The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 6 months ago

Creating a Well-Designed Sales Playbook w/ Kevin Roach

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

If you have a defined sales process, you're ahead of 50% of the manufacturing companies out there. But without one, you can't measure efficacy or deliver maximum value to your customers. Your organization will suffer.

Why is it so hard for manufacturers to draft a sales playbook? And what's the right solution to this problem?

In today's episode, I discuss creating a sales playbook for manufacturers with Kevin Roach, President at Harpak-ULMA Packaging. He's the first Gorilla 76 client I've ever hosted on the show, and I loved it!

Here's what Kevin and I talked about:

  1. Ways to align your sales process with the buyers' journey
  2. Why OEE and TCO need to be part of the sales conversation
  3. How to overhaul the way you go to market with your sales team

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Manufacturing Executive in your favorite podcast player.

Without a documented sales process thatall are trained on, you can't measure efficacy. You won't deliver maximumvalue to customers. Your sales, people, Wi Lok Beig, less effective and yourorganization will be less effective. Welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here. You'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles and you'ill learn from DTB sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get into the show, welcome to another episode of theManufacturing Executive Podcast, I'm Joe Sullivan your host and a cofounderof the Industrial Marketing Agency Gerillu, seventy six. So it's reallyeasy, sometimes in the business development process, to focus onourselves, especially when we know exactly how good our product is or howamazing our customer services and how skilled are engineers or technicalprofessionals are, and while all of that will work to our advantage once anew customer relationship has begun, it can actually work against us inmarketing and sales and that's because our buyers are focused on their issuesand their problems and their goals, not our products and all the bells andwhistles that come with them. Your prospects are wherever they are intheir own buyers journeys and it's our job to meet them there to listen to betheir guide. My guest today is a leader in themanufacturing space that gets this more than most, who have talked to and he'sput these concepts into practice inside the manufacturing organization that heleads, focusing on things like total cost of ownership or TCO, and overallequipment, effectiveness or oee to drive sales conversations that arecustomer centric instead of focusing on his own products, features and benefits.So on that note, let me take a moment to introduce Kevin Roach. Kevin Roachis the president and CEO of the automated packaging equipmentmanufacturer Harpack Olma Kevin is a senior level of technology executivewith proven global leadership and distinguished performance andoperations and sales, as well as financial and general management he'salso experienced in strategic planning, research and development, manufacturingand marketing across multiple industries. Earlier in his career,Kevin led honeywell intellegrated, a software division of Honeywell focusedon warehouse execution software during his tenure he reinvented the company'sapproach to sales, market development, product development, quality,professional services and investment strategies, Kevin successfully,positioned intellegrated as a global leader and integrated systems andsoftware solutions for the supply chain...

...and also led the company's breakthrough initiative for the Connected Distribution Center. Kevin has alsoserved as executive vice president and general manager of epicorse SoftwareExecutive Vice President and general manager of actevant solutions,president and CEO of Rockwell software, and vice president of GE, industrialsoftware, a proponent of lean and six Sigma and Certified Ge. Six IGMA blackbelt Kevin is passionate about building company cultures focused on continuousimprovement. Kevin Welcome to the show hey joe great to be here thanks forhaving me, you bet well Kevin, quite the professional journ you've had up tothis point. Is there anything from the Bio? I just read that you'd like toelaborate on in terms of what led you to where you are today at heartback,Oma yeah, it's interesting Joe. I beginn my career actually as anengineer at a company that was the precorriston Oak, Bak ommon companycalled t cutter, founded by the same family, that founded Aragoma and likeParbakoma tw cutter was a company that provided lotofmae packaging lines,lines that were intended to produce size, beed packaging or the food,medical and industrial markets from there. I did find a couple of my opencompanies, one that led me to Gne because they ultimately acquired it hada lot of funny rockwell automation, what a great company there as well and,as you mentioned a number of private equity gigs, where we were positioningcompanies for growth and, ultimately for sale. So I guess you could say I'vecome kind of full circle, some thirty five years later here back at home. Inhartback Almart for our next digital transformation and growth to help ourcustomers grow awesome, but that's that's all great stuff you're. Actually,I think the the last four episodes ive done, your the second that has been apart of Rockwell at some point, so it's that's a name that you know seems tocome up and just about every other conversation I have with a manufacturerfor good reason. So it's a great company and, of course, a partner ofours, because the machines we produce now are very rockwell centric. So weproduce machines with nearly a hundred percent, rockwel controls, componentsand software, along with our other partof PTC, who is a type partner withrockwall automation as well. You may have read a couple years ago: Rockwellinvested over a billion dollars into PTC, and, and now it's about a tenpercent stakholder and Rockwall cols on the Board of PTC Blake, Morett wellKevin. You are officially the first client of Gerilla. Seventy six thatI've interviewed on this show. So we've been working together for a bit now andI hand picked you because you guys run a really tight ship at Hartpack. Yourteam is exceptional, I'v Seen first hand how well structured anddisciplined both your marketing and sales teams are- and you- and I weretalking recently about how how many manufacturing organizations don'treally have a well defined sales playbook. Instead, you get youleadership. Teams tending to you know, tell their sales teams, here's theproduct now go get hem, and I was just wondering if you could talk a littlebit about why this is a problem when that seems to be the approach. It's agreat question and it still amazes me Joe that I'm going to guess that nearlyhalf the companies out there of various...

...sizes- it's not just the small ones,it's mediums and it's large companies, simply don't have a sales process, andthat means that it's going to effectively lessen the efficacy oftheir sales team. Their customers is going to impact customer satisfactionand, in the end, it's going to limit growth and success for the company. Ifyou rely on every single salesperson to make it up as they go you're going toget tens or hundreds of variations of what you're trying to retieve withcustomers which isn't going to feel good with customers- and it's not goingto be effective. If you don't have define process with metrics that youcan't measure, you can't improve those metrics, so we're continuous improvement. Orientedculture were always seeking improvement to beliver more value to our customers.We fallow very rigorous process methods to constantly improve things, so Iwould say, simply put without a documented sales process that all aretrained on. You can't measure efficacy, you won't deliver maximum value tocustomers, your sales, people, wil, be less effective and your organizationwill be less effective. So, in the end you must have a God must have goodprocess rigor to scale and grow a business. Let me give AU an example.Let's say that you were going to go, have Hart Surgery and you had Dr a andDr Bev that you could choose from Dr a has a very rigorous process, and hedoes it the same way. Every single time. It's been tested and refined andimproved and the outcomes are amazing. Dor B has a bit of a rusty scalpel onhis utility knife belt and says: Let's go. I think I can get this done prettywell, who you going to pick somebody that has a refined process with provenoutcomes or Somebong. That's going to wing it. I think it's starked to a inthis point in this case yeah. I think so, but that's a I pretty funny. Youbring up the that example actually, because I actually had open art surgeryat the edge of eight and so very relevant, and I'm hoping my my parentschose doctor a I assume they did o. So it seems like you're doing wellso IA. I think so. No, it's a great example though, and I think you'reexactly right and it's the same way. Manufacturing organizations need to bethinking, and you know some of them may not be so so to capin. I was wondering alongthose lines. I know that you that Harpeckalma has designed a salesprocess that aligns very intentionally with the buyers journey and wonderingif you could talk a little bit about the stages of that process, to providesome context yeah. I love to we've been working on this now for a little morethan two and a half years, and I would say, we're probably ninety percentthere, so wwe feel good about the progress. Let me stop by saying. Thefirst thing we did is to interview and understand our customersbuying journey. So how do they go about buying things rather than how do wewant to sell? We want understand how they buy so that we could match ourselling process to the buying process, so we've developed the very buyingcenpirecentric process for selling. As...

I mention, we interviewed a bunch ofour customers, we identify what stages they go through as their contemplatingpurchases of new capital equipment. I think that's incredibly important foreverybody to start the Stot with who you're working with and then we developthe stages. So let me talk about the stages. We have five stages and againwe'd see these as the Byas path that we need to follow and assist and help thembe successful and I'll use buying an automobile as an example to kind ofrelate to what our buyers are going through and the things that happenduring the different stages. The first stage is recognition. That's when yousay hm I may need in your piece of equipment. In this case the car my carhas been. You know getting a little Rattaly, the AC's getting weak. One ofthe windows is busted. Maybe I really got to let this this puppy go to thegraveyard and get a new car that recognition phase is when youdetermining do you have an a nee? Do you have a problem to solve? Do youhave an opportunity to pursue? Do you have an issue to avoid so recognitionis the first age once you exit the recognition stage, you enter the nextstage, which is okay. I recognize I need a new car. The next one isdetermining theds, so I've recognize I havin me now, let's determine whatthose needs are, and I should mention in these first two stages: our sellingteam isn't selling at all theire understanding, they're probing theireducating they're, not trying to sell anything. It's too early to be selling.This is about understanding and ultimately being able to guide ourcustomers to their best outcome, based on our expertise. So determining needsis where you say: okay, do I want a truck, or do I want a car? Do I need afour door or two doin? Do I care about a convertible? Do I need a minivan, sodetermining needs is where you start collecting the requirements ultimatelyfor the piece of equipment that you want to buy once you get through TDETermany need you enter evaluating watchons, and this is pretty natural tous as humans. Right do I meet something, Yeahi do okay. What do I want? Well, Ihave some choices. When I look at the choices I than evaluate those options.Well, how much does a tesslacaus versus something else, and can I really getthat cool electric vehicle or you know? What do I really need, and then Ievaluate the options once I take a look at all my options, I narrow them downto a couple of key choices. Maybe the two or three top up opportunities thatseem to meet my requirements and once I evaluate those I start resolvingconcerns resolving concerns, be in the fourth stage, I'm like alrigh. I've gota good choince and Cara and Carbe, which one do I really want why Iresolved some concerns. The warranty wasn't quite as good in this one. Asthat one work with the other guy. Can you extend the warranty then?Ultimately, the final stage is selection, so those ar the five sagentsrecognition determining needs, evaluating options, resolving concernsand then making a selection and something that's important that a lotof companies if they do have a sales process, don't do, and I highlyrecommend is for a prospect or an...

...opportunity to move through the pihtfrom recognition ultimately to selection. We require that the prospectexecutes an activity before we move them from stage to stage, so we don'tallow our sales people to say whoo. I just had a great meeting they're inthis LEX and stage we're going TA wear the deal. It's like wait, a minute. Youhaven't gone through all all all the toll gates to get there and so everysingle stage a customer needs to do something to be to be moved to the next tage. Andwhy is that important? Because if you let sales people do it, they will havemisalignment, because they didn't get confirmation from an activity from theprospect and you will have sale cycle elongation, which means your cycletimes are going to go up and your wind rates are going to go down your Costagoing to go up. So what's the matter with that, higher cost less wins andlonger time to do that. So it's really important that you have a prospectperformant activity before you move them from stage to stage that has beenvery effective for us. I think that's really smart and what a greatstructured process. How did you guys get here? How did it? How did it longdid it take to develop a process like this, and you know I'm just kind ofcurious what kind of pain you went through to arrive where you are todaywith something? That's so disciplined? Well, it's good question and I wish Icould say, and then did all this cool stuff myself, but I didn't we work forthe company back in around two thousand and eight, when I was activit in theepicor, the company called SBC sales benchmack index and there's a bunch ofsorry Spi. There's a bunch of companies like that that specialize in salesprocess consulting and we hired them, and we hired them for two years andthey worked with our leadership team. They helped us develop the metrics.They actually did ride alons with our sales people to talk to customers tounderstand the buying journey. So we were quite scientific about it andbecause we didn't have a great sales process, we thought it would be greatto bring in people that have done it over and over and over again. So that'swhere we learned it and developed it, and since then, I've taken thoselearnings to each company. I've been to and tweek them for the market, becauseevery sales process isn't the same. It really depends on the market, thebuyers journey, the equipment, Deta, beeversus, BDC, etc. Something thatreally stands out from everything you just said is how customer centric, youare in your sales approach and you take the time to t understand what thosepeople care about to interview them to collect insights from their mouths, andI just see this step being overlooked, so many assumptions being made in thesales process so much focus on. This is what we do, and this is what we selland I think that you've been really smart to start with the customer, whatthey care about, what they're telling you and what their buyers journey lookslike and build around that you know Joe everybody falls into the trap ofthinking. We know it all. You know, we've been doing our job for so long.We know exactly why we lost this deal...

...or exactly why we won that deal andit's amazing. How often we're wrong we're recently, working with anotherfirm, called double check that specializes in win loss, analysis andthey're, going through each of our product lines and the insights thatwere getting from customer interviews what they do by the way is they, theycall customers and go, spend it thirty to forty five minute sessioninterviewing them about. Why did you select Hartback OA, or why didn't youselect Harpalk Olma? How was their sales process? How was their team? Whatdo you think about their equipment? How about their ease of doing business ortheir reputation, and it's amazing, the things you learn? One of them- that'swas pretty interesting and should have been obvious, is how very important service and supportes to people. It was universally the number one thing that came out ofnearly every conversation and we kind of take it for grantid. We've got agreat sales, great sal teeme, but anincredible service team spread outthroughout the country team of about sixty people, and we just get used toknowing that they're good and forget how important it is and h the learningthere. The insight we have is we need to put that more up front when we're inthese selling stages to make sure that we're emphasizing how good we are atthat, how important is to them and how it keeps them up and running. So thatwas a good learning. There were many others, but you always think you knowit all, and you almost never do yeah you're right on the money there andI've seen your double check report, given that we, our companies, worktogether and it's exceptional, I would encourage companies to look at whatdouble checks doing, because the insights that come out of that areat the absolute exact things that should be fueling. Your marketing andsales strategy, yeah they're great company like yours, we've teen withthem quite intimately, where we kind of think of your company and their companyas part of our team. You know we're very transparent with everything, asyou know, so it really enhances our ability to do a good job by havingpeople like you and double check and others support us with specializedskills. I I appreciate that for everybody listening, I gave Kevin adiscount on next month's bill to say that so takones kidding Wel Kevin you and I have known eachother for a little over a year or so now and one of the things I've heardyou talk about numerous times or a a couple things. I've heard you talkabout our one oee or overall equipment effectiveness and to TCO O r total costof ownership. A good percentage of our audience here are machine builders orsome sort of equipment manufacturer and these con. These are concepts thatreally, in most cases, should be front and center in their sales conversationswith prospects. But I know that's not always the case. So I'm curious if youcould talk a little bit about by why both O ee and TCO really need to be apart of the sales conversation absolutely and and like a good salesprocess. I think this is an area that many manufactures excel at some areokay at it, some totally ignore it. So...

...it's again it's a mixed bag, but thereare excellent companies that focus on this and all the way to ones that don'teven know what oe stands for and, as you said, oh, he is an acronym foroverall equipment effectiveness. It has basically three parts: it hasavailability, which is the percentage of a scheduled time that the machinesable to operate. So it's basically uptime is the machine able to run thenext is performance. It's designed to run at four hundred packages a minute.Are you getting four hundred packages a minute out of the machine, or is it alittle bit slower than we promised as when we sold the machine and that I'llmake a big difference? So availability is uptime performance to speak? Thenext is quality is every single package in this case, because we make packaginglines. is every single package perfect or do some of them have leakers Lorawith some of the registrate registrated outwork, not perfect? Ultimately, thosenon perfect packages are scrap the way the math works. Is it's like a rolethrough put yield calculation? You take the percentage of ilbility times thepercentage of performance times of percentage of quality, and you get afraction that is a percentage of the perfect number of one hundred percentworld class. Oee is about eighty five percent and od at eighty. Five percentis pretty tough to get the best can get it, and it o also depends on howcomplicated the line is, because the more elements in a line they allcontribute and it's a serial calculation. So if you have twentyelements, even if throu're all ninety nine percent you're going to take a bighit on oe, let me give AU an example in my world of a packaging machine oea,and we do often achieve eighty five percent on lines not always, but oftendepends on a lot of other things. So let's take this example. Why jus? Whydo I CARE ABOUT OEA? Well, I just sold tha system to produce packages at fourhundred packages a minute. This particular company is going to runthree seven hour ships a day six days a week, fifty weeks a year, so a lotOfroun time so total gross production, if they were a hundred percent oee,would be a hundred and fifty one point. Two million packages it' a lot ofpackages, however, because we know no one gets hundred percentlee and eightyfive percent is world class. If they got eighty five percent, they wouldproduce a net of a hundred and twenty eight million point five packages.That's really good! Keep in mind. That's World Plas, if that same systemthat I just gave es examples of eighty five percent wean only at eighty threeand keep my da three is darn good too, but if it would only miss that eightyfive percent world plass by just two percentage points, they would losethree million packages a year. Three million packages Er. This particularcompany sells the product for bout, a dollar each and they have a thirty fivepercent, cose Marget, which is pretty noal. So two plits of oe just cost youthree million dollars of revenue and a million dollars a profit. That's why oematters and you could' be in ha...

...position where, if you're not producingat the rate, you thought you were even if it is 't. eighty five percent- maybeyou planned around eighty percent and you're running seventy and I've, seenit as low as forty then you're going to be shorting orders and you're going tolose customers, because you can't deliver so there's a mensin fact. Ifyou can't operate tightly that makes sense on the Oh yeah absolutely, and soso I all of a sudden, you can start framing your sales conversations aroundthis with a simple mathematical model to pain, a picture for somebody. Iimagine it's really going to resonate. It really does and we believe in Owee,so much we've outfitted all of our machines to monitor and report theiroee every day. So at the end of a shift, our machines email, a report to us andour customers- and it says: Okay, th. The OEE for this shift was eighty threepercent and of the reasons that you had downtime. We collect every single faultand we capture and count the frequency of that fault. We measure the durationof each fault and we accumulate in categories all the faults in the timethat they contributed to downtiwne. We then swoart those in to Preto typefashion and we issue the top ten contributors to Downtin right o off themachine every day. Why is that great? Because it gives you actionableinsights? Okay, number one! Here's my number one item that caused me downtime.It was a hundred minutes all right, I'm going to focus on that and ultimatelywe have our tax. Reviewing these reports every day and calling customersand saying you know you're having a lot of these faults. Typically, we findthis is the cause. You may want to look at this and we work with them to bringtheir onee up into the right over time and what happens is once you kill thenumber one reason now you work on number two and number three and newreasons emerge. So it's a way to continuously improve and get your oi upinto the right, yeah, that's great stuff. How do you bring that into asales conversation with a new prospect who you're not yet working with Kevin?What we do is we have a couple of models, tools that we built for thesales forse so that they can show the impact of Oee and we let them modeldifferent lines and ha there's a lot of user inpurts that we have a discussionabout, so that a lot of people are resistant to giving you all the data.But if you have a model and you can show Heeis how our equipment works,let's plug in some of you assumptions and actuals with some of your equipment,and let's show you the financial impact on your operation and then they startto loosen up when they see you know how big it can be and how impactful thetcan be on their on the PNL. So we build tools, spreadsheets and alike, thatallow our sales people to engage in a conversation in a friendly way thatthey can get some instant results and see if they can take it to the nextstep. L T let's go back to the second pardy question, which was TCO equallyimportant and really more of an umbrella than even Oee, but a littlebit more difficult to measure. So TCO is an Acaman for total cost ofownership. What's my total cost Bor...

...owning and operating this piece ofequipment? It's a financial estimate intended to help a byer understand,direct and indirect costs. Too often buyers just look at acquisition price.They don't look at all the other things that matter so tcil not only considersoee, but it considers other costs like training cost spir parts costs servicecalled costs, everything associated with running and producing, in my casepackages, everything that is considered, so you can say in five years or everyyear. This is my real cost for this now I give you another example: Go back tothe automobile if you've got a car that is save twentyhousand dollars to buyand another one is thirty housand, which is the better one to buy. Youdon't have enough information to answer that because you want to be total costof ownership thoughtful. So if I probably learn a little bit more aboutthese two cars, I find that the Cartus twenty thousand requires the oil to bechanged every thirty minutes. Now that's a little bit dramatic and theother car CARBI. I can change the oil once a year. Now, all of a sudden, Ican look at my total class and find out that I'm paying five housand dollas ayear in oil changes on Cara and only fiftydollars on car, be over a five orten year period that car that was fifty percent more expensive from anacquisition perspective, this fifty percent less expensive to own overallover the time life of that asset. So we shared this too, with our customers bythe way you ask about like how do we bring it into a sale cycle? We built aTCO model that allows us to work with a customer and look at their operation,and their operations are always different, so they have differentpieces of equipment that is feeding our equipment and well have downstoomequipment. We were doing casepacking and palatizing and there's differentamounts of labor on the line anytime, a machine, pausitve or isn't running. Youhave what we call stranded Labor, so you've got bodies standing around beingpaid, not producing tcol contemplates that, including contemplating the needto add overtime or extra shifts, to make up for the shortfall of yourtargeted production output. So TCO is kind of the next level of above oee,where you Zooma, and you look at the whole picture of oaning and operatingthat machine from acquisition to retirement so Kevin for those listeningwho are thinking to themselves man, we really need to overhaul the way we'regoing to market with our sales team. Where would you point them in terms ofresources for starting to make some changes? So if you don't have somefolks in house that understand these concepts, I would recommend that youget a specialist like we did back about ten twelve years ago to help youthrough the journey. I give you some highlights things that I've learnedalong this journey again. It starts with understanding your buyers journey,your buyers path. What do they go through? What's going to be comfortablefor them, you don't want to be misaligned, give an an example. Let'ssay I go on the web and I look at mortgage rates and I'm just kind ofcurious. Maybe I want to refinance my...

...house and take a little money and justrates it down, and I just look at it and I close my computer next day, somedude from rocket mortgage knocks on my door with a package to close on theworgage I'm going Na. Go. Who Are you? What are you doing here? I'm not atthat stage. I was just poking around I'm into recognition, phase and you'retrying to close me it very uncomfortable, so you want tounderstand the buyers journey. You also want to understand that most companiesnow have buying teams, not buyers. It used to be back. In the day you had oneperson that you went into brought you catalogs in, and you talked aboutequipment and you sold the deal today. The average buying team, depending onthe industry, is five or six people and they're made up of differentdepartments. There's engineering operations, sometimes marketing couldbe finance. So you need to also understand that there is a buying team,not a buying individual, and you need to understand the persones of thosebuying individuals, the individuals on the buying team, because they havedifferent winds, that they're seeking someore looking for the sexiest packagein the world, others are looking for the lowest cost or the smallestfootprint in a factory because they don't have a lot of space. So it'sreally important to identify the different people that are influencingthe buying decision. What are the personal wins they are looking for andhow do you address and satisfy those winds? So I think it's really importantto understand that Eres, a buying team and that they all have different needsand different wants and you better pay attention to all of them. I mentionedthis when you ask me about our sales process, but I think the next thing youwant to do is once you identify the bias journey and you set your ownstages, make sure that you're causing a prospect to make to execute an activitybefore you move them. Don't let the SEALES team just move people throughthe process because they're feeling good about stuff sales, people haverose cousin, color glasses because they have to they get one nose, then yesisevery day, so they have to always be optimistic and that optimism influencesthe process and distorts it. Frankly. It causes the cycle to Alonga. Itcauses the wind rapes to go down and ultimately, for the sales team to beless successful. Additionally, I'd say make sure you pay attention to anysilos in your organization that are causing friction or a lack of harmony,and I'm talking about sales and marketing. In this case, all too oftenthe sales and marketing teams are going at the market in different ways that Icoordinated whatsoever. You have to have udified, identical positioning,branding value props and that sort of thing- and you can't be having theteams targeting different accounts and with different tools and differentmessages. It just confuses everyone. You know. In the end,it's the're two sides of the same coin. To get that together, they need to belinked and synchronized, and we do that and we didn't always do it. We haoursales and marketing teams meet all the...

...time and we have common goals andstrategies. That's another thing that I would suggest there was a if there wasa reshare button. I could be pushing on everything you just said I'd be youknow hammering at home, because I think everybody everybody out there, who'sleading manufacturing organizations. Easty hear this. These are the thingswe talk about all the time and the things that I see broken. Ninety percent of the time withcompanies like you guys and I'd love, seeing that you've you've thought thestuff through you figured it out. YOUV, put processes in place and you'rereaping the benefits of that so very cool Kevin. Is there anything? I didn'task you that you'd like to add to the conversation today there is Joe,especially for the audience here. We build equipment and equipment of allsover time and gets smarter and better and more efficient. I think it'simportant for companies like US and some of the folks up in your audienceis to make sure they have a really cohesive strategy. I think it'simportant tosteat of five or ten year goal of where you going and we did thatourselves and we identified a four stage strategy that we thought wouldreally excite our customers to know where they're going keep in mind.Capital equipment lasts anywhere between ten and twenty years, so themachines that you're getting from us today are going to be around for a longlong time. Our strategy is is what we call smart connected machines and it isan evolution where our machines will get better every day an example I'lluse here, Quinc deavily enough, is going to be another car example. Idon't know I'm on the car examples today, but dumb unconnected machines iswhat cars used to be. You would buy a car and it never got better. It nevergot better gas mileage over time. It didn't have better breaking didn't havethat a safety didn't have new features. You bought it, you used it, it died.You threw it away. Tesslo came out with smart connected vehicles where everyday that passes theres an opportunity for software push that's going toimprove its safety. It's range, it's feature set that sort of thing andthat's our approach with our machines, so we're building smartconnectedmachines that are going to evolve even after you buy them they're going tocontinue to get better. Then this is where the stratege comes in, becausethey're buying machines O th last ten on twenty years. I believe a strategythat shows them how this machine is going to be better in five years andten years than it was when they bought. It is very compellent. Our forstatestrategy starts with first of all, we platforming our machines with Rockwellautomation, controls and software, and we've completed that next we haveaugment of reality for training and for Diagnostics. Many of our customers inthe food industry, especially have thirty forty, fifty percent employeeturnover so they're, always training new people, augmented reality with theuse of ipads or Hollolensas, and other things is a game changer in humanproductivity outcomes, safety and asset management. So we see thirty to fiftypercent productivity games by using Ar...

...for training and diagnostics and we'rein three pilots right now from there we're looking at collecting masses,Amout Monts of data or Gada Lakes, so that we can apply machine learning andai and then ultimately, we're able to tie the machine control system into theAR. So we can float information in the air around the machine, tell them themwhat the seal temperature is or, if there's a problem, how to fix it,guiding them physically through the machine and thred. So I think setting acompelling vision is nothing but helpful to enhancing the sales team'sability to tell the story and have it be compelling to know that mycompetitives machine is ten years is going to be as duminant as you boughtit yesterday, mine is going to be ten years of Alle at that that point. Sothat's the other part of our stor. I Want Tos Hare, that's great! I love itKevin. This was an awesome conversation so much to be learned from what youshared today so really appreciate you doing this. It's my pleasure very happyto do so. JOP. Where can our audience get in touch with you how's the bestway for them to learn more about harpack Alma as well yeah. So pleasevisit our website, which is Harkpac Dash, holmocom or contact us at email,t info at Harpack Onecom or give us a call, five o eight eight Eigh, four,twenty five hundred that sounds great and Cavin. I imagine people can findyou on linked in and connect there for sure great well great conversation, and I'm just really glad that that we gotto do this. I think some of the topics we touched on today are things thatmanufacturers are thinking about and some of them maybe embracing it, butyou know others I know aren't because I talked to a lot of manufacturing people,so a lot of good nuggets here and Kevin once again, thanks for for joining me,my pleasure to, as for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episodeof the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sale strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools specificallyfor btob manufacturers at Gerilla. Seventy sixcom flash worn. Thank you somuch fo listening until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (70)