The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 3 months ago

Leveraging Ecommerce for Manufacturing’s Digital Immigrants w/ Curt Anderson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you think ecommerce isn’t for you, you’re wrong.

You need to leverage ecommerce immediately (arguably with pricing, too) to increase your visibility and make it easy for your ideal buyer to make a buying decision on a Friday at midnight online. 

In this episode, I interview Curt Anderson , eCommerce Evangelist for Manufacturers at Ecommerce MGMT , about why ecommerce matters so much for manufacturers — today more than ever before.

Join us as we discuss:

-Why manufacturers should quit being “the best kept secret”

-Curt’s 3-prong approach to ecommerce

-SEO and keyword strategies for digital immigrants

-An opinionated view of pricing

Subscribe to The Manufacturing Executive on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

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As a manufacturer. How can youhelp your ideal buyer, that soul mate, make a bind decision on a Fridaynight at midnight without having you wait for you to open up your doorson Monday? That's a competitive advantage. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast,where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving midsize manufacturers forward. Hereyou'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B tob sales and marketing expertsabout how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get intothe show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm JoeSullivan, your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency Gorilla Seventysix. When you think about e commerce, what comes to mind? Probably Amazon, right, or maybe buying clothes or coffee or fishing gear from oneof your favorite companies online, but in general consumer products, right. Whatmost people wouldn't think of is a six figure custom configured piece of manufacturing equipment. Yet here we are. It's two thousand and twenty one and this isa very different buying landscape than it was even five years ago. In today'sconversation we're going to get into this topic of e commerce specifically for manufacturers andwill look at different things that e commerce can actually mean, because it's timethat the industrial sector shifts its mindset about how to respond to the way thatbuyers actually want to go through their buying process. On that note, letme introduce my guest. Kurt Anderson. Founded an e commerce company in onethousand nine hundred and ninety five that was ranked three times on the Internet retailermagazine top one thousand e commerce companies. Since selling that company, Kurtis servedas an e commerce consultant targeting manufacturers. Kurt is the author of stop beingthe best kept secret, founder of bobtailcom and cofounder of e commerce mgmtcom ande commerce resource guide for manufacturers cart. Welcome to the show, Joe,what an honor. Thank you so much, Fan. I am absolutely thrilled tobe here with you today. It's some thrill to have you here whereyou know I. There are a lot of people that I've had on thisshow at this point who I have discovered through just through linkedin and often becauseof little micro clips I've pulled out of podcast episodes that resonated and then westrike up conversation and you kind of follow it. Fall into that category.We kind of share a lot of we're running in a lot of the samecircles and in the manufacturing sector, if I find absolutely and what I loveis, you know, just to kind of you know, I know I'mon your show, but I got to throw it back at you, youknow, a little love your way. You know, you guys and yourteam just do an amazing job and it just it was this was a longoverdue for me to connect with you. You guys that grill seventy six justdo such incredible work and so again,...

...thank you. I'm just I feelvery blessed to be here today. So well, thank you. I appreciatekind words and I'm going to be on your Webinar are coming up soon too, so by the time this is live they may have happened already, butthat's going to be fun as well. So I really like what you're doingon that front. Yeah, awesome. Well, very good. So,Kurt, you know I did during the first year of this podcast. You'regoing to be episode and seventy sh here. And during the first year, somewhereback around thirty or forty or so I think I had, I didone commerce or one episode touching on e commerce. Didn't go super deep onit. It was a good, you know, episode to sort of diveinto the topic. But there's so much to discuss there and when I metyou, I'm like, all right, I got to get we got togo deep with with Kurt here and get some get another perspective. And sohere we are. So we're going to get into that today, but firstI would love to hear a little bit about your book. I really Ilove the title. Stop being the best kept secret and you told me alittle bit on our last call what that's all about, what that means,but I'm going to let you say it in your words. Well, thankyou and and and again, kind of throwing something back at you guys.I know you know you're not the best kept secret because you guys are outthere. You know you do. You and John do an amazing, amazingjob, and I just I want to say again why I'm so thrilled tobe here. You guys are truly truly American entrepreneurial success or. I lovehow, you know, two buddies get together, a side gig turns intoa business. A business is now twenty two individuals now not only call thiswork or a job, it's a career and you're providing for twenty two differentfamilies out there. And you know, you're helping manufacturers to stop being thebest kept secrets. So again, my hats off to you and John.Just so admirable and I have just such teep respect for what you guys haveaccomplished. So you know, again, I just wanted to I feel compelledto share that. Well, thank you. I really appreciate that. Means Alot. It's very inspiring. You know, I, and you mentionedyou know, I started a business hundred years ago. I'm much older thanyou and so just have kind of looking back at you and John and Ispend a lot of time kind of, you know, found what you guysdo and it's just it's really just such an inspiration. You know, thebook stop being a best kept secret. So you and I both target.How can we help manufacturers? You know, and you know, heartbeat of America. It's really basis of our economy. It's not what it was, youknow, back in a day. But boy, there's a nice resurgenceand, you know, revitalization of American manufacturing right now. So it's reallysuch a blessing for both of us of being this space. You know,I had to eat commerce business, you know, had a nice run,sold it and like and what do I want to do when I grow upnow, you know, I was like forty at the time. I'm now, I'm not forty anymore, but I kept calling on manufacturers trying to helpthem with the commerce and I'd be like Hey, Mr Mrs Manufactured, tellme about your business. I mean, you know, they're like, oh, we're the best kept secret, we're the best kept secret. I justkept hearing that over and over. I'm like, man, I don't thinkthat's a great marketing strategy. We might need to turn that around. Andso, therefore the titled Book Is Stop Up Being the best cap secret,and it's probably you know, it's still...

I go into the ECOMMERCE spin.It's probably similar what you and John Do. So I kind of have like afor tier attack. I know we'll dig an e commerce, but it'sit's very, very similar what you do. You know, are. So wedo? We offer free, do it with you, eat commerce trainingsessions. Okay, free ECOMMERCE training sessions. And what we start with is thatbuyer persona. You know, we can probably dig into that little deeperthrough the conversation. You guys, I'm sure, start with that. Youknow how critical it is for the manufacturer. Know, who are you selling to? WHO's that ideal buyer for in my book, in our trainings,for our little qt word, we call it. Who's your soul mate?You know? Basically, our websites are no, you know, are linkedin profile. How you and I connected? You know, if I was anHR guy or CFO or whatever, you and I would have connected,but because we both sing too. I don't sing. I'm a horrible voice, but if we were singing, we're singing the manufacturers from marketing standpoint,you know. So we go through, you know, how to find anideal buyer, how to make that great first impression. We call it webpression. Are you making a great first Webpression, whether social, your website, so and so forth. We talked about dominate. Search is number three, and you and I were talking about this a little bit, you know, like when you niche down and manufacture and there's so many keyword opportunities toreally dominate search and people like, Oh, come on, you know it's totwo thousand and twenty one. How can you take those search engines?Well, we're manufacturers, Knich down. There's just an abundance of opportunities.And then our last approach is we talked about what I call how do youget offensive without offending in any commerce? It's like utilize in market places,and I'll wrap up on this. A lot of custom manufacturers like, Hey, wait a minute, you know, we don't have a preparatory product whatto the online market places. Why would I saw an Amazon? We godeep into a lot of hardcore strategies for those custom manufacturers on using those marketplaces and ECOMMER. So that's kind of what the basis of the book,stopping, the base best kept secret, is about. Yeah, I loveit. I think it's a really smart I love the title. I thinkthe you know, I hear the same thing all the time. Let meyou know. It's man, we we've got the we got this this killerproduct. It's you know, it's so much better for these reasons, andthey're these industry giants and nobody knows who we are, you know, butbut our customers just love us. And such a common thing. It doesn'thave to be this way. That does it exactly. So, you know, in the challenge for manufacturers. And and again, that's why you've thrived. You know, when did you guys find your it was a two thousandand three, two thousand and six, the the seventy six and girl ofseventy six, for anybody listening here, is who everyone just where name camefrom his seventh month of those six, which is you know, we'd probablyhave named our company differently if it were happening now. But Hey, wewere like twenty four year old guys, didn't know what we were doing andI think it's phenomenal. But you know, and again, Joe, what youknow? As you discover you know manufacturers. Do you know you're runningto a lot that have been around for generations, some, maybe even overa century, right, if not longer, great culture. You know everything aboutout them as phenomenal. You know,...

...unfortunately, just you know will fortunately, unfortunately, the you know, these built a great legacy without needingmarketing, right. It was, you know, trade shows, word ofmouth, sales rep goes on the road pounds of pavement. You know,this is how grammar and GRANDPA did it, this is how generations have done it, and you know it's been gradually changing as the new generation comes in. Covid really, as you know, firsthand, just really brought this wholeissue to light. Hey, wait a minute, I can't go to atrade show. There are no sales reps are grounded. They can't go that. You know, our customers don't. Won't let ourselves up to in.What do we do? Ah, wait a minute, my website was builtin two thousand and five. Looks not too good. And so, youknow, how do we change the I can't. You know, I'm doinga search for your product, your service or your solution and I can't findyou. You are truly the Best Cup secret. You know so and again. That's why company like really, somebody six, is so valuable to themarket for manufacturers to help conquered. You know those strategies? Yeah, Imean the thing is that all the power in the buying and selling process hasshifted to the buyer over the you know, the last twenty plus years, asmore and more information has become available, as younger generation has risen up andtaken more control and they don't want to be cold called. They wantto go investigate things on their own. And then all of a sudden youthrow last year and what happens with covid on top of it, and traveland facetoface, you know, largely going away and and some of it won'tcome back like some of it will, some of it won't. So it'syeah, it's just this. It's such a change in the way companies needto be operating and I think it's this particular topic that we're on today isthat much more important for that reason. So absolutely, and we, asyou mentioned, we have a Webinar program we do every Friday. You know, we're fortunate enough you're going to be a guest of ours and you know, maybe you'll come out round the time of this show, super excited.You have a great topic that we're going to talk about. But we hada jouleman that was on our program recently in and I love, you know, I'm sure you love doing these podcasts. Man, I learned every time everyweek. You know, seventy percent of the buying decision is already madebefore they even pick up a call, you know, the phone, ordrop you an email. You know they're doing all that research on your website. You know. I know you have a dynamic team of journalism majors.I know like your way, Missouri, one of the top, you know, in journalism schools in the country. I know you have a few folkson your team from Missouri and a lot of heavy creative minds, great journalismbackground. You're helping people tell that story where you know where manufacturers they justthey you know, they they flew under the radar. You know, hey, we like just kind of like doing our little our thing, keeping itlow key and that this is all change. And so now, you know,bringing on a team like you, blogging content, video strategy. Youmentioned linkedin. Social you're like, man, do I we know facebook is for, you know, hanging out, what I had for dinner last night? No, you if you're you know, everybody has a late there's labor shortageseverywhere right now. Well, guess what you're now competing with? Ifyour you know, competition, even people...

...that are in in your field.You're competing with fast food restaurants for good quality tailent. Now, if youknow twenty something would, who would be an all star at your manufacturing operationdoesn't see that you're posting on facebook, that you're posting on social what's goingon behind the curtain? You know, Jeez, I drive by that bigbuilding. I don't know what you guys will what you know, you contributeto the community what's going on there. So I think again, stop beingthe best kept secret, not just for customers but also for recruiting. Youknow, talent is is absolutely critical these days. Love it. I completelyagree. We'll curt let's get into this ecommerce topic here. So this isreally your world and want to tap into your brain power here. You havedescribed to me. We had a call, you know, few days back tokind of flesh out this conversation a little bit what we want to hiton. You describe to me a three prong process, or maybe a processis right word, but three prong approach to ECOMMERCE for manufacturers, and I'dlove to spend some time here breaking down what each of those three things are. Yeah, absolutely, and I think what's so common in whether you seethis frequently, you know, you land on a manufacturer's website and I'm sorryto say this, there's this awful, horrific disease. Joe, I don'tthink you've ever heard of it. We call it the we we syndrome andif you're not familiar that we we syndrome, what we encourage manufacturers and when wedo our training to our workshops, we get a big kick out ofit. We do a lot of work with the MEP's that's a manufacturing extensionpartnerships. We just did a program today at Purdue University. Yesterday it wewere in Pennsylvania. Day before. We're at in a Bread University of NebraskaMEP, and so we get it's a it brings a lot of smiles,a lot of chuckles. We caught the we we syndrome. I think Iknow where you're going here. I think I think I know, but Iwant you to say it. Yeah, but, and I won't take creditfor this, my dear friend, if you know else in the fort shewould be awesome on your podcast. She'd be a great guest. I'm goingto credit my dear friend, my Bestie, allison, of this term. Thewe we syndrome. Is Count How many times use the word we onyour website? We have great capabilities, we have great equipment. We havegreat skills, we have the best. Just ask us that at Ada rightin the challenges for the buyer, the person. It's all due respect andmen were all guilty of this. They don't care. They don't care aboutus. They just want to care about the solution that is provided, youknow. So when we go through these trainings, we walk, you know, we go through, we go deep into a lot of examples of likeflip this, flip the story and make it all about them. Okay,so now in that I do buyer, your soul mate. They land onthe website and you know, I'm I'm glad you mentioned byers, Joe,because when you think about buyers, they are sometimes the most I know ifwe were in school and call it pick that on, but they take alot of heat all day, every day. You bought too much of this,you bought too little that, you brought the wrong size here. Youknow, the buyers beat up all day and that's who we're targeting. AreThose buyers right? So why they're getting beat up? Now we're trying tocome in. Now, we're trying to sell something to it. So thegoal is, how can we make it as easy a is humanly possible.So the three pronging approach. I'll run...

...through a quickly. Number One,you know a lot of times and we sing to the custom manufacturer like Hey, wait a minute, you guys are talking ECOMMERCE. You know, wemake stuff for other people. That's not really us. And RFQ is,by definition, ECOMMERCE. Man. It's somebody sending you a drawn and askingyou let's conduct business together. Right. So do you have a clear,concise call to action? You have like a big form. Hey, Tommy, your firstborn, your social security number. That, you know, like makeit super easy, called action. I think we're going to get intoanother little pricing conversation. But you know, just how can you turn that aroundas fast as possible and make it easy for them? So, firstand foremost, make that RFQ eat. Make it easy, make yourself accessible, easy to do business with. Number two, how can you jump ine commerce? And so we go through like specifics, examples and we're andit's awesome when we have we take manufacturers through our training process. Of thelight bulb goes off and we're like, man, even though I'm selling afour or five, even a six figure figure product, we can use ECOMMERCEand when they discover that it is so exciting and we're they're going to likenow all sudden go on a shopping car. Maybe they'll put it on Amazon.And we have a company in Alaska that has like these big heavy dutyfuel tanks for helicopters, and so now she's going to start. She's goingto go in that direction of like ECOMMERCE. We have someone that does like thesebig ceramic molds, you know, thousands of dollars. They want toget in the commerce with these projects, because buyers are now going on Amazon, on they want to buy, they're going on, you know, ontoyour ecommerce store. They don't have time. Like you said, the millennial gendergeneration that at waiting. The third thing I'd like to share. Weare super, super bullish on anybody that's one to listen. I talked aboutconfigurators, and those configurators quote, builders, calculators, whatever you want to callthem. You and I were just talking about a good buddy of minefrom above, the fray, Noah Oakenberg. He connected you with Tom or,he connected me with Tom Paul. Tom was just a guest on yourpodcast. He's a company in Portland. They do a great job with withconfigurators. Chris Harrington, Presiden CEO of Jen outfit. Now they're great guestsfor you to consider on your program they're up in Milwaukee. They have theyare an e commerce firm for manufacturers. They do an incredible job with configurators. So let the ID buyer, that soul may land on your website,build your product and just check out in like not even have to call youor the RQ. You're now putting that sales process on your website, pullingit off of your plate. So anyway, so that's my that's our three prongapproach with e commerce for manufacturers. Yeah, I think that's really smartand, you know, touching on something you were saying a minute ago,and I've seen this a few times recently where we've been consulting a client andwe're always trying to push our clients into simplifying their service, other product offeringwhere they can like look at the where you actually profitable, where you justwhere you fulfill in orders, where the margins are low, but these customers, some of the Times the smallest customers, take up the most time and andyou're not even making money. Frankly,...

...but a lot of times the thingsthey're buying could be more a little more standard maybe. And so I'vehad customers say, well, maybe we could activate a distribution channel to handlecommerce here for these particular more standard product lines that are lower margin, andthen we don't have to have our sales people spending all their time servicing.Well, I think that's another argument for maybe where you could use e commerce. Right, could you simplify some of your service offerings and say we're goingto sell these standard because that's probably good enough for somebody at this price point. Right, I love it. I couldn't agree with you more and again, you know, I know from an you know we were having an engineeringconversation. Might be much different for us as marketers. It's very easy.Yeah, just you know, Henry Ford at you know, put it inevery any color you want, as long as it's black. Right. Iknow it's not that easy, but what you're saying is like if you takelike the a eighty twenty rule, you know. So if there are commodityproducts that that customer manufacturer is making and just like really start hammering down onthose particular products, those that can open up the door to so much youknow makes makes your life a lot easier when you walk into the manufacture likeHey, what's your key we you know, what are your keywords, what areyour course strengths? That up when now, when they focus on thateighty percent that can create their you know, now here's your potential keyword strategy.Now, potentially here's an ECOMMERCE strategy. We could put those products out thereand even when that engineer or that buyer like Hey, I see thatyou have this particular whatever circuit board or you have this particular product, it'sclose, but I need this. But because they found you on a marketplace where they found you with that keyword strategy, now we can have theconversation to dig deeper, to customize it a couple steps further, but boy, we're really close, you know. So that's I absolutely love what you'resaying there. That's really smart actually, and I have one client who iskind of doing exactly that. Where their main webs they have two websites.Their main website is very bigger, higher price point, more custom jobs andthis is their main business. Well, they own a really important keyword intheir space and they have built a website and e commerce site all around thatand they sell the commodity products and they don't make much money when they sellthem. But when somebody buys it, they fill out if they're filling outa forum, they're purchasing something of transaction happens in a relationship begins there andall of a sudden that is is the lead into turning them into a customerof really their their core service offering. And so sometimes the ECOMMERCE component ofyour business is not even going to be a profit center for you in anotheritself. It may be more of a lead generator for you to start conversationswith the right people. So I think you kind of have to reframe yourmindset about why you're maybe doing e commerce in the first place. Absolutely,that's absolutely brilliant. I love that strategy that you're suggesting there with, youknow, with that particular client and again, and it's just it's just a differentmindset for the manufacturer and again, you know, like you do withdozens hundreds over you over your career, and phenomenal operation patients. Boy,nobody does it better. They know that...

...widget inside and out, you know, and they're probably great leaders, good, you know, great with HR,great with operations, finance, all those other things. They just they'venever really needed a market themselves, and so this is just such a glaringgap. You know, I don't know if you'll relate to this, likewhen you started your business, I was kid around manufacturers. What's what hitretail twenty years ago is now hitting manufacturers today. So say like Main Street, your floors, plumber whatever, your everyday service providers. You know,twenty years ago, you know, Joe, I'm on enough to remember. Youknow, this thing called a phone book. You know, I don'tknow, maybe your I don't know, but there's this thing way back ahundred years ago called a phone book. You know, I could take thatwas my marketing campaign. I took an ad out in a phone book andmaybe I sponsored a little league team or you know whatever that is a retailer. That was my marketing campaign. Also, in this whole Internet thing came about. So as a plumber, floors one, so forth, they hadto hit this whole social media thing, website. You know, fifteen yearsago, right, manufacturers kind of skirted it at that's not this Internet thing'snot going to catch us. So now, unfortunately, they have to start thinkinglike a retailer almost, you know. So I love what you're saying andit's getting out of the box, getting creative and how you know whatyou're describing all those custom manufacturers, what they have. They might have apreparatory product. They have a preparatory process in right there. That could bethat preparatory process. That again, that can be your keyword strategy. That'swhat you want to focus on your website. That's what content that you know,the magic that you guys perform, that's what you want to focus onis you know that again, just coming back to like that twenty rule.What do you do best? Stay in your strike zone and exploit that.Let's talk a little bit more here about Keyword and keyword strategy, content strategy. I see the SEO landscape changing a lot over the last few years.It's becoming I mean the saturation of content is like increasing exponentially. It's becomingthat much more difficult to rank, and so it requires you to be alot more niched down and specific, and I know that I heard you talka little bit about that's I'll stop there. What's kind of your take on whereyou know, SEO, or search engine optimization, and content strategy fitinto this conversation? Yeah, when you started your firm in two thousand andsix, think about like, what did Google look like that then? Veryplain tax, right. You never saw an image, you never saw avideo. It was very plain, right. Why did you know? Now doa google search for flowers, shoes, a commodity, right, and whatare you going to see? Pictures, images, videos, all in.You know. Now it's like man, Google, what happened? Well,Google now has fierce competition. Amazon is as big of a cup asa search engine as it is a product distribute think about that. You know, we had a gentleman on our program Brian back he talked about sixty oversixty percent of product searches begin on Amazon. So, again, if your manufacturerand you in you're like, well, I don't do you know? Amazon'sat my house. You know, it's at my front door every day. That's consumer products, goods. It's how we survive through co of it. If you don't have some type of a presence. I just in again. I know there's a lot of exceptions,...

...but you're really putting yourself at adisadvantage, you know, when you think about that. So you knowfrom that standpoint. You know, I can go to Linkedin, is nowsearch engine. I could go to Instagram, I can go to pinterest. That'swhy there's so many images. Say, if you have a CNC Shop FabricateMetal Circuit Boards, then if I do those really broad terms, youa hundred percent. You're you know, the chance I was kid around.If anybody can see me, I have no hair. I'm like, ifyou want to come up on first page for like CNC machining, fabricating metal, you got a better chance to see me with hair. It's just notgoing to happen. Right. But if we did fabricating metal for Turbine Enginesin aerospace, or if we did printed circuit boards with conformal coding on,you know, Dada upt so what? In our training again, we tryto you know, I deal with a lot of digital immigrants, you know. So I'm a digital immigrant. I was born way before one thousand ninehundred and eighty. I'm going to assume that your digital native. I'm assumingright. So I'm fifty two. So I'm a digital immigrant. You know, I remember. You know your parents remember our a track players back ina day, right. So for digital immigrants it's just so much different thanfor the digital nave on that keep you know. So we try to keepit really simple with our with our training session, because we target a lotof digital immigrants. So we run through an example like this. All right, guys, if we did a search for shoes, here's what it lookslike. You know, five billion pages on Amazon, clutter clustered. Right. If I do run in shoes, maybe it went down like two billion, but it's still a ton of right. If I do pink running shoes,now I'm getting a little bit more specific in the search keeps going down. Now have a teenage daughter, if she's looking for pink running shoes withpurple shoelaces, being go. Now I have a specific match. And whatwe're encouraging the manufacturers that think about what are your pink running shoes with purpleshoelaces meaning? What are your printed circuit boards with a specific part or aspecific industry? What does your CNC machine part in aerospace, for Turbine?And you know. So take it, you know, a couple words furtherand I feel there are still tremendous seo opportunities. When you stretch that out. Yep, and and you know, the argument for lower volume but higherquality applies here. Right. It's I think you said something about finding yoursoul mate with a customer, so I forgot to exactly how you phrased it, but I mean that this is what we're talking about here. Right.Like, you serve a very specific type of customer who needs a very specificthing, and the more specific you can be with the content that you're creatingfor them and the you know, the the words you're using to describe whatyou do and who you sell, the more likely you are to attract theright people. And I'd much rather have ten people visit my website who fitmy ideal customer profile to a t then a thousand people that are could potentiallybe customers. Were probably most of them are. Right. That's exact right. and think like again, you have a wealth of talent on your team. And again I have to throw another plug at you. Guys. Youknow a lot of my marketers. When...

...you go out there, you knowin our space, you know we kild around and you know where the cobbers, kid with no shoes, marketers that have the bad website, bad socialpresence would I love about you, guys, at a girl of seventy six.You guys don't talk to talk, you walk to walk and when yougo to your encourage anybody listening. Check out shows website. You have agreat meet the team page and I got it. So and I know Iwant to stay on course. I know we have a I want to bemindful of time. I Love, love this was Ma. I've learned somuch from you just in our short period of time. You guys have weare a team, not a family, on your website and I absolutely lovethat. I think that is so important, where sometimes people kind of you know, companies, will blur that, oh, we're a family. Ilove that. You guys have that competitive spirit, that you're you're a team. And again, you a lot of journalism folks on your team. Youguys do a create a ton of content. I'm sure you see you have tonsof success stories where you've niched down into those key words and now,like you said, you know you're landing for or five six figure gigs foryour for your clients. Correct. So I think it's so important on thatquality. Again, think about that shoe example I gave. Like pink runningshoes, purple shoelaces. If one of your rock stars, you know,on your team, put out a great piece on, you know, somethingvery specific for a manufacturer and they landed that one key word and that engineerat bowing or Lockheed Martin needs that specific part or that's be specific piece ofmachinery and your team put out that content and now we met. You know, not magic happens. So absolutely we're there's still tremendous opportunities for manufacturers inthat space. Well, let's shift gears here for a second. Here,Kurt, I published something recently on Linkedin that starred the pot a little andthen it got got a nice response and I turned it into our newsletter,which one out to four thousand manufacturing people. Are So and the topic here,because I know I know you're smiling right now because I know you.You've got similar feelings to be on this ones. I want a riff onthis little bit. But I made the argument that you need to talk aboutpricing on your website as a manufacturer specifically, and that can mean a lot ofthings, but I would like to hear it kind of let you kickit off here. Like why do you assuming you agree, which I'm prettysure you do. Like tell us what your take is on why it's importantto actually list pricing or talk about pricing. Dude, I couldn't agree with youmore. When you when you put that post out, I was like, I gave you a standing innovation and I can't. I might have,and sometimes when I see a really good one, that's kind of my thing, I'll drop standing innovation. Hopefully I did that for your post. Iloved it. I think it's personally, I think it's critical and I knowit's an in a lot of folks are going to disagree with us. Totallyrespect that. Love it. You know, from my perspective put it out there. I played football hundred years ago. I almost say I was good,but I the honor a plate. So I'm here in New York,our football's you know, it's not like Texas or Ohio, from the PowerHouse states, but I played for a coach. My team was my teamin particular was awful. APPS off will probably was worst season of his career. But we played for a legendary, legendary coach. He had like threetitles in New York State, which was...

...a big deal. Big You know, the the top level of schools, whatever, and he would always preachthis, and maybe this will resonate with you. He said, guys,when you break out of the huddle, you should be able to walk upto the line of scrimmage, tell the person across the line from you exactlywhat play you're running and still kick that other person's brewer end and run toplay. And if you didn't, it wasn't because of that moment, iswhat it was because you didn't do sprints hard enough during practice, you didn'thit the weight room, you didn't do this, this, this and this, and so I you know, I'm fifty two. That was thirty.However many years ago. That still has stuck with me today when this pricingconversation or a lot of times people like, Oh, I shouldn't, I shouldn't. When I used to do linkedin trainings like six, seven, eightyears ago, when Linkedin was newer, and they're like well, we don'twant to put ourselves out there because what if people still are employees? I'mlike man, that's like. That's like hey, I don't want to havemy spouse on facebook because there he might find their prom date from like Ithink you have bigger issues going on. You know, if you're worried aboutyour spouse on facebook, and that's a house, you know you're worried.You know if you're worried about your employees on Linkedin, man, that's thatyou have bigger issues. I don't if I'm comparing an apple to an apple. Walk up to the line of scrimmage man. Tell the person across theline from you what play you're running. Tell them from your price, becausethe thing is, if your way out of League on the price, youmight be doing yourself a favorite because maybe the you know that wasn't a goodfit for you anyway. You know. But the thing is, for thetime that you're cut, but your competition needs a process that ourfq figure outthe price on their own. What you're doing is you're putting your sales andyour customer service on your website. What I preach constantly my book, mytraining, Webinar, everything as a manufacturer. How can you help your ideal buyer, that soul mate, make a bind decision on a Friday night atmidnight without having you wait for you to open up your doors on Monday?That's a competitive advantage. So I'll wrap up on that Jo. I justI love that post. I feel so strongly about it and I'm sure wecould find exceptions or yeah, you're right, maybe that item you shouldn't. Butagain, I talked about Brian Beck earlier. He has a book billiona Billion Dollar B tobe commerce. He has he talked about cardinal health andlike companies are putting six, seven figure items on ECOMMERCE, on a websitein the prices right there. So there's plenty of precedent to support it.If some of companies feel strongly against it, I respect it. But Man,I'm fearful if your competition is putting it out there that they're going towin to win the game, and that's that's just the thing. And youcan make this argument in so many areas of digital marketing and content. Likewhat do your customers need to make buying decisions? What information do they need? You got to put that out there and and you know they're probably peoplelisten right now seeing. Well, yeah, but you know, we sell afive hundred thousand, a million dollar equipment. That's all custom and it'sa yearlong bicycle and there's you know, there's plant managers involved in there's engineersand CFOs and CEOS and procurement and and there's nothing you can't put a priceon. I can't put a hundred that this cost a hundred twenty six thousanddollars and fifty cents, right or whatever.

But here's what you can do.You can give a range. If your product usually cost between fifty hundredfifty K, set those expectations and you're going to weed out price shoppers,like you said, we're just going to waste your sales teams time and you'regoing to further qualify those who can actually afford your solution. And then youknow, other things you're right, like explain the differences between if you're usuallybetween fifty and hundred fift K, what's the difference? What? Why issomething a hundred fifty verses fifty? That's a great way to educate your audienceon on different buying decisions they could make because, frankly, for the sperfect for some people in the s perfect for others and they want to understandthe difference. And then you know, another thing you can do is comparedto the alternative, like what's your what's your buyer used to seeing and what'sthe difference? You know. I one of our earliest clients was in industrialcodings manufacturer and they were, you know, some of their product was being usedto code a bridge that crosses the Mississippi River outside of St Louis andthey I remember having a conversation about total cost of ownership and how they hadto kind of bring that into their marketing because, like, you could buythis product to code this bridge with, you know, millions of depright,thousands, I don't how many gallons of paint, right, but to codea huge bridge and it's going to last ten years, or you could buythis product and it's going to last thirty years and the total difference in costthere over that period of time makes it a no brainer, right, andless and less. This is just a cash decision. So, like youcould, you could talk all day about that. You're probably having that conversationin like in sales conversation. So do it in marketing. Be The onewho educates your audience and who's going to be the first one that they pickup the phone and call? It's going to be you, right, becauseyou're helping them. You know what you're talking about. You're making that veryclear. So I'm just a huge advocate for making the buying process easy,being transparent. You Create Trust that way. Just so many benefits. So,dude, we're perfectly lying on that. And you know, and again,I just I really admire the work that you guys do and just Ilove keep pounding the pavement and you get it's just I can't wait to see. I'm so honored to kind of enter your circle. I can't wait.I'm through to be a part of this journey with you guys. Now Ipicked up fifteen years in and just I'm super excited to just see where youguys take the company. Just very exciting. Thank you. I appreciate that.Well. Is there anything we did not touch on that you want tomake sure we did? We've covered a ton, you know. And again, I'm throwing a lot of love your way. You know, go togrilla seventy six check and I you know, as as a fellow dad, Ijust I really admire you as a dad. You know, we talkedabout grace and Jack and I know you just had a baby charlie, andjust and again, I'm just I'm you're just such a good dude. I'mjust really, really pleased at you and I've connected. I'm looking forward toa long relationship with you and again, thank you for this opportunity to beon your show today. I'm just I'm just so touched and just thrilled ofwhere our relationship goes and I'm very excited, man. We're just we're very muchaligned. We're going to be pounding the pricing thing for our manufacturers andand so some day will, when we get together in person, will celebratesay hey, look at all these manufacturers...

...and I'll put it in our priceout there and you know, maybe you and I had a little piece todo with it. Right. I like it. I like it. Ithink that's great. Well, though, thank you for all the kind words. I feel the same way. It's great to cross pass here finally andexcited to be on your upcoming Webinar as well. So we'll do this.will be in reverse roles here that time around. So very cool. So, Kurt, can you tell our audience how they can get in touch withyou and where they can more learn more about what you're doing? Sure,yeah, I live on Linkedin. Great Place to find me. It's Iknows a lot of Curd Anderson's out there. So Kurt Anderson be the beat tail. I also am part of e commerce management and so it's a cooperativefor manufacturers. We do a lot of work with the manufacturing extension partnerships.I do multiple linkedin lives through the week and you know. So I wouldlove to connect with anybody out there and anybody looking for e commerce or,you know, trying to help with US digital transformation. What we do iswe work with the folks, we want to do it with you and thenkind of, you know, Trent, you know, educate them enough,like you said. You know, I love we were talking about teaching andeducating that. Then what we do is now we're going to graduate them,hand them off to like a grill of seventy six. Now you guys arereally going to blow it up, but now they can at least speak thatright language with you, you know. So that's that's our goal and that'sour role in the in the process. Awesome. I love it. Well, there's there's a place for what you're doing for sure, and I hope, hope we got the right people listening here will make sure to broadcast themessage. So very good. Well, I think we can put a wrapon it Kurt, I really appreciate you doing this. Absolutely my privilege.Wish everybody, true men to success. Go out there. Just keep crushingit, you know, focus on you know, connect with Joe on Linkedin, follow his content, foul. There's just so much information out there now, you know, to help educate the manufacturers. You're not in a youknow, here's the last message we could wrap up with Joe. You know, as a manufacturer, business owner. You know, remember when you andJohn First started out. You feel like you're alone, you're an Assilo.You know, you're on an island, just, you know, grinding.You know, supply chain, labor, shortage, covid so you know everything. There are so many resources out there. Connect with a guy like Joe Sullivan, connect with your local manufacturing extension partnership. There's just a lot ofresources. Hang out on Linkedin, collaborate, learn, enjoy and have a goodtime. You know, let's have a little fun. So we'll wrapup on that. I like it. Good message current. Once again,thanks for doing this and as for the rest of you, I hope tocatch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening tothe manufacturing executive podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribeto the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more aboutindustrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for bedb manufacturers at Gorilla Seventy sixcom learnthank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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