The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode 105 · 3 months ago

It's Time for a Go-to-Market Strategy Transformation in Manufacturing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The way our customers collect information and look for products has changed, and in order to keep up with demand, manufacturers have to change the way that they approach sales and marketing.  

Today’s episode is very unique. This is a conversation that was originally recorded on Chris Grainger’s podcast: EECO Ask’s Why.    

Chris Grainger joins us from EECO, an industrial automation and power solutions company. Chris has been running the EECO Ask’s Why podcast for over 2 years and offers valuable insights on manufacturing as well as starting your own B2B podcast. Chris executed a fantastic interview with me on the go-to-market transformation in manufacturing.  

Join us as we discuss:

  •  How sales and marketing have changed in manufacturing
  •  How VOC plays an important role in GTM strategy and direction 
  •  How to clearly define your audience and figure out what matters to them

They are looking for information in different ways and those relationships of reputation will only take you so far. They will absolutely continue to play a role, but you need to be thinking about how your audience consumes information and how they buy, and you need to meet them where they are, rather than forcing the way you want to sell product on them. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving mid size manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you will learn from B tob sales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcasts. I'm Joe Sullivan, your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency Gorilla Seventy six. We're at a very unique moment in time right now. The pandemic has sped up the adoption of communication technology by five or ten years, and millennials, who never knew a time with no Internet and had iphones in their pockets when they were in middle school are moving into positions of buying power in their respective organizations. Whether you want to accept it or not, the way your future customers collect information, communicate about problems and solutions and look for products and service partners has changed dramatically, and this moment in time needs to be seen as a wakeup call to manufacturing organizations that are running the same sales and marketing playbook that they were running ten or twenty or thirty years ago, because without a Goto market strategy that involves clearly defining your audience, learning deeply what matters to them, becoming their best resource and building awareness, trust and demand in places where they already consume information digitally, your chances of winning will only fall further and further into decline over the next forty minutes. I'm going to break it all down for you as succinctly as I can. Now. I've done something entirely new with this episode and would like to thank Chris granger of the industrial automation and Power Solutions Company Echo for allowing me to republish this conversation, which he originally recorded on the ego asks why podcast. As a podcast host myself, I know firsthand how much work goes into prepping for and executing a powerful interview, and Chris died an incredible job pulling the best out of me for this one. If you're a fan of this podcast, I'm confident that you'll get a lot of value out of Chris's as well. So GO CHECK OUT EGO asks why. Now let's get into it. Welcome to ego asked why. Today we have an idea episode and we're are we talking about industrial marketing for manufacturers in two thousand and twenty two, and I'm bringing in the expert, Mr Joe Sullivan, from guerrilla seventy six. So what's up, Joe? How you doing? Doing well? Chris, good to be here. I'll man, excited to have you here on ECO asked why because I've personally, I've been founding you for a long time. You put so much great content out there. I've learned a lot from you, so I'm excited for this conversation and you know you share an artcle with me. It made a big impact. That's like, look, let's just unpack that together on ECO ASS why. Awesome. I'm ready to do it all right. Well, we have an industrial audience, so maybe set this stage for the listeners out there. So how do you explain what industrial marketing is to someone who is new to this industry? Sure? Well, I think you know, I always say that the manufacturing sector in general, you know, tends to be very sales heavy. The perception of marketing tends to be, let's go to trade shows and have a fancy booth, maybe we...

...run some print ads, maybe you're doing doing a little paper click and that's probably about as modern as we get. And our perspective on marketing for manufacturers or industrial marketing, is that marketing needs to be a revenue engine for the company. It needs to be about creating opportunities for sales, not just sort of another expense on the PN owl that is sort of a nice to have but not a must have. Absolutely mean that's that's the key part, to revenue the engine, because it is often time, like you said, just looked at as an expense. Right, yeah, that's that's pretty much what I've seen for you know, I've been been working with manufacturers for over a decade as a marketing consultant and I you know, I'm starting to see a positive mindset shift, slowly but surely, but most of the time. There's a lot of sort of educating that I and my team have to do on what role marketing actually could play versus the role it actually is playing for them. Sure. So, yeah, I mean I guess a lot of it too now shifted, just the way the people buy, you know, all lines at loted at powers now going to the to the byre itself. Right, absolutely right, you're right on the money, the right and you know that's that's a shift that's probably been happening for fifteen years now at this point. But you think about what it was like, you know, back in the say, early two thousands, where, you know, most midsize manufacturers, if they had a website at all, for example, it was you know, it was pretty primitive, not a lot of information there. You wouldn't think of it as a resource to your audience. Well, no, now you fast forward to two thousand and twenty two and you know, whether it's in your personal life or Your Business World, you think about what's the first thing you do when you're trying to figure something out? You go to Google or maybe, you know, you go to refer on network and when they pass along some resource or name of a company to you, you go check them out online, right, and so I guess the point is the way people gather information is just, you know, shifted dramatically and at such a fast pace where you know what you need to find is at your fingertips, and the same as true for the people you're trying to reach. So you for you to be able to create visibility for your business, to be able to position yourself and your company as an expert resource. That's how you're going to earn attention and trust in visibility. Yeah, that's right, because, I mean, you mentioned to be at their fingertips, so you have to be be there in the moment and when they're when they're trying to solve that problem. That's where you need to be, in front of them. But you know, in that exact moment of time. That's exactly right. And it's not just you. I always say that if you're if you're talking to procurement, you're too late, because you think about your audience and for a lot of my clients it's these are companies selling capacs, equipment, or at least at least what they're selling is, you know, requires a consultative sale and off in a longer buying process and they're talking to engineers and they're talking to plant managers and they're talking to CFOS. And so you think about the people early in the buying process for for your product or your service, and a lot of times it's people who are on the shop floor. It's it's might be welders or machinists or people operating machine, e. could be plant managers trying to increase three throughput and, you know, eliminate downtime and like. These are the people who are experiencing some kind of issue that they need to solve or trying to improve a process or achieve some goal, and you want to be their resource. You want them to you want to be able to provide them with help around what they're trying to accomplish as it relates to your area of expertise. And if you can, if you could be...

...that person to them, you're going to earn attention and trust in a lot of cases before they ever even enter a bicycle, and then you're the first one they think of when they do right. So I'm if you are manufactured then and you're trying to get in error, to be early influencer sounds like me, you know what you're trying to do. You're trying to really get in there and influence them to well, to help them, but then also influence them to use you. So how do you determine who's making those purchasing decisions if you are at manufacture out there? M Yeah, I think it comes down to just understanding your audience. You know, if you work with a lot of the lot of the clients of but we've worked with over the years, they have a variety of different audiences they serve and product lines. But if you think about you know, what are your most profitable areas of Your Business? Where you where do you see growth potential? Where you really focused on growing? Will think about you got to dial in on who the audiences, who are the types of companies you're trying to reach, and then understand who are those buying process influencers. And I mean you're going to learn these things just through experience, right, you probably know a lot of you probably already know that. You know that there's some plan engineer, automation engineer or somebody who is probably the most influential person in the buying process. And so the way we always recommend doing it is. Once you can identify who those most important influencers are, then you need to deeply understand them, and so I'm a big fan of Voice of customer work, customer interviews, spending time saying, you know, actually talking to these people in an intentional way. We've found for ourselves and for our clients as they you know, as they approach their own audiences, that people are happy to talk, you know, for you to approach some of your best customers and say, Hey, we're trying to get better at what we do, we're trying to understand, you know, how our audience look. They understand their issues better, understand what it was that led them into the buying process and what mattered to them. If you can collect those insights directly from the mouths of the people you're trying to reach so that you can then reach others who look like them and experience the same issues that they that they're having, then you've really got the foundation for, you know, starting to build a marketing strategy. Right, right. So, I mean is that is that easy to embrace? Have you seen some resistance to embrace that strategy? Because, I mean, VOC's I've been doing for years. I think they're the best way to get the the best and sail period. But I'll be honest, Joe, I've had I've struggled with salespeople, you know, leaning into that and want to do voice of customers and doing surveys and things like that, because I just I don't know why that a's like they don't see the value. So maybe gives some advice was the best way to get some buy and to get those people to lean into that of strategy. Yeah, it's funny you say that, because we see that kind of resistance sometimes too, and we push hard through it. You know, as an agency that consults manufacturers. I don't know what exactly what it is, but there is often a hesitation to say well, I mean, yeah, are you really going to get anything, anything insightful, out of that conversation? I already know the answer to that. It's absolutely we are. But convincing them sometimes they'll feel like, well, we're kind of bugging our customers. We don't want to, you know, we don't want to, you know, take time out of their day and ask them to do us a favor. Sometimes word I was going to use I've actually heard. Sure, I don't I've heard people say, I don't want to burn a favor and that's yeah, what, yeah, I think you're I think you're overthinking it. For those of you who are thinking that, I really in most cases you are. I can't speak for anybody's individual, you know, case here, and maybe some of you have arguments for why you wouldn't go talk to a customer, but you go into other industries, software, professional services, like this is just normal practice. Like I've posted things on linkedin about this in the context of manufacturing, saying talking about the resistance and and overcoming that resistance to actually having these voice of customer, customer interviews, and I get people from software commenting on this like is this a joke? Like why? How would? How is it possible that you...

...don't go talk to your customers before you do marketing work? It's just the accepted norm in other in other industries, and so I think that's one of those big shifts that has to happen. Like you know, we can all sit here and make assumptions about what our audience cares about the most and what they're buying process actually looked like and what triggers led them there and what their most common questions are. And you can gather some of these things through, you know, your sales team, you know, having conversations with your sales team and through, I don't know, in more secondhand ways. But there is no better way than to just hear it from the mouths of the exact people that you are serving. And I think it's one of those things that you just got to do it and you got it. Go do five of them and and see how people react. You know, if your sense and annoyance okay, well then then maybe you give it some second thought. But I just don't I don't think most of you will see that. I think you're going to find that people are happy to help you. And you position it as we're trying to be a better company, we're trying to understand our customers better. You're one of our best customers. We value our relationship with you and we want to hear you and and then if you position at that way, which is which is true, it's all true, people are going to be happy to help you. No doubt you have actually done this before, Joe, where I had that conversation, I've had those interviews and leaving I got question and by people that I was with part of our team. Oh why didn't sale? You know, and you were there, you had them, you're having asking all these questions, but you never brought up anything we did. And my point was that that's not that meaning like I'm building a relationship, I'm actually trying to because empathy and and you humbly asking questions and not trying to push a narrative, and maybe that's where people get tripped up. I do you see that at all? Yeah, absolutely, it's I had a on my own podcast, was probably a your ago at this point. I had Dave loomis from loomis marketing and he's kind of an expert in voc it's really his specialty. Of you see, guys short for Voice of Customer, and he talked about that being one of the biggest mistakes, like we are going in here with no intention to sell. In these customer interviews, these voice of customer sessions, we and and that needs to be communicated to your person on the other end too, because it lets because they let their guard down then and they're not going to they're going to give you real answers, and that's what you're seeking here, and this is sort of part of a bigger problem that I see is in the manufacturing sector is companies don't really understand the difference between marketing and sales. A lot like doing this voice of customer work. To me is this is marketing. This is understanding your audience so you can do a better job crafting messaging, so you can do a better job creating content to surround that messaging so you know when you go out there to try to reach people, what they're going to respond to or what they're more likely to respond too. Well, this is a precursor to sales. This is to set up better sales conversations and to create better opportunities. And if you're going to use this as an opportunity to jump in and sell, you're going to burn trust with these individuals. Then then you're going to have the problem that I think a lot of people sensus hesitation. You know that causes the hesitation is, yeah, we're going to we're going to burn the favor. Well, you need to look at this as having a different purpose. This is essentially it's market research. Yes, you know one thing, I've been doing a lot of podcast talking about cybersecurity. Hang with they for a second. I got a point, because one thing that keeps coming up is atot convergence. So those two worlds typically don't play together, you know, the at World Ot world. They stay separate. Is there a marketing sales convergence that that needs to occur and start leaning in to be able to bring these teams together, because I almost feel like it said...

US versus them sometimes, or maybe they don't see the value, you know, either side on what the others doing, you know. So just just curious. Is this common thing you're seeing across the board? Absolutely, yeah, it really is, and this is I've been talking about this for over a decade, if I'm being honest. Is You find? Yeah, I mean marketing and sales are completely different functions. They just are. They they need to be working together because ultimate the both sides of the business are there to generate revenue, and marketings side of that is marketing needs to help. Say, marketing needs to be the one to understand the audience, to uncovered the key insights that are going to lead go to market strategies. Marketing needs to be able to segment the audience and figure out where to target them, how they consume information and then to be the one behind messaging and content so that they can so that the company can create the right kind of visibility in front of the right people from the right companies and start to earn enough attention and trust so that our FQ's start happening, and and with the right people, right and then, and then it's sales that you know. I think marketing still has a role after, say, a lead is generated, to to help sales. But if they're all were, if marketing sales are working with different audiences in mind and different objectives in mind and they're not communicating, and when marketing generates a lead, if marketing makes the assumption that this is a good lead because on paper it looks good and is getting no input from sales, then you're just operating in silos here, and it's it needs to be a team effort, different roles, but a collaborate of effort, right, right. I mean I think that and that once you get that alignment, that's when great things can happen. It really can. So yeah, I'm I'm curious now to maybe we can. We'll parked that for a second because I'm curious now all, let's say marking and and sales. They're working together and they get good feedback and we and we know what our audience is looking for. We know what we want to start building for them. So how do we start working towards with our subject matter experts and use their expertise to start scaling this and creating content that really deals that trust and attention of things like that? Yeah, well, you know, you said subject matter experts, and I think that's that's kind of the key term. There is you once you once you sort of dialed in on an audience and you know who those buying process influencers are. Now it's a matter of figuring out what is most important to those people. You know, if it's some engineer, if it's a plant manager, whoever, those those key influencers, are what matters most of them. What are the triggers that lead them in the buying process? The common questions are trying to get answered, the pains they're experiencing, the objectives are trying to achieve. You uncover some of that through those customer interviews. You uncover some of that through talking to your sales team and your you know, your account managers and the people who interact with those people. And so now you know what what the content topics need to be and where how you need to craft messaging. And so now you do as you go to those subject matter experts. Who are the people on your side? It's often technical professionals, sometimes it's maybe sales engineers, the people who who's have the expertise on your team to be able to address those common questions and address those pain points and help your prospects figure out how to get to a solution and maybe what total cost of ownership would look like if you did it this way versus this way, and what the timeline to ro I would look like in different ways to price things and all the things that matter to that...

...person you're trying to reach an influence. You think about who are the people on your team most qualified to be the helper to those people, and those are the people whose brains you need to tap into to to create content that surrounds your messaging. And when I'm talking about content, I'm talking about you know, it could be written content, it could be video content, it could be podcast episodes like this that address those things. It could be hosting live events like webinars or other kinds of digital events and there are a ton of different ways to produce content, but those insights really need to come from the people on your team who have spent their careers, you know, becoming experts in in those things and can position you as a thought leader and expert advisor, while actually helping the people that you're trying to reach an influence. Let's take a quick break to say thanks to this episode. Sponsor, Electrical Equipment Company is building a better tomorrow row today. ECO serves the manufacturing plants, machine builders and construction teams that make communities strong today and better tomorrow. They're committed to having the high quality products their customers need and where they need them. But that's not enough to meet today's challenges. A full line electrical distributor, ECO specializes in industrial automation and power solutions that produce costs, increase reliability and improve performance. Driven by ideas to make an impact for their customers, ECO invests in the capabilities required to increase understanding, drive recommendations and take action. Their heroes are those that build things and keep them running. They have a heart for serving and encourage others to keep asking. Why Visit Eco onlinecom that's e CEO Onlinecom to learn more. Sure not so. I mean you get the subject matter expert, though. So so some of those they have different skill sets and there are comfort levels and creating these contents in different areas. So do you do you try to force around hit peg it to a square whole type thaying where, or do you just take some of their natural abilities, so maybe they're more of a better writer, and try to use that skill and then look for other areas to create the video content? Thanks like that. And I'm just trying to think about that exbed engineer who who knows a lot right now but maybe little camera show. Maybe he's not the best writer or she she's not. You know, just feeling a going on a podcast that she would freeze up. So how do you work with them? These some of the those areas of creation? Yeah, that's I mean that's a great question and it's one we run into all the time, because not only may an engineer be an expert but not want to write or not feel comfortable on camera, but that person has a job to do in the company and it's not marketing in most cases. Right now, I think in a top down organization, organization where that from the top down. President or CEO says hey, this matters and some percentage of these people's time has to be devoted to helping with marketing, even if it's literally one percent of their time. You know, I think that that's going to work best. But the reality is, like you said, a lot of subject matter experts are not going to be the best people to physically create the content, and so I talk about the role of the marketer as being the facilitator of content creation. I think there are instances where the marketer can can actually make the content on behalf of of you know, the team, but you know, so few to few examples here. Right. So we do something at guerrilla at my agency, for ourselves. We do it for our clients. We call it knowledge extraction day. We put we plan, you know, we figure out those content topics ahead of time through the process I've already talked about, and we will put a videographer on on site for a day, sometimes two days, and we get those subject matter experts lined up and maybe it's...

...this engineer and the CEO or it's, you know, this plant manager in this engineer or something, and we will we will get them talking about a topic and will facilitate a conversation. We've got cameras rolling on them and we'll come out of there with a couple hours worth of video footage that we can break up into ten long form videos and twenty short form videos for all kinds of different purposes. That's one way to do it. That's that's kind of a higher production value way. Another way we do it that we've been doing it. We've been do it this way for years, is you use a journalist and it could be you, could be in somebody inside your company, could be a freelancer, could be an agency, but you get somebody who knows how to pull insights out of people through interviewing. And so what we'll do is we'll do a little research ahead of time, we'll plan our interview and we'll jump onto zoom call with a subject matter expert for twenty minutes and we will interview that person and get the insights out of their brain and then we'll write the content on their behalf and they'll review it and probably offer a few suggested edits. But it's not it's a lot different than setting somebody off and saying okay, go we need we need to write content about this very technical topic. Go figure it out, right it. I mean, that's that's going to it's going to be garbage, right, like the insights have to come from the brain of the expert. So in that case it's the marketers job to pull those out and be able to turn that into content in some way. Right, exactly. You know, some mean that. I was just curious how you're going to do that. There were because for me, he or Dgo, I've been able to see be somewhat of a translator, you know, from an engineering standpoints. I have an engineering background. I've been able to work hand in hand with marking because I see the value. But I don't think that's the common approached it. You know, maybe business have. No, it's not, and I think you're unique and hit in that sense, honestly, because you've kind of because you are you. You do come from an engineering background and you do see the value. That's the first, you know, first hurdle to get through is helping the technical professionals who have their own job to do at the company to see why their involvement and content creation, for example, is is essential and why it matters. So I think there's an education element. That has to happen first so they understand why, you know, taken thirty minutes out of their day once a month to help the marketing team produce some insights is going to matter to the organization. Great Point, very point. I'd say. One thing that gets turns heads is demand. So maybe we just speak to that for a little bit. So how could that manufacture create demand and be more proactive, because that could that gets whence MAG gets right there. Sure. So, all right, kind of this is sort of a process we've talked about here right where it's identify the audience who learn what matters to them. You create content around those things. Now here's where I think a lot of manufacturing organizations kind of miss is they they sit back that, you know, the published great content on their site and maybe you've got a learning center, Resource Center, a blog or whatever you want to call it, or they're publishing insights and then they kind of sit back and they wait for people to show up and find it. And I mean, I'm a huge advocate for search engine optimization and doing it right, but I also know that you can't just rely on Google to to, you know, fill up your inbox with our fq's. I mean, maybe you can if you're a big organization that you know a name that everybody knows and you've have a longstanding reputation, but for most kind of midsize manufacturers that we talked to, like there is you have to be proactive about going out and getting your message and value proposition and helpful content surrounding that and success stories that illustrate how you've brought those concepts to life with other companies that look like the people you're trying to reach. And so when you you ask about demand generation, Chris, and what that means to me is we need to go out and understand where the people who're trying to reach...

...consume information online, Google, Linkedin, facebook, believe it or not, and we need to intercept them where they are already consuming information. So, you know, one example of this would be something we've found to be wildly successful in a lot of ways is putting some paid media budget behind, say, your linked in effort as a manufacturer and and saying, okay, linked in. Take this video of my expert engineer talking about total cost of ownership on this, you know, around this piece of equipment or something like that, or this case study where we are telling very briefly and concisely a success story we've had with the exact type of customer trying to reach Linkedin. Show that video to the Tenzero, you know, process engineers in these ten states in the eastern United States that are at companies of this size in these industry articles, and once people from those come, once those exact individuals have on average seen that video three times, then start showing this case study that, you know, illustrates how that problem was brought to life to those exact people, once they've seen that three times, and start showing this ad that sort of talks about Roy and drives to a request a quote page. So this is sort of the power of, you know, going out where people consume information online, because people will not go to Google until they are looking for something and have an need. And for most of you listening right now, a majority of your audience is not actively buying what you sell right now or tomorrow or even this week. Maybe two to five percent of them actually are, but especially the more complex and big ticket your your product or offering is. You know, those bicycles only come around so often and so you need to be in these channels where they are already consuming information, creating value for them, teaching, position yourself as a thought leader so that when they enter a bicycle and they go to Google and they google search something and they see your name, they already know your name and they trust they trust you, and you're the first one they call. Or, better yet, they don't even go to Google, they just call you first because they already know your name. The mistake people make is they they treat everybody like they're in buying mode right now, and that's where it's that sales mentality. Let's just blast sales messaging at people, let's rely on Google only. Well, you know, a majority your audience isn't going to Google right now. So how are you going to capture the other ninety five percent? You have to be where they are and be delivering value to them, not just trying to sell product. No doubt, no doubt there was a you nailed a ton of insight right there now. And I am curious, though, because you got manage management out there, and you know we have management. I'm working with to to they won't understand. They want to get the impact. Look at the Ur know what metrics are. Important, and I'm not about the vanity metrics man. I mean likes and all that stuff doesn't matter. I mean I'm curious from you what are the metrics that that matter and what should they be looking at it to make sure that this marking effort is working? Yeah, so I think the first thing to address here is that there's a bit, very big difference between business outcomes and marketing KPIS, and I see those things being mistaken often, as you know, for the kind of being the same thing. So when I talk about business outcomes, I'm talking about revenue, pipeline, pipeline revenue, revenue, actual quote opportunities and resulting revenue. These are the outcomes that you are looking for. Now you have to look at I think we're companies also get, you know, confused, though. If you've got a sixmonth sales cycle, you're not going to you're not going to launch a marketing campaign and see a positive Roli in less than six months, or probably in less than nine to twelve months, realistically, right. Same thing if you deployed a a new salesperson tomorrow and you've got a six month sales cycle, you know, if you fire that person before they hit the...

...six or nine month mark, you never gave them a fair shot, and so I think what you need to look at is what is a reasonable timeline, first of all. But the metrics you want to look at is, you know, ultimately, is revenue growing? Is is pipeline growing before revenues growing? These are your North Star metrics. And if you have the right measurement systems in place, if you have using a marketing automation software like hub spot, if you're if you are actively using a crm like sales force, and you have those systems talking to each other, then all of this is measurable. Everything you do out there for the most part, is measurable. So you know, talk about other matrics, like things that that matter, as KPI's. Are you know, things like you know, is our our key rankings and search engines growing, for you know the keywords that matter most your business, especially high intent keywords, like keywords that would indicate some buying intent? Is is organic traffic growing and and especially traffic that is entering through pages on your site that you know are related to the products you actually are you know are actually profitable to your business. Are you generating leads through your site that are actually actually match your ideal customer profile. Like all of these things matter, but they are barometers to show, if to tell you whether you are moving in the right direction toward. What are those actual business outcomes? HMM, pipeline and resulting revenue. Does that make sense? Does it does? So I'm still just trying to understand, you know, because so much of it is around content and videos and blogs and things like that. So it's trying to understand. There are their numbers. You know, a lot of sounds for us when we're looking at Youtube. We're trying to lean into youtube a lot now. So we're trying to understand is it is it views more, as it comments more, or is it's, you know, is it bounces from those videos to our website that leads to the to the pipeline generation like you're talking about? Was it? We're still trying to figure out all that out. Dude. I'm sure there's many, many factors out there in the same boat. Yeah, you know, and something we also talked about a lot is that, like attribution is a very messy thing. It just is. There's not, you know, if you're kind of looking for the silver bullet, there where you can say I did, I posted this blog post and it led to this many leads which resulted in this much revenue. You're probably not looking at the whole picture here. I'll give you an example. So this is this comes from our own business. At Gorilla we had we were running a video. It was a video of me actually talking on camera about how manufacturers need to shift their marketing mindset to a more revenue focused, you know, it's kind of what we're talking about here. But it is just a concise, you know, two three minute video and we did what I described earlier. We we were putting a linkedin budget behind, like a paid budget behind it, saying we want to target CEOS and presidents of manufacturers in the US who do ten million to two hundred million year in sales and are of this size. We want to show this video to those exact people. Okay. Well, so we were running that and we were looking at things like, you know, what percentage of this video is actually getting consumed? Are People dropping off before the fifty percent mark? And we were finding that, you know, seventy five percent of people were watching seventy five percent or more of the video. Like that tells me like there's engagement. We've run other videos where, you know, people are dropping off after three seconds and so you can make decisions. They're about okay, this content is being consumed by the people were trying to reach this topic matters, but then taking it a step further and getting, you know, looking at you. How do you look at this holistically? Well, so we got an inquiry from a very qualified lead on our site one day and I went into hub spot, which is our software for we use it for our crm...

...and our marketing automation software, and I said, okay, where did this lead originate? And it showed me that this particular person, who had like a marketing manager job title, she found us through a google search, organic google search right landed on our home page. So what that tells me is, if she landed on our home page, she probably looked for either industrial marketing agency or she probably searched gorilla seventy six. If she was searching for a manufacturing marketing or something like that, she probably would have Google would have served her a different page that was targeting that keyword. So so the first thing I could gathers, okay, she probably knew who we were or she searched industrial marketing agency. So I went. So we looked into our linkedin ads platform and we saw that the CEO of that company had given a thumbs up and commented on our AD. There it is okay. So so if I was not looking at this holistically, I would have said, okay, this is an organic search lead. She Google searched and found us. So let's attribute this to Google and let's do more seo, because that's how she found us and that's how good leads are finding us. No, this company found us through our linkedin add and what happened in the background that I validated when I actually talked to this woman on the phone, is that, yeah, my CEO saw a video of you guys talking about how marketers need to shift their manufacturers need to ship their marketing mindset and he told me to call you. So what did she do? She went to Google to search for girls seventy six, she clicked on our home page, she requested a consultation and so so it's just an example of why you know to look for that that silver bullet again. Yeah, it's going to make it's going to lead you to make decisions that already even accurate. Right, right. I could have reinvested everything into Seo if that sort of thing was happening. But if I didn't have the all the information, I would never realize that this linkedin campaign is driving really good opportunities for us. Yeah, they're just converting on our site by coming through a different channel. It's a great mass of great story, great store because it has it all together. You know, and maybe one of the last things I wanted to touch base with the own Joe is when you think through manufactures, you know, distributor, the same way, you have your marketing teams and for for most, from what I can sell at least, they're really small. You know, want two people, you know, maybe five, I don't know. But sales teams they're pretty big. You know, there's a lot of sales resources. So how does that factor and when you're when you're looking at, you know, measuring impact from a marketing standpoint, does that overall number of assets, if you will, should that factor in at all? Should should management think about that? Yeah, I mean, you know, you say some of these companies may have a few people, maybe five. You know, in most cases, when I'm the companies that we work with are probably, you know, on average, maybe I don't know if you took an average, you're probably working with thirty, forty million dollar manufacturers. Most of them have any were from zero to to marketing people in house, right, and often it's, you know, if it's one person, it's kind of a generalist who, you know, maybe came from a marketing background, maybe just started wearing that hat at one point and then, you know, that became their primary role, right. And so yeah, I mean they're the way I look at is somebody's got to do the work if you're going to have an impactful marketing program like this is not you go turn on some Google ads and then hope that leads start pouring in. Like there are complexities to this. We've talked about a lot of the work that goes shut into this, from, you know, doing the the customer research and Voice of customer to creating content, to, you know, deploying demand generation campaigns, to being able to measure results and manage all this in the software in the back end. And somebody's got to do that work. So it's it's to evaluate the impact of a marketing program or, you know, the impact of the people working on it. You know it's not. It's not a simple thing. I'm not exactly sure how it's your question, but but most resources inside of manufacturers of kind of...

...in that midsize category, they tend to be their ninety percent sales and and when you when that's when. That's the way you're set up. Well, you're set up to do a lot of, you know, relationship nurturing and cold calling and flying around the country going to trade shows, and I'm not saying you shouldn't be doing that, but there's a huge missed opportunity to be generating demand and to be filling up your those inboxes with opportunities that are generated through marketing. But until the mindset shifts, until it's until until manufacturing leaders can stop saying yeah, marketings are nice to have and they make the website look nice and post pictures of susie's new dog and the company, you know, volleyball tournament at the company Picnic, I mean you got to shift your mindset about the purpose of marketing in the first place before you can really start evaluating its impact. And well, I'm glad we went there, because you are hanging on the room right there, buddy, I mean that the mindset has to shift. It does, and I mean it's the values there. So I mean thank you for your insight, for for what you have back there. Joe Has Been Awesome. We we call it ECO. Asked why those you normal wrap up with a whack question. So maybe too for our listeners out there. Why should they lean into this industrial marketing idea? Because I think it's critical to success of manufactured in future. But I'm curious on what's your whow would be. Yeah, I think if I had to break it down into one thing, it's just the fact that referrals and repeat business and reputation like those, those three ours, are kind of the things that most manufacturers that are second third generation family owned businesses, and a lot of the companies I talked to like this is. This is how they've built their business and and good for you. That's I mean, that's you know, for companies who have built their success on, I'm just doing it, having a great product and building great relationships and hiring a using people and having phenomenal customer service like that's fantastic and I think just the challenge today, though, is that, like we talked about, the very beginning. The way people are buying is changing and the more the more that the next generation starts to move into leadership roles at the companies you're trying to reach, and not only leadership rolls but all kinds of roles. You know they're they are looking for information in different ways and those relationships and reputation will only take you so far. They will absolutely continue to play a role, but you need to be thinking about how your audience consumes information and how they buy, and you need to meet them where they are rather than forcing the way you want to sell product on them. That's right. got a meet and where of the armor for an very good would joe. This has been great. Thank you so much. You unpacked the time for the listeners out there. Check out the show. Knows Joe. Where do you want to go to connect with you see all the wonderful things you're doing at Eger seventy six? Sure, so, gorilla, like the Animal Geour, I'll an sixcom. I would probably direct you to our learning center. You'll find it in the top navigation and we produce just a ton of content, video, podcast episodes, written content for specifically for manufacturing leaders and marketing people. In the manufacturing sector. So I direct you there. My podcast is the manufacturing executive. It is for CEOS and presidents and see sweet and marketing leaders at manufacturing companies. I'd send you there as well, and I'm one of ten million Joe Sullivan's on Linkedin, but if you know put together Joe Sullivan and Grilla seventy six, you'll find me there. So please reach out absolutely and for and to make it even easier for you guys, go check out the show notes. Will have all those links. There's for you. You can connect directly with Joe. So thank you so much for your time today, Joe. Thanks for having me Christ this was a lot of fun. Yes, sir, you've been...

...listening to the manufacturing executive podcast. To ensure that you never missed an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for B Tob Manufacturers at gorilla seventy sixcom learn. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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