itmay be, because this is an issue when there's people like us now that arefighting the fight and talking to talk and making sure that you know thesethese, these companies are receiving them well and sending them up andgiving them a platform to show their skills, and you know, be a part of thecompany. So it's amazing, on top of that, when i get a student that comes in or just aperson that comes in nine times out of ten is not because they have. You knowa particular interest in manufacturing, or maybe they didn't even know ninetime ten, they didn't know anything about it right. It's really the thecareer in the life change that's tied to getting into this field. So when iget a kid that knows nothing and then- and you know to sommese for semesters,he's working in the field and now he's writing five acts. Machines and, likeyou know, ems and, like you know all these different things that he had noidea existed and he's getting paid twenty a an hour. It's like changingand they call me and they so excited they all stake me, but with manufacturing i don't. I can't runthe machines for you. I can't you know, you know, hit your numbers, i can't youknow algren for you. They do it. So you know like thank me, but this is whatmanufacturing does i'm thinking? We think the industry right. It's greatguys, you've hit on diversity from a few angles, but like how would whatwould we say diversity? What does that mean to you guys? What are we talkingabout? You know it's not just about race, it's not just about male orfemale, or age like what it's everything so tell me more. Don't packthat a little bit tell us tell me. Toly list is more about that yeah. So you know gender and racer likereally sort of quick and easy to go to, but you know is sort of common culture.Isn't particularly you know, queer accepting as well right or some jobs can be hard to makeaccommodations for disabled folks, but not all of them, and we see lots ofsocial enterprises really doing a great job there. And so it's about like this.This idea of just overall in clusivity...

...right, like making making these spacessort of like accommodating and welcoming to everybody, and it reallylike boils down essentially to like empathy right sort of like the abilityto kind of you know see. The other person quote unquote right, that'sreally what everybody needs and when it's, when we're talking about so likecommunication efforts on these topics, that's typically where the challengelies, as folks aren't actually seeing. You know the other person right they're,seeing like the their perception of the other person, but that's you know notactually based in reality, so messages get sent but they're not received inthe way that that they are sad. And so that's that's the thing that we'rereally trying to sort of like do a lot of work around as talk about thesethings in relatable ways discuss you know some of the demographic changesand the sort of like overall sort of like macro level stuff that madeeverything what it is, because none of this is something that anybody like anyone person bears any responsibility for and- and this is where you know drew,and i and others like us- can really kind of like help a lot, because i, asthat added you don't know what you don't know right, and so i see a lot ofvery well intentioned efforts fall flat because you know the folks that aremaking the decisions around what those efforts look like aren't connectedenough to really like know what you know there there target you knowaudience actually needs, and so we see again like lovely kind of wellintention had of efforts, but that just completely miss the mark and in somecases, end up like working against them, which is like that that hurts, becausethen that becomes a discouraging factor and and so so you know, i guess youknow, if you're a business leader, that's listening to this, that you knowyou want to do something but you're not really sure like take the time to reachout to a consultant of some kind and and get that help, because i promiseyou, if you were confused right now, you're not ready to make those choices,and you want. You want some help kind of learning everything that you need toneed to know to do all this stuff the right way. I you a couple examplesright, so i spoke to a company, an owner of a company in this south andthe owner was like you know, i'm having this problem. You know getting theworkers and keeping the workers, and also you know i try to get workerskilled up and you know oski. You know to you know not just the operators butprogram, different languages and all of that right and he's like out of. Ithink it was like seventy eight people that were eligible only for wentthrough the training program and he couldn't understand why nobody wantedto take this and he put a ton of effort into this and a lined with standardsand just did a lot of work. But- and i ask him- i say well when someone goesthrough the program, have you on centola it or how do you show them thatyou know this? Was you know something that we covered as a company and hesaid? Well, we give them a token and then the challenge point specificallyyes and we put their name on a taker and the lunchroom, and we call them out,like you know, clap and all that and those types of things are things wheremaybe his generation rellytive ed right. So his generation even said you know, iwould go to work and i work my but off to get one of those things, and i takepride in this is a different generation right. So his generation had a lot ofthose mans laws higher ar b needs met by their entry level jobs. It was astrong middle class right, so he didn't have all of the same means that theyyou have today so a coin may have been something at that time. That meant alot, but today, kids are struggling where high cost of housing, who they'restruggling with real del things where their dollar isn't really stretching.As far as his generation so a coin, they can't feed their kids with it.They can't take it to another to the bank. They can't take it to anothercompany to recognize that, so it's really kind of meaningless and that'swhy people don't want to do it, but we have to talk to the youth and allowthem to say opportunity to talk back and let us know what they need so thatwe can help each other and collaborate. Another one was a company that has alocation in the south, and then they have a location of north and minnesotaor something right and they were, like you know our company in the south, fivehundred centem machines all hole minnesota. We can't get anybody try toget people from. You know, neighboring towns and all that- and i suggested whydon't you offer housingd and do an...

...internship program over the summer, andif you offer housing you can lower the pay and people come out there and thenthey'll be able to see over the summer what it's like and they'll be morelikely to stay on after they graduate or you know, the printish program oranything like that. He couldn't understand it. He's like: oh, no, neverwork. I came immediately to the machinist who are looking for jobs inmy classroom and said: hey guys. What are things that will make you go to acompany and stay there in light of like high pay or location that you boughtthe number one thing that they said was how housing is important to you thesedays, so not saying that you know everything has to be changed andeverything has to be flipped on its head or everything has to be differentand we have to do everything that they want us to do going forward is notabout appeasing anybody. It's about saying hey. I need you, you need me, weneed some things together and i can help you and you can help me and as wegrow this thing and we call this skills guy, we can reassess and see what itlooks like then now, how do we move forward? But the first thing we have todo is say hey. This is not all american machine, old, american machining andthose old systems and how we came up this, isn't it any more and if wecontinue to operate the way that we've been operating were pushing the youthaway, especially in this digital age, where you know they could stay at homeand they can. You know three design for somebody else. They can do whateverthey want to. They have mobility with, with with jobs, going war alive, zoo.All of these different things that we are accustomed to using and theirexperts are using. After you know a year and a half two years of staying athome every day doing these types of things their digital wizards. So, ifthere's anything that they don't like in a particular job or particular shot,they don't have to stay, they can go because every shot needs machines, sothey have the mobility that we didn't have back then. So this is a wholeanother classic group of people that have a ton of different issues insituations that weren't the same for us. So unless wespeak to them in a way that that we can understand in what we seeing whatthey're saying, does we're not going to understand and we're not going to setthem up? You know just to come here or to baby what you're saying here drewthat is just sticking out to me and and just kind of screaming at me loud andclear. Is we need to listen and you know justin earlier you mentioned theword empathy and i think that sums it up pretty well right, like we need tounderstand that you know the work force and what they want from us and howthat's changed over the course of a generation plus and listen to that. Ithink your example of the housing example is just amazing, because i meanyou have an organization that can't find people to do the job and isthey're making assumptions about what people want. You go back to yourclassroom and i ask just ask them right: what would you guys want housing weneed housing like that would be. That would be amazing if we had housing thatwould take us out of our city and put us in another city for a job. If weknew that that could could be taken care of- and i mean you think, of thecost- the opportunity cost of not being able to fulfil orders. You think of youknow these machines sitting here empty right with nobody on them. You think ofthe c, what they're probably spending to recruit in other ways- and here youhave a very simple need that and yeah of course, there's a cost to that, butthe retires conected, the r, exactly like you said, and then on top of thatwe know that you know study, show in every industry that workers that feel happy and they feelrespected, produce way. More almost like three eggs, you know, so that'sgoing to open your margins and and again this is a digital culture. Theseare kids right, so information spreads so fast. That's that's! That's whatthey do you know. So if we do things like that, the first thingthat they're going to do is put it on ready, are they're going to put it on.Instagram are they're going to put it on all of these places where they areand that's going to be the thing right. So no, you know you can go and go workfor this company hang out out here and pay for your housing and nine times upten. You know the kids. I will take half of what you would pay anothermachine. Is you know to be a there that you don't know is going to stay? Youknow, so it's simple things that won't even take like a...

...trunk out of your budget is justrearranging the same money that you're paying people now, like you said. Sowe've got to see these things just in a different life. Another thing you knowour industry is being on. I don't need a website. I don't need a digitalcrisis. I don't need you know these things work them out. He does the samecontracts. My grandpa has been running with the run he says for years, o o cana joe experts right now, so so so we need we on on the youth and inattracting the talent side. The first thing that kids, these days are goingto do if a job offers them or they're. Looking for a machine shop to work inthey're, going to google they're going to google they're going to serter,going to look it up right and as they google they're should have look for awebsite and for these kids, that's normal for them. They've been shopping.Online they've been watching videos online they've been teaching themselvesonline. They become millionaires online right. So these cans, the first thingthat they do is have online and they check machining right or they chace,specifically your company, and if they see an old website, that's going toturn them off right. So their day old website and crated company old machines.Don't want to go to it right. No matter, if they sure or not, or they don't seea website, the person that they're going to see from your company mostlikely is an indeed review or a glass door review, and if they have somethingbad to say about your company or if the reviews don't look like something thata young person who's ear and wants to get into the field is going to want tosee your cut out there too and they'll talk about it online right. So, whereyou don't have a digital present, they're going to put one for you andthey d to control what it's saying or what it's not saying. So you know smallchanges, small changes that we see that we have you know an idea from otherindustries diversifying going digital having web presents during digitalcontain. It all gives you return on investment, and we have case study evercase that ever ca study, and we is, i don't, do it right, so we got to makethe change. We got to make the change, and you know it's not just for theyouth, but it's for the companies as what yeah. So i guess, let's like hitsome of that, so fifteen percent more likely to have a bove averageprofitability is or if you have diverse, a diverse company, this one's bigger, athirty five percent performance advantage. If you have a gender diverseexecutive team versus not- and this is just like- it's an idiot kindof pocket book- peace, o gender, diverse teams outperformed by twentyone percent- so you got like above average profitability sothat fifteen percent number you're moving up the bell curve. You have athirty five percent performance at the age and this is like you get diversity of that and that'syou know, that's the thing that the company really benefits from and thenemployees are benefiting from being in a more accepting and welcoming place. Imean you know it's like think about the difference of what it's like to youknow exist in. You know, sort of an anxious head space, because you knowpeople are aggressive or you don't feel like they're seeing you at all. Youknow they're constantly saying stuff that it's like clearly not what theyout to be, but you can't you just have to be there and bear it or what haveyou right or you know again, like aggressive aggressive work, spaceversus you know being happy for the third of your life that you'recommitting to your career. You know, like the health benefits that that has imean it's. The changes in organizational culture have like deepand vast and like interconnected kind of like positive outcomes when you gotowards that that model of people focus leadership and that looks like you know.Folks can look this kind of stuff up, but servant leadership, pumbleleadership, approaching things in vulnerable and humble ways and helpingkind of create relationships with your staff so that they actually feelcomfortable coming to you- and you know you create good feedback loops whereyou get you get data coming from everybody all the time. Let you knowlike what's good: what's not the makes your company more agua, like you becomequicker to respond to things, but then again you also have these differencesin ideas and and this in those difference in the differences and ideas,are the things that, along with some of the others, director,contributes to those performance, advantages and women on on leadershipteams. You know if, if we think about the sort of like standard kind of tropestuff that that might be out there, you know around what male leadership lookslike versus female leadership. If we're talking about you know, servantleadership, combe leadership,...

...vulnerable leadership, being sort ofthe more productive model here like it. It almost makes immediate sense. Youknow how this works, but you know companies need to make really specificand kind of direct changes, move with a lot of intention like going forward and-and you know thinking about empathy- i mean that's like you know- alldirections you know like people do have to be given kind of the space to fail,because that's where learning occurs, you know that a couple of the bestplaces that i've ever worked that performed to insane levels like quiteliterally like i mean cutting down, need times on complex projects for liketwo weeks to two days like nobody else. Nobody else was even able to come closeto that and it was through this sort of like hale, fast mentality. Right, likewe support failure right, that's this is where we learn and then we becomethe best. This way right, but like old school thoughts were like. Oh, you know.If, if you do something wrong, like youknow, we got to treat your asking the nexttime. You're out, you know, even if it's like totally different context,and you know persons, learning and growing, it's everybody makes mistakes. I got. I haveon to right. I do want to make this point as well that diversity includeand inclusion is no assimilation. So when he talks about empathy, diversioninclusion doesn't mean hire women that act like us here or hire. You knowblack and brown people that act like our culture that do the same thingsthat we're doing the bad right. So what what the target here is and to get thisreturn on. You know on that diversification and all of those thingsyou have to get people and you have to empower who they naturally are andtheir what makes them do works right. So you know not saying like this guy ishired here because he drives the same trucks as us. Some huts and you know,he's got or competition here to box to hire. You know i'm saying so: it's moreso who's the best person for the job they have skills. Can they do this joband then we cut with the uniqueness about where they come from or who theyare. That is different than what we have here and we take their differencesinto account and they take ours into account. So what we're? Having thesemeetings or we're having programming meetings are we're trying to figure outa set up or work? You know trying to do these things is not all of the peoplelike us put into it and not this person. You know everybody and all of theangles are considered equally and then you build from there and, like justice,said that emity allows you to have at the empathy and the safe space of lyingable to fail safely allows you to have a penetration of understanding at everylevel of your company right. So if the the song guy knows that his job issecure, knows that, even though he does not make me look like our come from orspeak the language or you know, do the same activities outside of work aseverybody else in here my opinion, and my you know when i say hey, this couldbe better. It holds the same weight as everybody else, and i'm not going tolose my job because all right so guys i can't help, but to think that somepercentage of those people listening right now are thinking with fully goodintentions. Okay, yeah. This diversity issue in manufacturing is a problem,but i'm trying to keep the lights on here and i'm trying to build aprofitable business, and i can't make this a priority with all the otherfires and trying to put out in the things we're trying to achieve as acompany. What can you guys say to that? Knowing that probably a lot of people,a lot of believers in manufacturing organizations probably would like toembrace diversity? Maybe they just don't know where to start or how to?How did it start? Moving toward building a more diverse organizationand they're feeling overwhelmed like what actionable advice? Can you givethem to get them moving in the right direction? To tackle the first part ofthe question that you asked there, i just kind of want to bring it back toright where we started, like your organization, is going to struggle thestret to survive. If you don't take actionable steps now, in the short term,it's going to look exactly like it did, but eventually you're going to seeothers grow and you won't hope, leave your shop to go work at others, etc,etc. So you know it's going to be important and it's going to hit youwhere it hurts for sure things that you can do so when we talk about like hiring sold emw a what a consultant would do is sort of like come in talk to you about whatyour goals might be like you know, do an audit and then they sort of likenuance kind of contextual...

...recommendations, but there's some sortof like overarching kind of generalized things that can definitely be done,which is you know, introducing work flexibility wherever you can for thosesorts of things right. That's a that's a huge, like top top item, specificallyfor, like millennial generation younger, like work life balance super superimportant from sort of like the cultural inclusively sort of likeaspects of things like modifying your holiday policy. To not just you know,focus on you know the sort of like traditional holidays that we've kind oflike grown up with, because those aren't the holidays that everybodycelebrates and that actually has never really been. The case is just only onetype really have, and so you can modify things to give folks a lot of like plexdebates for holidays, so they get the opportunity to choose for themselvesand and the ownership over. All of that right, like that, that's a big bigpiece too, and then you now start doing some studyingaround. You know organizational culture, change and sort of like leadership,just in general from this sort of like servant, leadership aspect, you knowwhen you, when you change over to people. First leadership like you benefit, you been out of thisentire process and you know getting. I guess you know finding that point thati lost earlier for a moment. You know that that desperate perspective piece,you don't know what you don't know. Everybody benefits when everybody isaround different folks, because now you sort o you start building intrinsicuther standing, and you know exposure to things that expand your perspective,and so you know the the business is benefiting, but every single person inthat organization benefits in a strong way to their own crystial development,to their abilities, kind of like understand, foaks that come fromdifferent backgrounds if acted to them, but i want to drop back to that, butyeah or jump in. So i would say number one is to do exactly what you just saidsay. I want to change it. It's important to me. I don't know how. Assoon as you say, i don't know how. Then that means you begin to either look forthat knowledge or see somebody that already has it that's already doing itright and in manufacturing, like you said that so many fires all day everyday and most manufacturing executives are great at debt being a manufacturingexecutive and if they could make the change, we wouldn't be in this. Thissituation that we're in right now, so you keep being grated with you gratedand say i don't know this, but is important in it, and we need to do thisand then talk to somebody that does reach out and connect and collaboratewith people that do reach out and collect, connect and collaborate withother shops and your immediate area that may you know, be doing some thingsthat are working right and collaborate with schools, collaborate with thelocal, like urban league and find where the workers are. There is a youth joblist situation going on as well like there's, there's you people, there's,there's teenagers that want to work. There's you know twenty to twenty fouryear old that want to work right. They may not want to flume burgers. Theydon't want to work the retail jobs for manufacturing, because none of that andwe're paying higher wages. They just don't know that it's here and if theydo nothing here and they might have tried it, then they might know not havebeen accepted so they're back home, but they want to work. Everybody wants toheard you know, i'm saying so. They're here connect with them, but if you havea machine that has worked, and it's not fronting, it's not making you moneyright now. It's costing you money so put that machine into one of thesecommunity organizations, teach somebody there or have hire somebody to startteaching people how to run those parts. And now you have production in lave apipeline of workers that can come. So it's all about collaboration. It's allabout saying. I don't know how to do this, but, most importantly, it's aboutsaying that i need to prioritizes, because i can almost guarantee thatmost of the fires that they would be putting out wouldn't be fires. If thisthing was taking care of a while ago right- and we all need to contributeabsolutely and were we that bad, but we got to work together, you know, so iwant to talk about work force development program. So you know it's abackground. O dew drew- and i both have a background in this, but connect withthem. You know: connect with your technical colleges. Connect with thetrades programs that are in your area become an advisory board member. Thatstuff helps a lot that helps them. It helps you they get access to theinformation that they need to the third delivering on what the industry wantsout of out of the students that are coming out of their programs. They getthe support, they get thought diversity with the more people that are coming int to do that, and you know you become a...

...part of that collaborativecollaborative effort to help for everything, because you really with allthis resorting pressure- and you know- we've got bills in the works theregoing to be bringing a lot more main, like attention to manufacturing.There's going to be money like getting doled out to apprentice apprenticeshipslike those apprenticeships that they're going to succeed, that they needsupport, and we don't really need to be competing in the in the ways that we'reused to like we are going to be living in a period of abundance. There's goingto be more work than we're capable of delivering on. We got to work togetherto figure out how to do that, because if we don't that work's going to goright back to where we're trying to get it from and we're going to be in thesame position, we were and we're not going to have that strongly backroombase that we want this country lay andrew justin. This was an amazingand incredibly important conversation. Today i have a ton of respect for bothof you guys and what you're doing. I really appreciate you coming on theshow to spread the message that you're working so hard to get out there in themanufacturing community. So thank you. Thanks for having us show and i'll beseeing you around town for sure, because i'll be in st louis, a lot morefrequently know it it's great to hear while we're throwing around. Thank youyou're important and thank you. You know the more that have peoplecommitted to building platforms like this people committed to you knowpromoting platforms like this seeking out people that are that are that haveimportant opinions and- and you know the thought leaders that are that arechanging the field is highly posed, and it's so important to us and it's soimportant to the industry as a whole that we have these opportunities. Youknow to have places that we can speak about this and you know there they'rereal in their authority figures in the field, so you know thank you for yourdedication to you know manufacturing. Thank you. You know, for you, know,building this show and building this platform and continuing to build it andpromote it and find the best people to put on it, because we need me in so so.Thank you awesome. I appreciate you saying thatit's my pleasure to do so. It's an honor to to bring guys like you who aredoing good in the world on here and kind o spread your message. So if i cangive the platform for that, then good at least i'm doing something here,right awesome. Well, i love for both of you to tell our audience how they canget in touch with each of you and also just a little bit about each of yourrespective organizations, because you guys are both social entrepreneursright now and both doing some really interesting things both incollaboration but on your own as well. So talk about that a little bit for wepart ways yeah. So i think easiest way to reach me is likely going to be onlinked in so we had a few different things going on. But if you know, ifyou're interested in equi machine works learning more about what that is, i cango to ecodomas ine dot works. We got a new age website address and you knowour social inari is really focused on creating workforce development programthat creates those that those collaborativeengagements with outreach groups, preprint groups, apprenticeship groups,industry organizations, like local government kind of create a pi pine forfolks that create opportunity for disadvantaged populations and alsoworks to increase the diversity with our within our industry and through avariety of compounding strategies and breaking down barriers and addressingwhat might be some key challenges for folks that you know said you know ifyou're living in poverty you're going to have that list of you know how's ithousing, access, wood, access, transportation, access, those thingsare going to be potentially problematic and new ones right. You might need tohave taylor solutions for for each person. So that's that's part of whatwe want to be doing with along our pipe line is to make sure that people aresupported. So you know drew mentioned masle har archive needs earlier, youknow por needs or may you can't really go on to the next level, so make surethose are met. Now we're focusing on education. Now we're building ourselvesup and then there's we're going to have a point. We self sustenance is thereand the rest of this history you know, and so what it looks like is in goinggoing from from out reach into preapprehended pre pressure prayingdoing our program. Your long j t you complete your first year ofapprenticeship and at the end of that year you get placement services outinto you, know, partner company, and that creates space for an opportunityfor somebody else and then scale that up show others how to dosomething similar. There's a lot of opportunity to do things like this anddefinitely about helping anybody set up systems like that produce positivechange for all of us all right. So, if you want to get in touch me, you couldfind me on linking as well andrew crow, crowe and right now i am on because oflaunching our first pilot program for elevate institute of advancemanufacturing, which is a smart factory in his a four point of factory and workforce. Chinese intet and we are really focused on areas like saint louis,where there is high crime and there is...

...high youth unemployment and we areusing a manufacturing and american manufacturing to turn those thingsaround and getting these inner cities and build them back up, bring the jobsback brain. You know the tax money back, go the schools up better and i'll. Justuse american manufacturing to change america, and you know we're going to dothe first one here in st louis and then we are looking at cities like dc andchicago and detroit where manufacturing can do the same thing. So i am workingclosely with companees, like the urban league foundations, i mean like theurbane and local organizations, be you the tangent center working with you,motherhood, single mother groups and the local city cte program for the highschool and we're just bringing that awareness, bringing these opportunitiesand bringing this access and bringing it back to the inner cities to get. Youknow some of these people that have been passed over a good career and agood start on on generational changes. In addition to that, we are equiti thefinishing touches on a manufactory trailin. You seen a coupleof these popping up all over in their really great ideas, to put it inpeople's faces and we're going to go to the local institutions andpenitentiaries and put mayberry on the map. That way, i know, tighty was oneof the main proponents of you know, from from prison to the to the machine,shop and thriving. That way, i am am a fella myself. You know earlier in mylife, i didn't have the access in the opportunities and i made some baddecisions and maybe fracturing change my life as well. So it's somethingthat's more of a personal mission, but i think that you know it's anopportunity for people that want to change and want to. You know, do betterand rebuild it's the perfect opportunity. So that's what i'm ongoing across america and pushing this new american manufacturing resoce. Ilove it guys. Well, once again, thank you for your time today. Thanks forbringing this message, and as for the rest of you, i hope to catch you on thenext episode of the manufacturing executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools, specificallyfor b to b manufacturers at grill. Seventy sixscore flash and warn. Thankyou so much for listening until next time.

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