The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 1 year ago

Finding the Fit: How the Seller and Buyer Can Work Together so Everyone Wins w/ Ian Altman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Back in May, I wrote an article entitled Summer Reading 12 lessons from 12 books for 12 weeks. The author of one of those 12 books, Ian Altman, is my guest on this episode of The Manufacturing Executive!

A bestselling author and B2B growth expert, Ian started, sold, and grew his prior companies from zero to over $1 billion in value. He has since spent years researching how executives make decisions. Ian's modern approach has helped many businesses turn marginal growth into explosive growth and thrive where their competitors struggled merely to survive.

Ian and I talk about:

  • Why you should flip your sales message
  • The three questions you need to ask to make an informed decision
  • How to weed out wrong-fit clients
  • How to pivot away from in-person meetings during COVID-19

Resources we talked about:

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Show, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

If we know that that's how people makedecisions, what problems it solve, why do we need it? What's like that? Come aresult, then what the heck are we doing by leadingwith here's what we do as a company N hears how our widgit works? Welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here, you'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles and you'll learn from btob sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get Ino the show welcome to another episode of theManufacturing Executive Podcast, I'm Jo Sulliv in your host and a cofounder ofthe Industrial Marketing Agency, Garilla, seventy six. So back in May Iwrote an article titled Summer Reading Twelve Lessons From twelve books fortwelve weeks and in this article I pulled standout quotes from twelve ofmy all time. Favorite businessbooks today, I'm pretty darn excited becausemy guest is the author of one of those twelve books. So let me take a momentto introduce bestselling author and BTB growth expert en altman een started,sold and grew his prior companies from zero to over one billion dollars invalue. He has since spent years researching how executives makedecisions. His moderte approach has been instrumental in helping manybusinesses turn marginal growth into explosive growth and to help themthrive, where their competitors struggle and merely survive in is acoauthor of the best seller same side selling. Now, in its second edition,you can read hundreds of his articles on Forbes and ink and is a founder ofthe same sideselling academy, rated one of the top five sales developmentprograms globally. yeand welcome to the show, Jo thanks, forhaving me on, andI'm flatter that see. Originally, you...

...said Hey. I wrote this thing about thetop twelve books on business and I was expecting M to say, and none of thosepeople were available, so I have seen here. Instead, no, you made the list and you ere yeah.It's. I can't remember exactly how I stumbled across same side selling. Iwant to say I heard: Maybe you on a a guest as a gast on a podcast orsomething years, maybe five years ago or so, but the book was intriguing, I picked it upand immediately. It became one of my favorites for a number of reasons whichI want to get into today, but yeah and it's you know among a few things, I'dlove to talk to you about, but first could you give our listners a littlebit of background on you? Just you know, build on the INTHO. Tell us how youwound up where you are today. Well, the big thing I mean you talked about mywork. I started my first com, C N, housand, nine hundred and ninety three.We became a fast fifty company, one thousand nine hundred and Niney Eight,some of the fifty fastest gowing companies in the Washington DC region.We were also the only company on the list who was not a government defensecontractor and which is funny because once we hat the list we'd get all theseinbound prospecting calls from people talking about what we needed forgovernment contracting. We're we're not a government contractor. No, no, yournumber twenty one on the list, yeah we're not we're not in that space andwe built a software company, then starting in ninety eight. In additionto the core consulting business that we had and two thousand and five I gotapproached by some investment bankers are I New York. We saw the company forcash and stock and I served as Managing Director of the parent company. We grewthe value of the business from a hundred million dollars to actuallyabout two billion dollars in a little over three years, and I was Fong Twohundredsand miles a year. I wasn't spending time with my wife for my kidsand I just thought after a while. Why am I still doing this? I didn't have agood answer, so I stopped and people said what are you going to do now andmy first thought was we I'll just do the same sort of thing I'll just builda new company like that again and one...

...of my friends said you know a bunch of us were talking and anytimeour businesses were struggling to grow. You seem more excited about helping usfix something in our business than you were about your own business. Why don'tyou do that and I said, do what this ai well help. Businesses grow and I saidwell, there's a business for that and they said well. You didn't necessarilyneed that, but most of US yeah we go to experts in that type of space, and so Istarted speaking in was this probably two thousand and eight two thousand andnine something like that started speaking at events and bn dot eversince and so speaking and coaching and guiding people and how they grow theirbusinesses with integrity. It's frustrating for me to see thefrustration that people have with sales and marketing because it doesn't haveto be that miserable experience, sure absolutely, and so what came. First,the organization same sideselling and your training program or the book sothe book, the book we released the first version. I think it was in twothousand and fourteen o two thousand and fifteen, and so definitely the thespeaking ofverything came first. In fact, the first book I wrote was calledUpside downselling. That is a really shortbook that people can read to givesthem the gist of it's in that sense, how do you take non sales people andteach them some of the core principles of same sideselling before sanside sonexisted and and then I met Jack quarels, who spent two decades in purchasing apeterment and Jack, actually attended a workshop? I was delivering on sales, itwas the upside down selling workshop and I thought wow. This is cool Jack's,coming to kind of see. What's going on and see, you can learn something. Thereality is that jacket found that some of the vendors who they were willinglypaying much higher fees to than other vendors. The common thread was, theywould say: Oh yeah, I went through this program with this guy e and Alpman andJack want to understand what they were...

...being taught and when e came to theprograme he said well, this is all integrity based. In fact, this makesperfect sense. This isn't dishonest. This is totally honest and then we gotto know each other and said there are no books written from the perspectiveof the buyer and the seller. We should do this and you know, fortunately, it'sresonated with quite a few people and n enough to the point that you know wereleased the second edition about a year ago and it's been a verysuccessful road and I just think that the title resonates with people. It'slike. Oh that makes sense like you, can understand conceptually H, I getting imin the same side not on opposing sides, yeah, and I think that's what's sounique about it, having the perspective from procurement of the buyerside andthen the saleside, because there's I see it all the time with in my worldind the world of my customers where you're, you know it's like it's, thisbattle in the sale of buyer versus celler and there's this race to thebottom on price and everything yeah, it's one versus the other and and thewhole concept of your book, which I think Ou shows the perfect name for itis let's work together to figure out. If there's a fit, let's come to acommon solution that makes sense for everybody, so I just thought it was. Itwas so unique in that sense. Thank you, yeah! It's! It's fascinating thatalmost every book that I've ever seen on sales either uses a battle metaphoror a game metaphor yeah, and if we take the take the second one first in a game,there's a winner and a loser and in a battle the loser actually dies. Andthen we wonder why there's this adversaral tention instead of we usethe model or the metaphor of a puzzle it as look if you're putting a puzzletogether, you each have to be able to see each other's pieces or you'll neverbe able to put the puzzle together and if you're not trying to put the samepuzzle together, then there's just not a good fit, and so it Changese thedynamic. where it's less about. How do I convince this person that they needto buy for me? They just don't know it yet. Instead, it changes it to...

...look for the right organizations were agreat fit we're at the RU. We're not a great fit for everybody, so I don't yetknow if I can help you, but if you're facing these sorts ofproblems, I'm happy to learn more to see if I can help makes it so thatyou're intantly on the same side yeah. I love that you know one of the biggestissues that I see with sales in the manufacturing sector, where thelisteners of the show live and our customers at gorilla is you know they,everybody defaults to talking about themselves. It's we do this and we sellthat and our people are the best and our competitors are phonies, and youknow it's all about us right and what I love about. What you call the same sidepitch is that you kind of flip the positioning statement or the the salesmessage on this head, a d you lead with the customers issue. I was wonder ifyou could talk about that, a little bit sure well, for starters, that examplethat you give of people always talking about themselves and here's what we doand here's the way we approach the world and everyone elseis evil is whencompanies suffer from what I like to call Acess displacement disorder andthat's where they persodoing. The selling believes that somehow the axissof the earth is shifted and now the world revolves around them and itdoesn't in fact, if anything, the world revolves around our client. So one ofthe things in researching how executives making approve decisions,one of the things that we did is we ren. We run people through an exercise andI've done this exercise with over tenthousand executives around the worldfrom companies ranging from you know, relatively small startups, under amillion dollars, revenue to multibillion dollar multinationalsvirtually everywhere on the planet, except for the continent of Africa, andwe haven't begon anywhere in the Antarctic. So outside of that, I gotyou covered and we ask people. Well, let's see some one of your team comesto you and wants to spend money on this thing and Calleid a deserting blad. Itdoesn't matter what it's called and they say we're going to spendtwentythsand dollars. It takes forty five days for the vendor to implement.It requires no resources whatsoever on...

...our part and they give us a tenyourguarantee. The challenge I give people is whate are the five questions youwould have to have answered to be comfortable, making an informeddecision, tohther approve or deny that request, and I let people work in teamsto come up with their list of five. Then they narrowd down to their topthree and they ask the same three questions everywhere, no matter of thesize of the company matter where they are Gographic and the three questionscomig down to dis, the first one is: What problem does this solve so thinkabout you're going to spend money well that, since what problems is solvedwhich is immedately faulld by the second question of? Why do we need it,which is what's the what happens if we don't solve? That issue mean what's theproblem and then what's the consequence of not something that problem and thenthe third question is: What's the likely result or outcome if we makethis investment well so and by the way, the distantforth and all this is what are the alternatives and the reason why it's adistant forth is that if you enter those first, three questions well, thefourth one becomes implied so the vendor who you're in total, sink withabout what problem they're trying to solve for you and why you need theirhelp, who ads also be the same venner? Who Delivers the best most likelyoutcome for you? That's your vendor! That's the one you pick! So if we knowthat that's how people make decisions, what problems it solve, why do we needit? What's the like? They come a result, then, what the heck are we doing by leadingwith here's, what we do as a company and hears how our widgit works and it'sitss, not a line. withhowt people make decisions, so, instead, what do we leadwith? Well, our clients come to us when they're facing these types of problemsthat have these types of consequences for the right organizations. We deliverthis specific type of outcome, and now I need to disarm the notion that I'mjust there to sell something. So I say, but the way we approach, that is theright fit for everybody. I don't Yeu know whether or not we can help you,but if those are issues youre facing I'm Hav to learn more to see whether ornot we might be able to help, and that structure is what we call the same sidepitch its and chapter for the book. If...

...you search, if you Google same sidepitch, you can probably find exserps of this for free. If you don't want to getthe book, it doesn't matter, it's not about it's just more. If people havethe book, they know where, where to find it in the book. So the idea isthat we, the same side pit, falls this construct of entice, disarm anddiscover. So first, we entice by sharing problems that we solve withdramatic or extraordinary results. We then disarm the notion that we're justthere to sell something, and then we trigger a discovery phase to learn moreabout their situation, to see whether Ornot we might be able to help so yeah,it's a great model, a great infrastructure for doing it, and I cansee I love the the puzzle piece analogy,because if you, if you can just blatantly say these, are the types ofcompanies that were good at helping, you know these are the problems thatthose types of companies typically experience. This is how we can helpsolve those problems, but not everybody's the right fit for us all ofa sudden. You start to weed out companies that aren't the right fit. Iimagine it makes you more efficient in your sales process, because now you'respending time with companies that actually could be the right customersright sure well, and the idea is this- is that what people used to what theyused to be taught and and by the way Wel we're going to we're going to use g?Seventy six as an example. So when a second I'm going to ask you well whatare the problems that your clients would face? So you have a second tothink about it, a right WATWA. What I want you to think about is this is thatif you're, if you're, leading with what people have off een topp in the past,is, will you ask and open it? A question like what keeps you up atnight and you might ask somebody what keeps you up at night and they say: Oh,my dog licks himself, all right wellwell. What do you have for that?You have a solution, no and then you're fishing going. Oh well. What else? WellI get concerns about xynz yeah. We don't do that either and now you'refishing for an opportunity, as opposed to, if you think about it, my guess issome of your best clients we're facing...

...a problem that they weren't even awareof until you helped them realize that it was an issue, and so, if you say tothem, what's your biggest problem, they might not even realize it ou. It's likeone of the questions that will ask people is well so Zerto ten. How well do your sales people perform and no oneever gives e ten. It's usually like a five okay, so you know how much of thatdo you attribute to a? How much of that? Do you attributeto a hiring problem and how much woul you attribute to a skills problem? MeyGo! It's probably like eighty percentskills? Okay. So what are you doing to invest in those skills? And it's likeyou know the headrs. It goes oh right, but but if you aske them hey whatYhourd biest challenge, they would never say it's the selling skillsideyeah oftentimes. It is so going back to the same side pitch if you're, okay,with it Yeah Wat, we'll use you we'll use your businesses exampire. What so, so, what's the biggest challengethat you solve for your clients? So I would say the biggest challengesthat they're not getting in front of enough of the right people from theright companies, and why is that a problem? Because, if they're, not if they're not doingthat, then they're re lying on their existing customer base or referrals andare often stuck serving customers who are not profitable and they wind upkind of on this hamster wheel, Yep, okay, so so yo, your same side pitchmight be well. Manufacturers come to us when ther their message of the amazingproxand servicethat. They have aren't getting in front of the right clients,and that means that either theire inferior competitors are winning thatbusiness or at a minimum. The company is forced to just keep trying toharvest existing clients who eventually run out of additional things.You can sell your existing clients for the right organizations. They tell usthat we deliver marketing solutions...

...that attract those clients, fill thetop of their funnel and give them a disproportionate share of mind fromthose ideal customers. But the way we approach that it's not the right fitfor every company, so I don't yet know if I can elp your manufacturing company,but if that's someon you're facing I'm HAP to learn more to see if we might beable to help, and so that's what it sounds like is first understanding whatare those problems that we solve and then what the consequence is now I justkind of winged it. So it may not be perfect, but it might not suck well.You know what I'm glad W we're recording this, because now I can justtranscribe it and copy and pacte right into our website right now that that'sright on the money, I mean it's exactly the convers. I can understand the powerof having that conversation and and when you've, especially when, whenyou're in a niche- and you have a very specific type of customer- and you knowthat customer really well well, you've seen all these patterns over time rightand so it's while you can't make assumptions aboutwhat your prospects need. You've seen these problems before and and you'reable to speak to them. So absolutely in my business it comes down to it's theearning attention side. It's people feeling T at they're commoditized, sowow we've got someof, that's headand shoulders about the competition, butour client see us as a commodity. Just like everybody else or there's thiswhole shift of. How do we shift the conversation from price to valuebecause everyone wants to beat us up. Those are the types of things that Ihear time and time again. So that's when people say what do you do? Well,my clients are usually facing one of these problems: BOMP BUM BU and if Idoesn't resonate it's probably not the right fit today doesn't mean it w'll,never be, but they're, probably not the right client. Today. There's a line from your book that Ihave I've quoted. I've had a picture of your book. Up there, I've had the quotehighlighted in a number of number times: I've been in front of our own clients,and hopefully it's sold you some books along the way without you realizing it,but the line that I really love, because itjust speaks so well to a lot of things...

...that we preach, AC, Arilla and try toteach our clients is this. It says you said the goal of being an educator isnot to convince but to include a prospect in your perspective orknowledge base so that you build a common mutual understanding, Yep- and Ijust love that quote so much because it's everybody in my world in thismanufacturing world they just default like we like, I said earlier to talkingabout themselves and that's all you see in their marketing. It's Broshiremarketing, its websites filled with product pages, which you need thatstuff. I'm not saying you don't need it, but wha we emphasize so much is that you have totake these elements of a consultative sale and you got to bring them downinto your marketing process as well, because the first touchpoint that a lotof your future customers will have with you is the content you publish and thethings you say and so Iwas just kind of curious to hear you K Ow your take onthat particular quote in this idea of Eing an educator. Well, my I always saythat the best quotes in the Buk Jack pobby wrote, but the the the ideabehind the idea behind this is that when your clientor prospect doesn'tdecide to do business with you, they decide not to spend money with you. Oneof two things has happened: either. They don't believe that the problemthat you're talking about solving for them is that big of a deal at least notcompared to other things on their play, or they don't believe in the result oroutcome that? U That you're, allegedly going to deliver or both, and so when companies talk about here,aure features and heare our capabilities and all this wizbang stuff.What's the client wondering what problems is solve? Why do we need it?What's the like? They outcome a result. So the idea is that if you believe inthe issue, the impact of the results and the client doesn't doesn't count.Similarly, if they believe in it, but you don't, it doesn't count. So it'sgot to be a mutual understanding. If you both are on the same page aboutwhat problem you're trying to solve, if...

...you're, both in the same page aboutwhat happens, if they don't solve it, and you both have consistentexpectations about what the result should be, then there's a level oftrust if you think about, if you're buying from somebody and you haven't,had a meaninful conversation about what the results need to look like. What'sgoing through the customers mind, the client is thinking yeah, but do theyreally understand what we're trying to accomplish? But if you ask thequestions up front about what a success look like and how we're going tomeasure it, then it's just the client saying yeah, I think they're actuallygoing to fall through or not, but at least everyone's on the same page aboutwhat it is you try to accomplish. You know one of one of the things that Ihaveen share, especially with people in the manufacturing side is so. Let's sayyou have two different vendors. One Vendor is asking you about: Who needsto be involved in actually making a purchase? The other vendor says whatcould put the results at risk, and what are we going to measuretogether to make sure that we get the right results for you? Well, whichvendor? Would you rather deal with the person who's focused on the sale of thefender WHOs focused on the results? Right, obviously, the result side rightand, and then I'll say well, so would you be woning to pay more for thevendor is focused on results and people almost universaly sal yeah I'd pay morefor that? Okay, how much more the most common answer is somewhere between tenand twenty percent? More then, I asked the following question,which is so: How much less would you have to pay for it to be a good deal,but you don't get the results that you need. The answer is it doesn't matter like?If I don't get the results, I need it was a waste of time and resources, letalone the money, so when companies can learn how to pivot to focus on resultsinstead of focusing on just getting the sale. That's when everything changes,that's when clients routinely pay more for your services than for otherpeople's there's a whole thing that we don't have time to discuss today. Thetalks about differentiation and how do...

...you stand out over the competition sureyeah? I love that well in we are recording this in August of twothousand and twenty. The world is still upside down in a lot of ways and itlooks like it may be for a while one of the biggest struggles that I'm seeingamong DDB manufacturers is they're, not sure what to do with this big gap.That's being left by the absence of trade shows, and not only trade showsbut just being able to get on a plane and fly across the country to see acustomer prospect. So many of these companies are reliant on that in person,interaction, and so I'm curious from you know your perspective. What you're,seeing with the companies you consult and what you think you know theseorganizations can be doing in the meantime to fill that void. It'sinteresting in the in the same side, siging academy, we do a monthly coachesCorner Callin, one of the most prevalent topics of lade has been so.What do we do when we can't have inperson meetings when we can't rely onnetwork and when we used to get eighty percent orour leaves to these tradeshows that now don't exist? What do we do, and so what we need to do isimmediately pivot to think. Like our customers, now, the smart company isalready worth thinking like their customers, but they, you know, there'sstill time to catch up, which is okay. One of the questions that our clientswould ask my friend, Marcus shared in his book. They ask you answer, you knowMarcus talks, you're in the marketing world, you and Denaly Know MarcusisLove Love, they ask you answer, love and, and so the whole idea is that howdo you create content? That is meaningful for your cliner prospect andit comes down to Marcus talks about his big five of content, marketing five keytopics that move the needle and one of them has talked about price, one ofthem talke about Besof and comparisons, rankings and reviews. I think it is,and so the idea is to make it so that you're speaking to the problems, yousolve not your features and capability.

So if, for example, you did yo t, youdid a CAS study that talked about how you solve this problem for anotherorganization it used to be when people did CAS studies, they would write alittle bit about what the client was doing and they would write. You knowthree or four hundred pages about themselves. Now, smart, they are asmanufacture and then in the end it would say and contact ust for moreinformation and instead, what I suggest is you condense things, and you say so:here's Tha Manufacturing Company there or you know whether it's a manufacture,whether it's a you know wherever their incline is here's this organization.They were having this problem and here's why that problem was soimportant notice. What am I starting with? What problem were they trying tosolve? Why do they need to do it? Then? I give you an entire sentence,not a compound sentence, but a sentence. It says they came to us for help andthen you talk about the result and outcome they ended up with which barelymentions your product or service. So it says when it came to us and they usethe assertain Blat a two thsand, an twenty today they're able to do thisdown. They've captured more market share, they've shortened their time tomarket they've, reduced errors. They've, you know improved efficiency, they'vetheire dogs and cats now peacefully get along together, whatever it is, andthat's all great. So somebody reads that, and they say wow, that's reallygreat it could be a video could be, could be text doesn't matter afterthey've consumed that content. If they're only going to look at that, ifthey're having that same problem, so now we're alread we're alreadynarrowing down our filter to the right people and then what happens is theysay? Wow Yeah? I didn't think about the consequence of that yeah. But you wehave the same consequence and wow. I'd should like to have that same outcome.Only the vendor didn't describe the exact solution. So if you're that customer, what do youdo you either pick up the phone or you email, the company and say how did yousolve that...

...and then it's about training, the rapwho answers that call to not say: Oh here's how we solved it, but insteadsay what was it about that case, te that peted your interest andimmediately talk about what's important to them as a customer? Not Talkingabout your stuff, perfect love, it so case studies, you know but focused onthe problem and the outcome so case. It's basically it's just taking all ofyour marketing mindset and shifting it to a focus on what problems do we solve?What's the information that people are wondering about and guess what, if it's?If there's, if there's a certain problem, you might say here three waysto solve this problem and guess what you might start by saying. Lookoftentimes people come to us to solve this problem and that's something thatwe do, but in the event that you can't afford to do it, the way that we do ithere are two or three alternatives that could work for you a because the personwho's going to go through all the headaches to do it. The hard way,they're going to do that anyhow sure sure, but other people are going tolook and save those three ways. Look like a lot of work, we're not doingthat. Let's just call these guys and and then you're narrowing your field.So if you just put out a whole bunch ofmarketing heyght that says here's how cool we are no one's going to careright. If, instead, you say okay, how do we attract the right interest byspeaking to the problems that these people are facing day and day out thenyou're onto something we created in the? In the same side, Son Academy, Icreated a course called growth in crisis that we give people you nowpeople can access for free es, go to the website and you know same side,soing Academycom and you can click and and get that course for free yeah. Oneof the first things I talked about is that in this type of crisis, marment yourgoal first and formust is to be helpful, and so I thought it'd be kind ofcynical. If I then charge for the course so sure we just we just made Iavailable for free, but it's the whole idea of...

...how can you help other people and talkabout the problems that they're facing and how to solve them and the rightpeople will come back and do business with you T it's okay, yeah makes sense,Wut and so wit, yeah it with in person of as tra, shows out the door socreating content. That's actually helpful: How do you get it out therefrom your perspective? Are you an inbound guy and outbound guide? Youlike Bost Ouse, I oa Mot. So if you already have a good list, then you'resharing information and you're constantly seaking feedback het. Here'sthis piece of content we shared. What else would you like to hear? I uselinke in live and so at the end of every Weenk in live I'll postin en sayswhat other topics would you like to hear about, and then you know, becausethe idea is I'm just trying to serve that audience. Yeah and you know whatare the questions? Do you have, you know hey place? Dump the Gesser liketell me, you know, ask you question that you don't think we can answer that.Oh, like here's, a really hard one, because if you're the person they'recoming to for a lot of answers, then you're probably also the person goingto come now. If you basically solicit questions for things that have nothingdo with your business, that's going to be harder, but it can be related to it.I I think I think Marcus talks about. I think it's Colombia, sports or one ofthose counnt be outof, where I think as a whole, APP thet they produced on nots,I'm like how to tie knots the say: Well, they don't sell rope. It's like you'remissing the point. Their audience is people who are on boats and a campingin this, and that who would like an APP on how to white tie this type of not ofthat type of, not so they're serving their audience. So it's relevant, butif they were, you know if they were posting, something about you know doingsuvide, cooking their audience, wouldn't care because not o boatthey're, probably not firng up to Suvi, of course, yeah. It's all aboutunderstanding, the customer and being a resource resource to them. Sure love it. Well, you n. This has been a fantasticconversation. It's been an honor having the Pportunity to talk to the coauthorof one of my asolute favorite business...

...books. Can you tell? Can you sell usthe best place for listeners to find you online, where you'd send them andwhere they could pick up a copy of same side selling? Absolutely you can pickup the same sideselling just about anywhere. Books are sold Amazon Timesto be the one of the most popular places now, but you can also get t atthe inthe bookstores as well. My you know, if you go to en altmoncom you'llget me or same side selling academy gets everything on the Academy side andpeople can always reach out with any questions, because sometimes peoplewill read the book or hear something and they'll post a question, and it'samazing because ill usually get questions and say well, I'm sure Iandoesn't actually read these and then, like I get the email an I responde andsay. Why do you think I don't read these like? Oh you read them, I'm like!Well, you said it to me. If you send it to F, you send to Info. Maybe I'll readit. Maybe I won't. If you send it to me, I'm probably going to read it yeah,that's great, perfect! Well, EAN thanks Itton for taking the time out of yourweek to do this really appreciate it. You met you thanks for the GreatQuestions Awesomeis for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episodeof the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sale strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools, specificallyfor B to B manufacturers at Gerilla. Seventy SIXCOM AAWOR. Thank you so muchto listening until next time.

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