The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 1 year ago

How to Create Video Marketing that Drives Results in the Industrial Sector w/ Danny Gonzales

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

By 2022 online videos will make up more than 82% of consumer internet traffic. That's 15 times more than in 2017, according to a recent study by Cisco.  

Video is how your buyers want to consume information, so it's exactly how you need to deliver it to them. 

On this episode of The Manufacturing Executive Show, Danny Gonzales, CEO of both Industrial Sage and Optimum Productions, talked about driving growth through video production in the industrial sector. 

Here's what we discussed with Danny:  

  • How some industrial companies are using video to their advantage already 
  • Shifting your message from traditional marketing to the way buyers buy now 
  • How salespeople can make one-to-one messaging videos using their webcams and distribute them via video cards 
  • The way to get started in video marketing right now (and now's the perfect time!)  

Resources Mentioned in the Episode: 

Industrialsage.com 

Monique Elliot of Schneider Electric 

Malika Waller of Landis+Gyr 

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Show, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

What better way to do it thento, you know, put a camera on other people like them who areexperiencing these same issues and that let them tell their story. Welcome to themanufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving midsizemanufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compellingstories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B tob salesand marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast. I'mJoe Sullivan, your host and a cofounder of the Industrial Marketing Agency guerrilla seventysix. There are a lot of reasons why I'm super excited about our episodetoday, which is an interview with an expert and video production, and specificallyinside of the industrial sector. But let me throw a pretty staggering statistic outthere before I introduce him. A recent study by Cisco shows that by twothousand and twenty two online videos will make up more than eighty two percent consumerinternet traffic, and that's fifteen times higher than it was in two thousand andseventeen, and there are a lot of stats like this out there that justreally point to content consumption shifting to video, and numbers like this just kind ofblow my mind. But you can see it happening all around you.You search for something in Google, you scroll through your linked in feed andyou see more and more video. So the reality is this. If thisis how your buyers want to consume information, then it's exactly how we need tobe delivering it to them. So let me take a moment to introduceDanny Gonzalez of industrial sage and optimum productions. As an Atlanta native, Danny discoveredhis passion for video production while volunteering as a missionary in Mexico after highschool. Later, his extensive career experience in the world of digital video creationand marketing with companies throughout Georgia, let him be found optimum productions, afull service video marketing company, in March...

...of two thousand and seven. Danny'spersonal mission in life is not only to spur creativity and drive results, butalso to be actively involved and to consistently present positive and meaningful messages for thebetterment of our local community. And the world at large. Danny has overfifteen years of experience and marketing strategy and video production, working nationally and internationally. Maintaining a detailed marketing strategy, meaningful business insights and creative vision gives Dannythe ability to routinely exercise his left and right brain equally on the daily basis. For his clients, his unique talents, approach and accomplishments are on matched,as he continually garners award winning results, including nine telly awards for client productions. He's driven by results are and, ultimately, solving clients challenges with innovativevideo solutions. Danny resides and coming Georgia with his wife, Julie,and they have been blessed with four beautiful children. Danny also enjoy spending timewith his family, playing golf, cooking on the Big Green Egg, flyinghis drone, watching movies and racking up hours in the air with his privatepilot's license. Danny, thanks for joining us. Hey, thank you forhaving me. Super excited to be here. Awesome. So it's always interesting tolearn a few little nuggets about people that you'd have never otherwise known.I got to ask you about your pilot's license. Yeah, so that's ajust a awesome hobby of mine that I was, you know, to oneof those what do they say? You know, those bucket list item things. So I got it a couple of years ago after putting it off andputting it off and putting it off because, you know, I was busy,and then, anyways, was said, you know what, I don't thinkin the last several years I've gotten any less busy, so I needto go ahead and do this. So yeah, I got a couple yearsago and I absolutely love it. It's a great way to kind of,you know, take your mind off things and and you know, if it'sis actually an interesting aside that I've kind of learned anecdotally after getting this license. There's actually a lot of manufacturers, a lot of founders and CEOS ofher pilots as well, which I did not yeah, I didn't know thatat time. Then it would just come...

...up all the time and conversation.You go to conference room, you like Hey, so what is it isin a beach king? Are Like, Oh, yeah, you know.Oh, well, it's really funny. And Oh, you know, youknow Bob over there, he's got a TVM, you know, eight hundredand fifty, like Oh wow, that's cool and you know, and itwas just the small little you know. I don't know, maybe it's becauseif like, you know, part engineering and and and part of the justjust the sense of freedom and their entrepreneurs and there's something there, I think. But yeah, I love it. Is Awesome. The well, anice way to, you know, start conversations with the right people. Ifthere's some you know, some overlap, though, it's pretty cool. Exactlyhow often do you get up in the air? Not Enough, so Iwould say. You know, lately it's been at maybe once a week,you know, maybe a couple times in turn the month. So yeah,I just I've nothing. I don't find anything fancy. It's a little littletwo seater diamond point, Diamond Twenty. It's like on a glider profile.So it's pretty big and lightweight. Doesn't go super fast, but it's alot of fun, awesome. Love it. Well, I stumbled across industrial sagea few years ago and I was immediately drawn to all the video contentthat you guys produce and you know, like like in the Intro, Iknow, sort of mentioning there's just more and more and more video content emergingall around us, everywhere we kind of are, especially online, and youknow, you kind of see two ends of a spectrum. On one endthere's all the homemade stuff that people are shooting on their iphones, which fora lot of purposes is great. It's video is accessible to the average personnow and it has its place recordings of zoom meetings this year and in particularever since covid hit. And then on the other end of the spectrum there'salways been this sort of super high budget brand story type of stuff, youknow, multiple professional videographers, lots of post production, and there's there hasn'tbeen a lot in between. I feel like a lot of times it's beensort of both ends as a spectrum, and I think what caught my attentionwith you guys is you're bringing that professional quality video production into a really,you know, sort of human, tangible,...

...authentic, you know, setting withconversations in the interviews that you do with with manufacturing experts, and Inoticed also, you know, not too long ago, like Modex, youguys interviewed something like a hundred fifty manufacturing people, and so I just loveyour approach. There and I'd love for you to first sort of kick thisoff by telling your listeners a little bit about industrial stage and how you cameto be, and then we'll sort of dive into video production. Yeah,so, so industrial stage essentially was what I dub as the great experiment andthe really here's the backstory on it. So the set that you're seeing,if you know, if you're looking at the video I bought a couple yearsago. You know, I guess to set the stage is often productions.As traditionally a you know, Video Marketing Agency that I've had since two thousandand seven, and you know, we kept running into challenges where companies wouldneed to, you know, do like a town hall or do some sortof you know, more staged type of content that would be internally for corporationor externally, and we you you'd go to, you know, a conferenceroom or you'd go rent a hotel room and it was just really hard tomake it look great without spending a ton of money. So what we didis said, hey, why don't we invest in something and then they cancome here, we build a platform they can go off of. But it'sone of those things that it's really hard to sell something you can't see.So we said, all right, well, let's show people how you need tobe shaping your content and why you need to be doing it on anongoing basis and why, specifically, we feel that video is a huge valuableasset it and there's multiple reasons for that, which we'll get into. So wesaid, okay, let's create our own show, and it was eithergoing to be basically local business stories and the Atlanta area or something that wasgonna be a little bit more focused. And we have a had a lotof clients in the industrially manufacturing space and we said, you know what,let's focus on that, let's go there, and that's essention of what happened.In the goal was really it was a one as a weekly show whereinterview, you know, executives and different people in the sales and marketing spacein the manufacturing industrial areas, and then...

...just kind of grow from there.And then, you know, within the last year or so, maybe beforethat, started making a little bit more of a pivot. As you know, companies started coming US and saying, Hey, how can you guys helpus and how can you you know, how can we get on your platform. We'd love to come in and we'd like to do a series, butmaybe not on sales and marketing, but on you know, ARP or doingsomething on you know, lean, lean six sigma or what have you.So we are have since started making a pretty big pivot and are the thegoal of industrial stage now is really to be an open platform for basically youknow companies able to come in and be able to contribute content. It's forthe it's for the the professionals. Think of a Cheddar or buzzfeed kind oftype play. We're kind of creating that for the industrial space. So that'swhere you know, I know you guys have you've got some articles you've puton industrial stage. It's great. We've got video country of other companies thatare coming in and they're starting to kick off their own series that'll live underneaththe industrial stage banner and that's really the goal. I think that the unfortunately, I think the manufacturing industrial space typically kind of is like the redheaded stepchild when you look at agencies typically, and marketing agencies, Pr Whatnot,because they think it's not cool and they think it's Oh, it's just dirtyand grimy and you know, and there's real sentiment to that because the otherwisethere wouldn't be workforce development issues that they have where they're trying to attract newlabor and and new talent into this space, because there is an image, thereis an image factor. So we believe. I have been in Ican't tell you how many Oren warehouses and manufacturing facilities and plants and I thinkthat the what is going on is amazing and I just think their story hasnot been told well and when you start telling it and a better way andyou put a good light on it, it totally change the changes to perspectiveand it totally flips the script. And so that's that's really essentially sort ofour our goal is to really just evangelizing say what is happening out here isamazing, it's awesome, I love it. Yeah, you know, I thinkin a lot of ways, you know, as somebody's been running inagency that is focused on manufacturing for more...

...than ten years now, you seein general bebe manufacturers kind of lagging behind on marketing technology and you know,that's that's kind of across the board. It's with their websites, it's with, you know, the idea of content production that's educational and nature rather thanbrochure type of content. I think from what I've seen, the same appliesand video. And so what's interesting is right now now, you're sort ofat this point where anybody who can embrace the video right now is really goingto separate themselves from from others who are out there. So I'd be curiousto hear you know what your observations are around how you see video starting toenter the industrial sector more. What are companies doing? How are they usingit to their advantage? Absolutely, yeah, it's a huge topic of interest rightnow. I mean, and it was before, but obviously, youknow, because of the whole covid situation everything, it's been gas lit alot more. Obviously it's so what we're seeing is this. There's things kindof across the spectrum and it depends on where, you know, these organizationsare and you know you've got a lot of companies that haven't really done awhole lot of video and maybe what they've done is an identity video, youknow, some corporate identity piece or branding piece. This is us and we'vebeen around since one thousand nine hundred and fifty three and the Idiada Yada,you know, with the big authoritative voice and that you know it's very corporateimage to product, videos to and by product, that it's very feature functionkind of driven. So it's a little bit more like how it works versus, you know, the results that it, you know, achieves kind of thing. So you know, in the basic form of that, all theway to some of the bigger players are coming in and they're really gut jumpjumping into thought leadership type content, storytelling and and really, you know,if you really look at where BTC companies traditionally market, you know the thebigger manufacturers and industrial companies are leaning towards that's the direction that we're going andthere's typically there's a little bit of a misnomer that a lot of people think, well, you know, we're be to be, we sell, youknow, we're it's not like consumer so we don't need to have all thebig, flashy stuff. Well, the...

...reality of it is is a lotof these copies are starting to realize that you know, you're you're actually sellingto another human. Yes, it maybe a be to be product with alot of Zeros at the end of it, but you know, there are stilla motion in the still interaction that happens there and that doesn't you knowthat that should not discount. Matter of fact, you know, you havea great opportunity to be able to stand out. So if you can.You were mentioning you know, a lot of people are doing zoom calls andiphone stuff, and I think there's a great place and there's a super strongpurpose for that, provided that it's attached to a strategy. But what happens? If you really want to stand out, you got to start thinking outside ofthe box, and this is why you're seeing a lot of storytelling.I think that you know, like Granger, for example, they did a greatseries. This is several years ago. They did this was everyday heroes,and what they would do is they were focusing on their customers, butthey weren't talking about their customers, you know, like it wasn't like atraditional customer testimonial like Oh, tell us how amazing we are. It wasall about you tell it, we want to know, like what you guysare doing, and they didn't even mention really bring any products or even sayhey, grangers, amazing with us. It was just focusing on the customerand just sharing their stories, and I think that's that, if I wereto boil down, you know, video content and even just marketing in generalfor manufacturers industrial where they really need to flip and really need it to think, is traditionally marketing has been. We're amazing, where the hundred foot poundgorilla. We've been around since one thousand nine hundred and twenty five and ourbrand stands for, you know, it's all about our brand, and thisstands for we're strong and you know we're consistent and we're innovative. And thereality of it is the way the buyers buy now that that's not how theybuy, and so you have to shift your message to you know what's init for me, you have to go out and to solve your customers challenge, to bring value to them, and so you kind of have to comeat it from a from a different angle, and I think right now is avery pivotal moment where a lot of manufacturers, you know you're going tosee the ones who are really going to...

...succeed, where they flip that andthey start saying, okay, we need to we need to, we needto do this first, the other. Once they no forget it. We'rejust we're going to be stick to that. So that's kind of what we're seeing. You know, across the board there's you know, but there's alot of things sort of sort of in between. They answer your question.Oh yeah, I mean there's so much good stuff that packed into what youjust said. I mean, the thing I always say is nobody cares whoyou are, nobody cares what you do, until they believe that, you know, you can identify with the issues they're experiencing, in the things aretrying to achieve and the questions are trying to get answered. And I mean, what better way to do it then to, you know, put acamera on other people like them who are experiencing these same issues and let themtell their story, you know, make it tangible, make it very humanand relatable. And what happens then is, you know, it's it almost seemsa little counterintuitive if this is not your your way of thinking about themessage you've broadcast your audience. But when actually happens is that's what's going toengage people and and then they're going to start looking at you. You know, if you're the one who's sort of providing really helpful information and examples ofothers like them and how there's there something their problems will you're the facilitator ofall this helpful information now and you're gonna be the natural, you know,first person they call and they're trying to decide, you know, how arewe going to solve our problem and who can help us with that? SoI love everything you just said. They're awesome. Yeah, no, Imean it's it's that's the way it's going. So totally. So telling the story, you know, putting it, putting the spotlight on one of youknow, your customers and not having them talk about you. So that that'sone way to do it. Like, what else are you seeing? Youknow, how else are you seeing video being used effectively by manufacturing organizations?Try to make this tangible for you, for listeners, as much as youcan. Absolutely. So I can tell you one thing right now that Imean there's a lot of different ways. I maybe all focus on to one. The first one is making sure, you know, the companies are havingmore their content is more wrap around their sales enablement piece. So typically,what we'll start off with, you know,...

...the classic clash between marketing and sales, typically in the manufacturing space, marketing makes the SPEC sheets and youknow does the trade show booth and that's about it. And then you havethis fight between sales and marketing saying, you know, sales saying, Hey, I need this and why the heck did you produce that? That doesn'tmake any sense. There's no connection, there's no synergy, there's no strategy. So what we're seeing is, you know, if you start getting intothe mind for as a market, are you getting into the mind of yoursales team saying what do you guys need? You know, what content can weprovide about to help facilitate your help still take in the sales process,is a huge win. And so, specifically, maybe it's having product videos, maybe, you know, having a what we call like a bacon wrappedmarketing video at the very top of the funnel for your product. And whatthat means is something that's going to be really flashy and something that's going tograb your attention, something that's going to be a little bit more of youknow, and I'm not the first to use this phrase, but entertainment,where you're educating somebody, but it's an entertaining way, where it's not justwhere the best. You know, here's the best product for whatever it's.You tell a story, but you wrap in the pain points, in thechallenges, something that's going to draw in your viewer to say I'm kind ofinterested in this. And then as they go down the funnel or you know, down that buying cycle, then you get a little bit more transactional.So maybe we have a longer video that gets into the features and the functionsand then maybe you have some micro content off that that says, Hey,here's a twenty twond a snippet of, you know, this feature on wefrom CNC machine. We're going to talk about, you know, how easyit is to set up. And the next one is is is a quickvideo on or case study story with a little stipp at where we talked about, you know, the return on the investment for the customer. Hey,within you know, eight months, we're able to turn a profit on thisand this is great. You know, having that content laid out across thebuying journey and the cycle so that your salespeople can quickly, you know,kind of send those out to them or, if you're more sophisticated, using marketingautomation or what have you, to be able to kind of get thosemessages out there. It's kind of mapping...

...out that content according to your buyersjourney is really critical. So one of the tools that we love using thatreally help the sales people love it as well, is creating, is havinglike a library of content to be able to send your prospects, but deliveringit using systems like videyards, go video or dub dub video or big fansof Dub. And what that is is actually, you know, we arenow so predisposed to video a lot more, especially, you know, because ofzoom calls and all these zoom meetings and cameras are open. I can'tsay how many companies have talked to that owners that are seventy, five,eighty years old and they're like, I never thought I'd be on a dartand zoom call, but wow, this is amazing, this is pretty cool. Like, you know, this is awesome that if you can get thattool into a salesperson where they can create a one to one video message usingtheir Webcam and just being like hey, Joe, I'm Danny Hares. Wantto introduce myself. You know, we met at X Y Z show ayear ago and I wanted to, you know, touch base with you.I don't know, you know, it's same thing you'd be doing on thephone, but doing it over video. You know, it creates a littlebit more of a one to one connection. It's different, it's differentiated. Youknow, how many people, how many emails do you get where there'sa little video that pops up in the email and someone's waving at you andyou're able to deliver a message? The other great tool, the other greatthing with that is you're able to be able to send that content, librarystuff that you have. Hey, Joe, we just had this great call andyou were talking about you're a little concern about the Roy and how longit would take to get the recapture your investment after buying our machine. Iwanted to send you this quick little video snippet from one of our customers,XYZ company, over here. Here's, you know, quick little story.Boom. So sending that out there. So it's making it easy for thesalespeople having content that's going to help them in the in the the buying journey, say, and it really ultimately help your customer, so that you knowwhen you see that, that's that shows innovation, as that's interesting and andyou know, if you're getting a million emails and all the stuff, it'sgoing to float to the top because it's...

...just different. People are going tobe really curious about that. So that would be, you know, Iguess that would be my second thing. So I guess I threw a lotin there. So it's really more than two things, but if I wereto boil it down as having content that's mapped out to your sales really buyor buyers journey, having high level content at the top that really engages inentertains, and the third piece is having something, you know, a gooddelect delivery mechanism and kind of, you know, mapping all that together.I threw a lot at throw a lot in there, but that's that's allgold. I mean such such great thoughts there and I completely agree with youthat the tool to your third point, using video inside your sales process.You know, I'm a marketing guy, not a manufacturing guy. I workwith with manufacturers, but I have embraced this over the last year for myselfand it is just completely changed my my prospecting process, like being able toreach out to somebody. The tool I use is loom loomcom. Yeah,my heart probably pretty similar to dub I think you mentioned. But yeah,but it's you know, it allows you to put a little little chrome extensionin your browser. You Click a button and then you can put, youknow, the camera on yourself. You could put you can record what's onyour screen. So doing a simple thing like, you know, putting theirwebsite up right there on the screen, exactly your your face over it.They most of these these software programs that you just sort of copy and pastea link in. It shows a little animated graphic and I think what yousaid is so true. It breaks all the clutter. Ninety nine point ninepercent of the emails you're getting, especially from people that you don't know,are their text base, they're long, they're all about them, their listsof capabilities. Nobody wants this, right and and when you can differentiate yourselfand humanize yourself, put a face and a voice behind everything and just tobreak the clutter. And the data is emerging to from what I've seen,you know, it's I've seen things like five times the the click through rates. And, Oh yeah, and video emails include video. So I lovethat and I think it's I think the...

...sales force of people's teams that shouldbe one of the first to be embracing this stuff, because that type ofvideo is so accessible. Right. It's just anybody can do that. It'syou kind of need a little bit more firepower to produce some, you know, some of the some more premium content. And but there's IT. It's there'sa speck drum of all this stuff and it's a good way to thinkbaby step into just sort of embracing video and and getting through the technology hurdles. Right, exactly. Yeah, and it's a great opportunity right now becausepeople, you know, the one of the Nice things to come out ofthe covid the you know thing is that people are more open to technology andit's you know, that her because you've been forced really, I mean really, that's what's happened. But now it's like, okay, wait a minute, that actually yeah, that was kind of painful, but this is actuallyreally cool. What else is out there? So I think it's a good opportunityto people are more adapted to trying something new totally. So you mentionedgranger earlier. Is One example of, you know, a series of videosthey did. Is there any other specific manufacturing organizations, whether big or small, that whether their companies you've worked with or just you others that you've observedthat are doing some things really well with video. I want to want togive listeners, you know, a few companies they can go look at afterthis and say, all right, let's see what they're doing. So sureI saw share a interesting story with this was what the client of ours.They are logistics company, Actually Very Small Logistics Company, and one of thechallenges that they had was essentially getting their mess at a new pricing models allaround transparency, and it was sort of a costplus of familiar with logistics andyou know freight. You know typically the rates kind of go up and downand you're going to kind of, you know, pay whatever it is andyou could be paying a ten percent charge, you a two percent margin or fortyor fifty or whatever. So what they wanted to do is do somethingthat was more transparency. Look, we're just looking for a fifteen percent markupand and that's at you know that,...

...that's that's our thing and we'll refundyou and whatever. They were having a really hard time trying to sell thatin because for a lack of better words, a lot of the shippers felt likethey were, you know, they're somehow getting screwed over. You know, there's a lot of issues and stuff going so they would talk to themand talk to them and talk to them and no, no, I'm nottrying to screw you like you know, it's really deep and it well andthey just weren't getting it. And so they've tried doing, you know,several different videos from, you know, like those Whiteboard animations, you know, where the cartoons kind of drawing out. Just wasn't hitting it. So theycame there like look, we just cut this a last ditch, youknow, we're throwing the throw on the ball to, you know, halfcourt. You know the buzzers go and we're just going to try this onelast thing, you know. So, to make a really long story short, we kind of a tap attacked it by going into the storytelling piece andwe said Hey, look, let's look at your audience. How are youguys using this? You know, you guys are going to use this inan in person setting. They're going in, they're doing pitching or talking to people, and this would work, whether it's over zoom, you know,video or you're actually in person with somebody. We said, listen, let's kickoff that meeting with a, you know, two minute video or less. That really is going to sell the value proposition. But we have todo it differently. We have to do something because, you know, let'sanalyze how these customers are buying. They're literally lining up meeting after meeting aftermeeting. You guys are commodity. There isn't like one of you and that'sit. There's thousands of you and you're all the same for the most part, right. So, and and you line up all these different meetings.And so we have to well, we need to do is we need tobe able to do something that's measure that sticks in their mind, that createsa an emotional response at because typically when you do that, you're able toattach a memory or something to that. So, knowing our audience and whatwe did, we create this way outside the box video, like way outsidethe box, the furthest thing away from your traditional corporate meaning. We wecall it the make the naked man. So basically, their stories about transparency. So we literally delivered our message with...

...the story of a guy busting intoa sales meeting wearing a transparent suit, literally, I mean down to hisunderwear, transparent suit to talk about transparency. So you know, when I wastalking about Bacon wrapping, little bit for this is, you know,something that it's like the reason why we call it bacon rapping and it's kindof a I don't know, whatever you say. How do you give adog a pill? You wrap it and Bacon. So if you need togo deliver your message, you need to make it a little bit more enticingthat. You know that edgetatement thing. That's exactly what we did there.So put this guy in the suit and whatever and delivers the value prop andit's just different. And the success was huge. They had they essentially hadtwenty meetings set up two weeks after they had this thing. They use thisinside their sales process and they had a hundred percent close rate and it wasfive million dollars and shipping lines. And the reason why was because it helpedme able to cut through the noise and be able to help to transmit theirmessage and get it across better. And the and some of the feedback fromsome of these shippers are coming back like yeah, I thought that thing washilarious. I shared it with my wife, you know, and I sent ityou know, like I told us. But you never believe these guys camein. They just in, these guys and transparents do like dance aroundon the screen. I was like, what the heck is this? Ilaughed. Some people didn't like it. They're like, well, this iskind of whatever. They remembered it, though. They remembered it, andso it just it just cut through the noise and and that, I think, is really what you know, that's one great way. You know,we're talking to a lot of there's a lot of companies looking right now saying, hey, we're trying to start video. What should we do? And whenyou look at sort of I'll call the maybe the plane vanilla type videos, what you do need to have? All right, you need to havea mixture of the stuff. But when when you look at some of thesethings that are more storytelling, that are there's more creative, it's more thanjust a guy in front of a camera talking head, you know, tellingyou about all this stuff, and we really engage you in the story,really engage you in the pain points. We are really able to you know, you're able to as a viewer, to be identify, as you know, who we're talking to. Wow, this is really for me. That'swhat's working. It's great and I love it. Well is are there anyresources, Danny, that you could point listeners to, whether on your sightor elsewhere, for people who are thinking...

...here, okay, we got tofigure this out, we got to start, you know, thinking about how toget video going. Where would you send them? So I would firstthing. What I would do is I'd recommend good industrial stagecom. We havejust a few videos now. Way I think we have over probably two hundredat our three hundred videos and resources there with interviews talking to different companies about, you know, what they're doing, how they're starting, and we havea resources tab in there and that has all kinds of, you know,webinars and other types of materials. So how to use video on the salesprocess is a great webinar that I would highly recommend. Another one we didrecently was no more trade shows. What next? It talking about, youknow, covid and how to respond to different tactics and strategies around there.And you know, for half I can send you a short list of severaldifferent interviews that come to mind. You know, we had the chief marketingofficer from ATB. Her name is Monique Elliott, I think actually she justrecently moved to Schneider Schneider Electric, but she talked about basically their journey onhow when they when they started going from digital, like what did that looklike and, you know, what were they starting first, and then howdid they evolve? You know, another one is Malika waller from Landis andgear. Talks about their digital journey as well and how they started. Andit's all starting small, you know, building, you know, looking forcases, communicating that and you know, she has a great phrase saying,you know, nail it and then scale it. So trying measuring, communicating, nail it and then scale it and go from there. So those area couple resources right now. I'm right now put links to those in thethe show notes for this episode, for sure. So absolutely go go lookat those if you're listening right now. I think it's great to have somereally tangible things to give you context and help you sort of picture how couldwe make this happen for us. So love that exactly. Well, Danny, this has been a super helpful conversation. I've learned it ton just listening myself, and I'm sure that listeners have...

...as well. You know, it'sjust such an important topic. I think there's nobody better than you to talkabout it with your overlapping experience and video and the manufacturing sector. So thankyou for joining us. And can you can you tell people you know howto get in touch with you if they have questions or are interested in industrialstage? Sure, absolutely so. I said the best way to get intouched me is you can check me out on Linkedin. So, Danny Gonzalez, check Dow my linkedin profile and you know industrial stage. You can goto industrial stagecom and think contact me there. There's an email address. There's somesomewhere on site, but I would recommend linkedin first. Awesome. Well, Danny's been a pleasure having you on the show. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much, and for the rest of you, we hopeto catch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listeningto the manufacturing executive podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode,subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sales strategy. You'll find an ever expanding collection ofarticles, videos, guides and tools specifically for BTB manufacturers at Gorilla Seventy sixcomlearn thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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