The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 1 year ago

How to Create Video Marketing that Drives Results in the Industrial Sector w/ Danny Gonzales

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

By 2022 online videos will make up more than 82% of consumer internet traffic. That's 15 times more than in 2017, according to a recent study by Cisco.  

Video is how your buyers want to consume information, so it's exactly how you need to deliver it to them. 

On this episode of The Manufacturing Executive Show, Danny Gonzales, CEO of both Industrial Sage and Optimum Productions, talked about driving growth through video production in the industrial sector. 

Here's what we discussed with Danny:  

  • How some industrial companies are using video to their advantage already 
  • Shifting your message from traditional marketing to the way buyers buy now 
  • How salespeople can make one-to-one messaging videos using their webcams and distribute them via video cards 
  • The way to get started in video marketing right now (and now's the perfect time!)  

Resources Mentioned in the Episode: 

Industrialsage.com 

Monique Elliot of Schneider Electric 

Malika Waller of Landis+Gyr 

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Show, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

What better way to do it than to youknow, put a camera on other people like them who are experiencing these sameissues and thelet them tell their story. Welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here. You'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles and youill learn from BTO B sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get into the show, welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, I'm Joe Sullivan your host and a cofounder of the Industrial MarketingAgency Gerrilla. Seventy six. There are a lot of reasons whe. I'm super excitedabout our episode today, which is an interview with an expert and videoproduction and specifically inside of the industrial sector. But let me throwa pretty staggering statistic out there before I introduce him. A recent studyby CISCO SHOWS THAT BY T wo thousand and twenty two online videos will makeup more than eighty two percent consumer internet traffic and that'sfifteen times higher than it was in two thousand and seventeen, and there are alot of stafts like this out there that just really point to content consumpting shifting to videoand numbers like this just kind of blow my mind, but you can see it happeningall around you, you search for something, an Google, you scrollthrough your link in feed, and you see more and more video. So the reality isthis: If this is how your buyers want to consume information, then it'sexactly how we need to be delivering it to them. So let me take a moment tointroduce Danny Gezalez of industrial sage and optimum productions. Is anAtlanta Native Dany discovered his passion for video production, wilevolunteering as a missionary in Mexico after high school later, his extensivecareer experience in the world of digital video creation and marketingwith companies throughout Georgia led him tofound optimum productions, a fullservice, video marketing company in...

March of two thousand and seven Danny's personal mission in life is notonly to spurk creativity and drive results, but also to be activelyinvolved and to consistently present positive and meaningful messages forthe betterment of our local community and the world at large. Danny has overfifteen years of experience in marketing strategy and video productionworking nationally and internationally. Maintaining a detailed marketingstrategy, meaningful business, insights and creative vision gives Danny theability to routinely exercise his left and right brain equally on TA, dailybasis for his clients, his unique talents, approach and accomplishments,or on matches. He Continually Garners Award winning results, including ninetelly awards for client productions, he's driven by results, ry andultimately, solving clients challenges with innovative video solutions. Dannyresides intocoming Georgia with his wife Julie and they have been blassedwith four beautiful children Daniel. So enjoye spending time with his familyplaying golf cooking on the big green egg flying his drone watching moviesand racking up hours in the air with his private pilots license Dannythanks for joining us. Hey. Thank you for having me super excited to be hereawesome. So it's always interesting to learn a few little nuggets about peoplethat you'd have never otherwise known. I got to ask you about your pilot'slicense, yeah. So that's a just a awesome hobby of mine that I was youknow to one of those. What do they say? You know those bucket list item things,so I got it a couple years ago, after putting it off and putting it off andputting it off, because you know I was busy and then anyways was AI. You knowwhat I don't think in the last several years, I've gotten any less busy, so Ineed to go ahead and do this so yeah. I got a couple years ago and I absolutelylove it. It's a great way to kind of you know, take your mind off things nd,and you know I what is actually an interesting aside that I've kind oflearned anecdotally after getting this license, there's actually a lot ofmanufacturers, a lot of founders and cos if er, pilots as well, which I downot yeah. I didn't know that at time,...

...then it would just come up all the timein conversation, you go to a conference fro me like hey. So what is Thas in abeach king air? Like Oh yeah, you know. Oh that's really funny and Oh you knowyou know Bob over there he's got a TVM, you know eght fifty like Oh wow, that'scool and you know and it as just this small little. You know I don't know.Maybe it's because of like you know, part engineering and part of the justjust sense of freedom and their entrepreneurs and there's somethingthere. I think but yeah I love it. It's awesome. Well, a nice way to you know,start conversations with the right people. If, if there's some, you knowsome overlap, there, that's pretty cool exactly. How often do you get up in theair? Not Enough, so I would say you know. Lately it's been a maybe once aweek you know maybe a couple times dinduringthe month so yeah I just I've nothing. I don't flyanything FANCI, it's a little little to seeter diamond PDIAMOND, twenty, it's likekind of glider profile. So it's pretty big and lightwayg doesn't go super fast,but it's a lot of fun. Awesome love it! Well. I stumbled across industrial sagea few years ago and I was immediately drawn to all the video content that youguys produce and you know like like in the intra I o sort of mentionen there'sjust more and more and more video content emerging all around useverywhere. We kind of are especially online and you know you kind of see twoends of the spectrum on one end, there's all the homemade stuff thatpeople are shooting on their iephones, which for a lot of purposes, is great.It's video is accessible to the average person now and it has its placerecordings of zoom meetings of this year, in particular, ever since covidhit and then on the other end of the spectrum. There's a always been thissort of super high budget, Bran story type of stuff. You know multipleprofessional, videographers, lots of post production and there's therehasn't been a lot in between. I feel like a lot of sense. It's been sort ofboth ends of the spectrum and I think what caught my attention with you guysis you're, bringing that professional quality video production into a really.You know: sort of human, tangible,...

...authentic. You know setting withconversations in the interviews that you do with with manufacturing experts-and I noticed also you know not too long ago, I' MODAX. You guysinterviewed something like a hundred fifty manufacturing people, and so Ijust love your approach there and I'd love for you to first sort of kick thisoff my telling your listers a little bit about industrial sage and how youcame to be and then we'll sort of dive into video production yeah. So soindestrial sage essentially was what I dub as the great experiment and thereally here's the back story on it. So the set that you're seeing I you knowif you're looking at the video I bought a couple years ago, you know, I guess,to set the stagees opten productions is traditionally a you know, VideoMarketing Agency, that I've had since two thousand and seven and we kept running inta challenges wherecompanies would need to. You know, do like a town hall or do some sort of youknow more stage, type of content. That would be you know, internally, forcorporation or externally and Y. U Youd, go to you, know a conference room oryou go rent a hotel room and it was just really hard to make it look greatwithout spending a ton of money. So what we did is taid hey, why don't weinvest in something and then they can come here and we build a platform theycan go off of, but it's one of those things that it's really hard to sellsomething you can't see. So we said all right. Well, let's show people how youneed to be shaping your content and why you need to be doing it on an ongoingbasis, and why, specifically, we feel that video is a huge, valuable assetand there's multile reasons for that which will get into so. We said: okay,let's create our own show and it was either going to be basically localbusiness stories in the Atlanta area or something that was going na be littlebit more focused and we have a had a lot of clients in the industronalmanufacturing space and Wi said you know what let's focus on that: let's gothere and that's thessenially what happened? The goal was really. It was aone was as a weekly show where interview you know executives anddifferent people in the sales and marketing space in the Manufacturiindustrial areas, and it just kind of g...

...grew from there and then you knowwithin the last year or so maybe een before that started, making a littlebit more of a pivot. As you know, companies started coming to US andsaying hey: How can you guys help us and how can you you know? How can weget on your platform? We'd love to come in and we'd like to do a series, butmaybe not on sales are marketing, but on you know, Erp or doing something onyou know lean len, six sigma or what have you so we are have since started.Making a pretty big pivot and the goal of industrial stage now is really to bean open platform or, basically you know companies bable to come in and be ableto contribute content. It's for the it's for the the professionals. Thinkof a Cheddar or buzz feed kind of type play were kind of creating that for theindustrial space. So that's where you know I know you guys have you've gotsome articles you've put on industrial sage. It's great. We've got videoconcby of other companies that are coming in and they're starting to kickoff their own series. That'll live underneath the industrial stage bannerand that's really the goal. I think that the unfortunately, I think themanufacture, industrial space, typically kind of is like the redheadedStepchild when you look at agencies typically N at marketing agencies, PrWhatnot, because they think it's not cool and they think it's. Oh it's justdirty and Grimy, and you know, and there's real sentiment to that, becausethe otherwise there wouldn't be work force development issues that they have,where they're trying to attract new labor, A and new talent into the space,because there was an image there is an image factor, so we believe I have beenin. I can't tell you how many ar warehouses and manufacturing facilitiesand plants- and I think that the what is going on is amazing and I just thinktheir story has not been told well and when you start telling it in a betterway and you put a good light on it. It O totally changes changes theperspective and it totally flips the script. And so that's that's reallyessentially. Sort of our our goal is to really just avangelizing. You ow saywhat is happening out here is amazing. It's awesome. I love it yeah. You know,I think, in a lot of ways W as somebody's been running in theagency that is focused on manufacturing...

...for more than ten years now you see ingeneral, BTB manufacturers kind of lagging behind on marketing technology,and you know that's that's kind of across the boards with their websites.It's with you know the idea of content production, that's educational innature, rather than Broshire type of content, and I think from what I'veseen the same applies and video, and so what's interesting, is right. Now, Ou'e sort of at this point, where anybody who can embrace video right now isreally going to separate themselves from from others who are out there. SoI'd be curious to hear you know what your observations are around, how yousee video starting to enter the industrial sector more? What arecompanies doing? How are they using it to their advantage? Absolutely yeah.It's a huge topic of interest right now I mean, and it was before, butobviously you know because of the whole covid situation, everything it's beengaslete a lot more obviously, and so what we're seeing is ithis. There'sthings kind of across the spectrum and it depends on where n theseorganizations are here- and you know, you've got a lot of companies thathaven't really done a whole lot of video, and maybe what they've done isan itentity video. You know some corporate identity, piece or brandingpiece. This is us and we've been Aroud, one thousand nine hundred and fifntythree in the NDDATA. You know with the big authoritative voice and that youknow it's very corporate image to product videos to by product at it's very feature:function, kind of driven. So it's a little bit more like how it worksversus you know the results that it ou know achieves kind of thing. So youknow in the basic form of that all the way to some of the bigger players arecoming in and they really gut jump, jumping into thought, leadership, type,content, storytelling and- and really you know, if you really look at whereBTC companies traditionally market, you know, tha, the bigger manufacturers andindustrial companies are leaning towards that's the direction that we'regoing and there's typically there's a little bit of a misknomer that a lot ofpeople think well, you know we're Bei to be. We sell, you know it's not likeconsumer, so we don't need to have all...

...the big flashy stuff. Well, the realityof it is is a lot of these comes are starning to realize that you knowyou're actually selling to another human. Yes, it maybe a btobe productwith a lot of Zeros at the end of it, but you know: There's still a motion,an the still interaction that happens there and that doesn't you know thatthat should not discount matter of fact. You know you have a great opportunity Obe able to stand out. So if you can, you ere mentioning you know a lot F.people are doing, zoom calls and iphone stuff, and I think, there's a greatplace and there's a super strong purpose for that, provided that it'sattached to a strategy. But what happens? If you really want to standout, you got to start thinking outside of the box, and this is why you'reseeing a lot of storytelling, I think that you know like Granger, for example,they did. A great series is several years ago. They did. This was everydayheroes and what they would do is they were focusing on their customers, butthey weren't talking about their customers. You know like it wasn't like atraditional customer testimonyl like Oh tell us how amazing we are. It was allabout. You tell we want to know like what you guys are doing and they didn'teven mention really bringing any products or even say: Hey, granger S,amazing with us. It was just focusing on the customer and just sharing their stories, and Ithink that's that if I were to boil down you know video content and evenjust marketing in general, for manufacturers in Industral, where theyreally need to flip and really need to Hin is traditionally marketing has beenwe're. Amazing, we're the eight hundred foot pound gorilla, we've been arond,SI ne Housand, nine hundred and twenty five and our brand stands for you knowit's all about our brand, and this stands for we're strong and you knowwe're consistent and we're innovative and the reality of it is the way thetbuyers buy. Now that that's not how they buy, and so you have to shift yourmessage to you know. What's in it for me, you have to go out and to solveyour customers challenge to bring value to them, and so you kind of have tocome at it from from a different angle, and I think right now is a very pivotalmoment where a lot of manufacturers, you know you're going to see the oneswho are really going to succeed where...

...they flip that and they start saying.Okay, we need to we need to. We need to do this first. Ee Want T, say: Noforget it we're just we're going to be stick to that. So that's kind of whatwe're saying you know across the board. There's you know, but there's a lot ofthings sort of sort of in between they answer your question. Oh yeah, I meanthere's so much good stuff that packed into what you just said. I mean thething I always say is: Nobody cares who you are? Nobody cares what you do untilthey believe that you know you can identify with the issues they'reexperiencing and the things are trying to achieve and the questions are tryingto get answered, and I mean what better way to do it than to you know, put acamera on other people like them who are experiencing these same issues andlet them tell their story, you know, make it tangible, make it very humanand relatable. And what happens then is you know it's? It almost seems a littlecounter intuitive. If this is not ur your way of thinking about the messageyou broadcast your audience, but what actually happens is that's. What'sgoing to engage people and then they're going to start looking at you, you knowif you're, the one who's sort of providing really helpful informationand examples of others like them and how there's there's something theirproblems will you're the facilitator of all this helpful information. Now andyou're gonna be the natural you know first person they call and they'retrying to decide. You know how are we going to solve our problem and who canhelp us with that? So I love everything he's just said there awesome yeah. No,I mean it's, it's that's the way it's going sototally so telling a story. You know putting putting the spotlight on one ofyou know your customers and not having them talk about you so that that's oneway to do it h, t loke. What else are you seeing you know what? How else areyou seeing? You know video being used effectively by manufacturingorganizations, try to make this tangible, for you know for listers asmuch as you can absolutely so. I can tell you one thing right now that Imean there's a lot of different ways. I May BOUTL FOCUSD on to one the firstone is making sure you, the companies are having more. Their content, is morerap around their sales and eblement...

...peace. So typically wwe'll start offwith you know the the classic clash between marketing and sales. Typicallyin the manufacturing space marketing makes the specksheets and you know,does the trade show booth and that's about it, and then you have this fightbetween sales and marketing. Saying you knowsell, saying hey, I need this andwhy the heck tdid you produce that that doesn't make any sense. There's noconnection, heres, no synergy, there's no strategy. So what we're seeing isyou know if you start getting into the mind as a marketer you', getting intothe mind of your sales team, saying what do you guys need you know? Whatcontent can we provide aboult to help facilitate your the help? siltake inthe sales process is a huge win, and so specifically, maybe it's having productvideos. Maybe you know having a what we call like a bacon wrapped marketingvideo at the very top of the final for your product, and what that means issomething that's going to be really flashy and something that's going tograb your attention, something that's going to be a little bit more of youknow, and I'm not the first to use this phrase but entertainment where you'reeducating somebody, but it's an entertaining way where it's not justwere the best. You know here's the best product for whatever. If you tell astory, but you wrap in the painpoints in the challenges, something that'sgoing to draw in your viewer to say I'm kind of interested in this and then asthey go down the funnel or you know down that buying cycle, then you get alittle bit more transactional. So maybe we have a longer video that gets intothe features and the functions, and then maybe you have some microcontentoff that that says: Hey here's, a twenty second snippet of you know thisfeature, on wit from CNCM ship. We're going to talk about. You know how easyit is to set up. then. The next one is is a quick video on R K, study story with a little STIPP UT.Where we talk about you know the return on the investment or for the customer.Hey within you know, eight months were able to turn a profit on this. This isgreat. You know having that content laid out across the buying journey inthe cycle, so that your sales people can quickly, you know, kind of sendthose out to them or, if you're, more sophisticated, using marketingaunomation or what have you to be able to kind of get those messages out there.It's kind of mapping out that content,...

...according to your buyers journey, isreally critical. So one of the tools that we love using that really help thesales people love it as well is creating, is having like a library ofcontent to be able to send your prospects, but delivering it. Usingsystems like vidyards go video or DUB DB. VID were big fans and dub, and whatthat is is actually you know. We are now so predisposed to video a lot more,especially. You know, because of zoom calls and all these zoom meetings andcameras are open, and I can't say how many companies I've talked to thatowners that are seventy five. Eighty years old and they're, like I neverthought, I'd be on a on a darn, zoom call but wow. This is amazing. This ispretty cool. Like you know, this is awesome that if you can get that tool into asalesperson where they can create a one to one video message using their Webcamand just being like Hey Joe I'm Danny here, Jist want to introduce myself.You know we met at Xyz show a year ago, and I wanted to you know, touch base with you. I don'tknow you know it same thing if be doing on the phone, but doing it over video.You know it creates a little bit more of a woneder one connection. It'sdifferent. It's differentiated a you know how many people, how many emails?Do you get where there's a little video that POPs up in the email and someone'swaving at you and you're able to deliver a message? The other great tool,the other great thing with that is you're able to go to send that contentlibrary of stuff that you have hey joe. We just had this great call and youwere talking about you're a little concerned about the Roy and how long itwould take to get three capture your investment. After plying our machine. Iwanted to send you this quick little video snippit from one of our customersXYZ company over here. Here's you know quick little story Om so sending thatout there. So it's making it easy for the sales people having content, that'sgoing to help them in the in the the buying journ and s and and reallyultimately help your customer so that you know when you see that that's thatshows innovation, a that's interesting and- and you know, if you're getting amillion emails and all the stuff it's going to fla to the top, because it'sjust different people are going to be...

...really curious about that. So thatwould be you know. I guess that would be my second thing, so I guess I throw a lot in there. So I'sreally more than two things, but if I were to boil it down as having content,that's mapped out to your sales, really byer birus journey having high levelcontent at the top that really engages and entertains, and the third piece ishaving something you know. A good dilet, delivery mechanism and kind of you knownapping all that together, I throw a lot at throw a lot in there, but nothat's that's all gold. I mean such such great thoughts there and Icompletely agree with you that the tool to your third point using video insideyour sales process, you know I'm a marketing guy, not a manufacturing guy.I work with with manufacturers, but I have embraced this over the last yearfor myself and it has just completely changed my my prospecting process likebeing able to reach out to somebody the tool I use is loom: loomcom, okay, yeah,my part, probably pretty similar to to DUB. I think you mentioned but yeah,but it's you know it allows you to put a little little chrome extension inyour browser. You Click a button and then you can put you know the camera onyourself. You can put you can record, what's on your screen, so doing asimple thing, like you know, putting their website up right there on thescreen, your your face over it. They most of these. These software programslat you just sort of copy and paste a link in it chowse a little animatedgraphic, and I think what you said is so true: it breaks all the clatter.Ninety nine point: nine percent of the emails you're getting especially frorpeople- you don't know- are their text based they're long they're, all aboutthem their lists of capabilities. Nobody wants this right and and whenyou can differentiate yourself and humanize yourself put a face and avoice behind everything and just break the clutter, and the data isemerging to from what I've seen you know. It's seen things like five times:the Click through rates and oh yeah in video emails include video. So I lovethat and I think it's I think, the...

...sales force of people's teams. Itshould be one of the first to be embracing the stuff, because that typeof video is so accessible right. It's just anybody can do that. It's you kindof need a little bit more firepower to produce some. You know some of h, somemore premium content and but there's there's a spectrum of all this stuffand it's a good way to Ti, think baby step into just sort of embracing videoand and you K, ow getting through the technology hurdles right exactly yeahand that's a great opportunity right now, because people, you know the oneof the Nice things tot come out of the covid you you know thing is that people aremore open to technology and it's you know that Hur, because you've beenforced. Really, I mean really that's what's happened, but now it's like okay,Waiwait, a minute, actually yeah, that was kind of painful, but this wasactually really cool. What else is out there so think it's a good opportunity.Ta People are more adapt to trying something new otally. So you mentionedgranger earlier. As one example of you know a series of videos they did. Arethere any other specific manufacturing organizations, whether big or small,that whether they're companies you've workedwith or just you others that you've observed that are doing some thingsreally well with video. I want to want to give listers, you know a fewcompanies. They can go. Look at after this and say all right lets. Let's seewhat they're doing so. SURSA'll share a interesting story with this was whaththe client of ours. They are a logistics company, actually a verysmall logestics company and one of the challenges that they hadwas essentially getting their message intopricing models all around transparency and it was sort of a cost plus offamiliar with logistics. And you know freight, you know, typically, the rateskind of go up and down and you're going to kind of you know pay whatever it is,and you could be paying a ten percent. They charge you a ten percent margin orforty or fifty or whatever. So what they want o to do is do something thatwas more transparent, say, look we're just looking for a fifteen percentmarkup and and that's it you know,...

...that's that's our thing and we'llrefund you N, whatever they were having a really hard time trying to sell thatin because for lack of better words, a lot of theshippers felt like they were. You know they're, somehow gettingscrewed over. You know, there's a lot of issues and stuff going, so theywould talk to them and talk to them and talk to them an no. No, no I'm nottrying to screw you like. You know it's really true and it well and they justweren't getting it, and so they tried doing. You know several differentvideos Om. You know, like those White Board animations, you know where thecartoons kind of drawing out it just wasn't hitting it. So they came likelook. We just cut as a last SDITCH. You knowW we're, throwing the thrown the ball, that you know half court. You know thebuzzers go and we're just going to try US one last thing you know so to make areally long story short. We kind of attack attacked it by going into thestorytelling piece and we said: Hey, look, let's look at your audience. Howare you guys using this? You know you guys are going to use. T is in an inperson setting they're going in they're, doing pitching or talking to people f.This would work whether it's over zoom. You know video or you're. Actually inperson with somebody we said. Listen, let's kick off that meet with a youknow, two minute, video or less. That really is going to sell the valueproposition, but we have to do it differently. We have to do somethingbecause you know, let's analyze how these customers are buying they're,literally lining up meeting after meeting after Manin, you guys are acommodity. There isn't like one of you and that's it. There's thousands of youand you're all the same for the most part right so and Youd line up allthese different meetings, and so we have to what we need to do is we needto be able to do something: that's Measurale that sticks in their mind.That creates a an emotional response, because, typically, when you do thatyou're able to attach a memory or something to that so knowing ouraudience and what we did, we create this way outside the box. Video likeway outside the box, the furthest thing away from your traditional corporatemeeting. We call it the make the naked man so basically their stories abouttransparency. So we literally delivered...

...our message with the story of a guybusting into a sales meeting wearing a transparent suit. Literally, I meandown to his underwear transparents Tu to talk about transparency, so you knowwhen I was talking about Bacon wrapping a little bit fore this is you knowsomething that it's like the reason why we call t bacon wrapping and it's kindof a- I don't know whatever you say: How do you give a dog a pill? Youwrapit in Bacon, so if you need to Bo out the living or message, you need tomake it a little bit more enticing that you know that etertainment thing,that's exactly what we did there so put this guy in the suit and whatever anddelivers the value prop, and it's just different and the success was huge.They had. They essentially had twenty meetings set up two weeks after theyhad this thing. They used this inside their sales process and they had ahundred percent close rate, and it was five million dollars, ind shippinglines and the reason why it was because it helped me out to cut through thenoise and be able to help to transmit their message and get it across betterand the and some of the feedback from some of these shippers were coming backto like yeah. I thought that thing was hilarious. I shared it with my wife,you know, and I sent it- you know like I totally, but you never believe theseguys came in they dist in this guys in transparent suit. Like dancei around onthe screen, I was like what the heck is this I laughed some people didn't likeit, they're like well, this is kind of whatever they remembered it though theyremembered it, and so it just it just cut through the noise, a D, and that, Ithink, is really what you know. That's one great way. Youknow wwe're talking to a lot of there's a lot of companies. Looking right nowsaying: Hey we're trying to start video. What should we do and when you look atsort of I'll call them? Maybe the plane, Vanilla, type videos which you do needto have all right? You need to have a mixture of stuff, but when you look atsome Bosnic, there are more storytelling that r there's morecreative, it's more than just a guy in front of a camera. Talking head, youknow telling you about all this stuff and we really engage in the story,really engage you in the painpoints. We are really able to you, know you'reable to as AF yewer to be identify, as you know who we're talking t say well,this is really for me. That's what's workd tit's great, I love it well is.Are there any resources, Dany, that you...

...could point listeners to whether on your sihter or elsewhere,for people who are thinking here? Okay, we got to figurethis out, we goit to start. You know, thinking about how to get video going.Where would you send them? So I would first thing what I would do is I'drecommend good industrial sagecom. We have just a few videos. No, I think wehave over probably two hundred eight or three hundred videos in resources therewith interviews talking to different companies about you know what they'redoing, how they're starting and we have a resources to ave in there, and thathas all kinds of you know webinars and other types of material. So how to usevideo in the sales process is a great webinar that I would highly recommendanother one we did recently was no more train shows what next it talking about.You know. COVID and how to respond and different tactics and strategies aroundthere and you know forhap, I can send you a short list of several differentinterviews that come to mind. You know we had the chief marketing officer fromABB. Her name was Moniq Elliot Isai actally. She just recently moved toSchnyder Shider Electric, but she talked about basically their journey onhow when they, when they started going from digital, like what did that looklike and you know what were they starting first and then how did theyevolve? You know another one is Maleka waller from landisand gear talks abouttheir digital journey as well and how they started, and it's all startingsmall. You know building you know looking for cases, communicating that,and you know she has a great phrase saying you know nail it and then scaleit so trying measuring communicating mail it and then scale it and go fromthere. So those are a couple resources right, NM, I'Ot, right now put links tothose in the show notes for this episode for sure. So absolutely go. Go!Look at those if you're listening right now. I think it's great to have somereally tangible things to give you context and help you sort of picture.How could we make this happen for us? So love that exactly well Danny? Thishas been a super helpful conversation. I've learned it ton just blistening,myself and I'mnd. I'm sure that...

...listeners hove as well as just such an important topic, and Ithink, there's nobody better than you to talk about it with your overlappingexperience and video and manufacturing sector. So thank you for joining us andcan you can you tell people? You know how to get in touch with you if theyhave questions or you ar interested in industrial sage? Sure absolutely so. Itsay the best way to get in touch with me is. You can check me out on lengthen so Dannagain Zalis check out my Lington profile, and you knowindustrial stage in go to Nustrol sagecom and it coundtact me therethere's an email address, there's some somewhere on site, but I wouldrecommend link tin. First Awesome Will Dani's been a pleasure having you onthe show, thanks for joining us. Thank you so much and for the rest of you. Wehope to catch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sale strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools specificallyfor B, to B manufacturers at grilla. Seventy sixcom warn thank you so muchfor listening until next time.

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