The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 3 months ago

The NFL Draft, The NBA Draft and... The Manufacturing Skills Draft? w/ Dr. Jason Scales

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You’ve probably heard about the infamous skills gap in manufacturing — a problem only made worse by the pandemic.

It has the potential to affect our lives in profound ways; even our national security is at stake.

And if we expect to solve it, we need to get creative — like, say, starting a nationally-televised Skills Draft?

That’s one of the creative solutions today’s guest, Dr. Jason Scales, Business Manager, Education at Lincoln Electric, proposes to avoid the coming skills depression.

In this episode, we discuss:

- Why COVID widened the skills gap

- What a Skills Draft is and why it could change the national culture around high-skilled employment

- What manufacturers should be doing to help today’s youth get excited for —and see a viable future in — the industry

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

All these youth what they start doingas they start forming these ideas, I'm going to be that NBA player, I'm goingto be that NFL player and they set their sides on that goal right. Whycan't we do the same with skilled traits? Why can't we bring industrytogether? Why can't we bring these students together, say we're going tohave a skills draft welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here. You'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles and you'll learn from Bob Sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get into the show, welcome to another episode of theManufacturing Executive Podcast, I'm Joe Sullivan your host and a Co founderof the Industrial Marketing Agency guerilla. Seventy six with the firstpick of one thousand nine hundred and ninety four NBA draft, the MilwaukeeBucks Select Glen Robinson from Perdue University, there's a sound bite. Ivividly remember from my childhood growing up as a huge sports fan inWisconsin and although big dog Glen Robinson could have been Jason Kid orGrant Hill in that number one spot, he did all right for us. The NBA draft mayhave been second only to Christmas as the best day of the year as a kid meand my best friend Dan Carrie would do mock drafts for days, leading up to itand we'd set up shop in one of our basements and then we'd watch. Thewhole thing play out start to finish. So why am I telling you this, becausemy guest today will pose the question for you? Why do we only do this insports as we educate and train the next generation of welders, machinists andso on? Why not celebrate the launch of their careers, draw attention to theirachievements and skills and make a big deal about it for all these youngworkers, their parents, the companies...

...who frankly meet them now more thanever? Let's call it the skills draft. In this episode, we're going to talkabout educating the next generation of the manufacturing work force and how tomake the skilled trades more exciting to its future stars. So, let's get intoit. Dr Jason Scales is the business manager,education for Lincoln, electric he's responsible for strategic planning andthe management of his company's education, team and product portfolio.Dor Scales serves on the number of boards and his participated in numerousspeaking engagements panels and byline articles on the subject of the changingface of technical education and creating paths for addressing thecurrent skills gap in manufacturing and construction before joining LincolnElectric door skills served on the staff at the University of CentralMissouri as an associate professor of agriculture following a career inagricultural education, he earned his doctor of philosophy in agriculturaleducation at the University of Missouri Jason. Welcome to the show. Well,thanks for having US Joe, you bet well Jason, let's get right into it. If, ifI'm not mistaken, I think you told me that Lincoln Electric has the longestrunning welding school in the world, and I love to hear you talk about thehistory of the program, how it's evolved, and especially in recent yearssince you've been there absolutely and thanks for having, as on today, it's apolity to talk about this and and really talk about the skills gap andwhat's going on with current Echal education and how we're going toaddress this thing. And you know with our us our journey started in nineteen.Seventeen with our welding school and interesting was, if you remember,nineteen and seventeen from history, there's a little thing going on calledWorld War. One and the US army needed a way to figure out. How can I get andrepair equipment that may be damaged during the war efforts, get them backin and so on, and they basically call it on Lincoln Electric and said: Canyou help us in training our infantry men, a group of soldiers in welding? Wethink we can use welding t assist us in...

...the war efforts and everything, and sothat's really where we started our welding school and it was so successful.We just left it running all the way since then, and we've Alven engaged inthis notion of welding education, because you know, as we started andstarted in the welding industry, we needed to educate people on that. Weneeded to bring that to the forefront and really make it a viable solutionfor joining materials. How are you going to build the sky scrapers? Howare you going to build the tanks how you going to build the ships and theboats, because we may have been riveting at that time and so you'retransforming that with a new technology of welding and then as it's evolved, weuse our well school not only to train new welders, but even today it becomesour research and Development Facility, for how are we going to strengthenwelding education, both domestically and internationally? What new curriculado we need? What new tools do we need how we engage dudes in the weldingbooths in the classroom? So it really is one of those dynamic things that, aswe look at it, it will continue to evolve but is core to our mission here,Lincoln Alecto, that's cool! What's changed, you know, especially in recentyears. I just think of all the technology. That's found its way into.I mean every facet of our lives and then what happened in the world youknow for the last sixteen months or so. I'm just curious. What's changed interms of welding education, if it anything right, I mean you thinkwelding right, you're, just welding. What real technology do you need inwelding? What do you think about industry? Four Point, oh, and whatwe're doing with data data acquisition, data controls computer is integratinginto welding equipment to where we can control that welding process to theinfinite degree. But when you think about education, how do I use virtualassimilation? How do I use these technologies in a welling booth becausewe need to develop that welder faster, and I need to develop moreproficiencies in that welder and interesting just hot off the press. Wedid a study with case date and Wu tech...

...out in Kansas and one of theinteresting things when we introduce technology like our VERTEX simulator intowelling education, we not only make a better welder and able to train themfaster, but we found that we actually develop a new level of confidence inthat individual to where they almost feel like. I'm, the Superman and ship,a woman of welding and and I'm going to go out and get the best job I can andthey had such a high placement of those individuals that were in that thatstudy with Vertex. It was very surprising not to me or others that areclose to it, but that level confidence to give that young person that newperson air in the workforce. It was just an incredible thing to see happen.It's really cool you're, of course, in this welding corner of themanufacturing world. But I've talked to a number of people on this podcast overthe last few months that I really know hit in this. This topic of skilledlabor gap from a number of angles- and you know I had mad goose, who is up inWisconsin and he's helped helping run an organization called CardinalManufacturing, which is a essentially a machine shop running inside the wallsof a high school. We they've got high school kids, you know learning to bemachinists as part of their school curriculum alongside math and science,and drew crow or Andrew Crow on recently as well. Talking about youknow getting young people involved and excited about manufacturing and, as anyou know, alternative to those who are feel the pressure to go to college whencollege may not be right for them or people who are working at you know,frankly, working at McDonald's and there's opportunities to go. You knowlearn how to be a machinist or maybe, in your case, a welder, and I think,there's just it's becoming very clear to me that there is a sort of gap inthe way that the opportunities in all corners of manufacturing are beingcommunicated to really the next generation. So just kind of curious tohear your take on that. If you agree,...

...if you're seeing kind of the same thing,you know I do and if you think about manufacturing like we link an electric,our manufacturing center is bright. It's well lit it's clean. We usetechnology during the manufacturing phase and a lot of people don't realizethat they still have images of the old dirty smoky. You know gringemanufacturing site to where you know, they're just sweating and just tryingto crank out parts, and that's just not really what it looks like anymore todayand the opportunities that are out there. Just is incredible, and I tellmy kids all the time. If I knew then what I know today- and I was eighteen-would I be dor scale sitting in his chair? I don't know- I really don'tknow, because the opportunities are out there and manufactory and and theskilled trades, and I mean think about being a plumber. The lack of plumberstoday is so significant, but you know think about what happened over the lasteighteen months. We have now four academic terms that have been that weredisrupted by Ovid, so the ability to certify New People to enter in theworkforce. You know when you had all these people laid off and thehospitality industry went down, and now you have all these different incominworkers and there they're trying to get back in the workplace, but they may nothave the right skills to get a manufacturing. So it's almost like wehave not only do we have a skills gap. We have a mismatch of skills becausethe incomin work force may have had a different line of work. Now they have to shift to get intoanother new line of work right, and so it's going to be up to us to figure outhow do we fast track short term credentials or get those stackablecritical certificates, whatever we need to do to get those people crosstraining to get them employable faster, and you know that skills gap that wetalked about five years ago and people really couldn't point to it. Theycouldn't say this is why this is going on. What D Y think we're not motivating?Kids, to get in it, Ovid is a tangible point that we can now point to say wegot. We truly have a skills gap d. We...

...truly have a challenge of front of usand we've got to figure out how to get this thing, how to get a solve yeah.For sure I mean it's for all the it kind of just shed light it sort ofamplified. You know the issue put light on. It gave you something tangible topoint to right, and but it's so pervasive today we work with a program called projectmanufactory, it's actually sponsored by the Department of Defense and thereason there's sponsoring this. It's almost that the lack of skilled workforce is almost a national security risk, and so you know the Department ofDefense is funding this project and Lincoln Electric and Hoss Manufacturing.CNC are part of this, and we put on these contests all around the UnitedStates to try and promote these trades to youth, to make it more excitingbecause you know who's going to build the ships tomorrow. If I don't havewelders who's going to build the aircraft to more. If I don't have a beit a drone or a human flight type aircraft, you know those things aretangible and we need there's a lot of people interest in this with NA ofNational Association of manufacturers, we were just on the phone with them.Yesterday is highly interesting in how are we going to get not only today'swork or force, but what about the alternative work force? So what aboutattracting women into manufacturing it and really bringing them into the foldof manufacturing? What are we going to do with thin carceration that weregetting rehabilitated that now can be active in the workforce, actually havea meaningful life and get a substance of living and not worried about goingback to their old ways? How do we look at these different areas of theworkforce we may not have looked for in the past, but really get them involved,get them skilled up and make them a part of the solution. That's going tobring us forward to to solve this, this gap that we have of that talentpipeline yeah. You bring up a really interesting point that you know we needto look in different places right, it's not not the traditional places wheremaybe we've been looking for labor, I mean you named a few a few of them andI think that's that mindset shift and...

...thinking creatively about how do wereach different audiences? That could be a part of this work force is goingto be really important. Absolutely I mean you know we're engaged all overthe board. We're engaged with epitha we're engaged with skills. You S saywe're engaged with many of the job cord around the United States were engagedin many community colleges, but you know the American welte society says weneed three hundred thousand welders by two thousand and twenty five to fillthis gap that we have right. Is it really possible for public education toproduce three hundred thousand welders to fill the knees by two thousand andtwenty five? I would argue- probably not so where's that extra work whereit's going to come from and it's going to come from all of these alternativepopulations that we need to skill up and train and that Skilling up intraining is going to look different and I think you're going to start to seemanufacturers really teaming up with the education agencies in their region.A Community College, a career Tech Center, high school, private whatever.But you know it's not only going to be a public education. That's a part ofthis solution. Manufacturers and people that need that work force are alsogoing to become part of that solution where they may have training in theirown institution. They they may take a trained welder, take in the rest of theway to make them theirs. They may need a an electrician or a maintenanceperson that can maintain all types of different equipment of plumbers. Ithink you're just going to start to see a shift where there's going to be someownership on the employers side and there's still going to be thateducation piece on the other side and that may be done through a prentishipprogram. Workforce Development, all these different things, but I think wejust got to start thinking outside the box and really looking in differentareas and and trying to find these little solutions. Yeah well said: Jason.I've had a number of guests on the show, come from the land of robotics and AIand automation. Industry. Four point o from you know all different angles: oneguest I'm just sort of thinking of right now this is a recent episode, wasAndy Lansbury's, the president of a...

...company, that's in a based in Columbus,Ohio, called path. Robotics there is super impressive, autonomous welding,robotics company and so his company's attacking the skills gap from thestandpoint of you know putting robots into places where traditionally humanshave done the work because, frankly, their customers are finding that theycan't find the Labor right and some I'm just kind of curious from your anglelike what do you think the future of welding looks like in terms of humanversus robot implementation or whatever word I should be using there right? Iguess it kind of goes back to the mere. When Excel came out, when Microsoft ICcell came out as a while back, we thought. Well, all the accounts aredone now. We have excelled so accountings done well, accountingdidn't go away and excel didn't expire out. The accounts. What happened wasexcel, became a tool to use a new skill set was born D and an accountant maylook a little different right. So I don't, I don't think robots areautomations really going to displace workers. I think it may change thelandscape of the work force. I think skills may shift, but if you thinkabout welding automation makes sense when it's a highly repetitive multipiece. I need to do it over and over and over and over again that it makessense, but that may be in the automotive space in manufacturing. Thatmay be where I'm building you know poles the hole down telephone poles,and I got a well on a spiral jig on of this and is highly repetitive andautomation makes a lot of sense, but it didn't displace that welder that welderstill has to operate that cell. The welder still has to do different thingsand monitor those situations. So the skill set changed, and you know thatmyth of that, if we, if we automate were T, is placing workers, we're notdisplacing workers, were shifting the skills needed in the work course ofthat time and a lot of these industries like welding, you may see robotics orautomation, come into one sector of it,...

...but there are so many industry segmentsand welding that were always going to need that skilled welder. That canreally go in Dil it in and well with their hands and make that product andmake it happen. That's not going to go away, and so I don't see thatautomation is a threat. Actually, I think it's a very good thing and it'sjust going to enhance the skills or we're going to have to kind of mend alittle bit, but I really find it a pause. Yeah good take, I think, I'mhearing mostly the same as far as automation is concerned, and it's funnyit's like there's, I think, there's a perception among the general publicthat wrote me. Robots are going to take our jobs and, as we all know, right now,it's we need. Somebody to fill the jobs and if anything, robotics is helpingthe situation but yeah I was, I was kind of curious to get your take on ityeah. You know you introduced when we talked a week or two ago andpreparation for this conversation. You interest a really interesting idea,which was the skills draft and rather than me, trying to explain what I thinkyou had in mind there Goin to let you put on the mill kiper had you know onPan and talk about what's the skills draft, but in the context ofmanufacturing or or welding specifically yeah. I got to be carefulbecause somebody somebody is going to take me up on this and say we're goingto we're going to make this happen scales. Let's go make an ate yeah. Well,hopefully they do right, but in essence you know weparted with a group called National Coalition of certification, centers andthere's other groups that do similar. Things like this and NC. Three reallyinstitute is something called a national signing day. So when highschool students go to college and they play sports for college, there'susually a signing day at that high school, where the students signing aletter of intent, it's a big celebration: the student gets a youknow: A scholarship they're going to go, play football, a cross or basketball,and we're going to get financial assistance to go. Do that at thatinstitution it's going to help them get a leg up on their education can be agreat thing right. So that's all...

...wrapped around sports. Well, theconcept is why don't we do that around the skilled trades? So now here'ssomebody actually signing a letter of intent, their mom and dad. Are therethe grandma, a GRANDPA's or families there they put a ball cap on em. Theytake a picture. They have somebody announcing this thing over the Internet,a streaming live family members can watch it and it's so powerful that whena school puts it on, they may think well, we'll have seventy five peopleshow up. I had one school that had to double the diesel program, because somany people showed over the national signing day. It was over four hundredindividual sites showed up for that day. Now this is being streamed over theInternet everybody's there. You guys speakers are calling out their name.Hey Joe Solman just signed that letter and Daddy's going to this communitycollege he's going to get that degree and computer ated drapping he's goingto be a champion out there in the field and by Golly. Thank you, Joe for comingto day and they're taking pictures, and you know it's a big thing right when wedo that in sports we have these signing days and sports. We make a big thingout of it. Well then, we had this huge draft at the end ofthe school year we call the NFL draft, the NBA draft and so on, and wecelebrate the top athletes that are going on to professional, athletics andand they're going to be in the NBA of the NFL. We don't really talk about thedollars are going to make me all assume what they're going to make, but wecelebrate that and there's you know millions of people watching this on TVand so all these youth, what they start doing as they start forming these ideas.I'm going to be that NBA player, I'm going to be that NFL player and theyset their sides on that goal right. Why can't we do the same with skilledtraits? Why can't we bring industry together? Why can't we bring thesestudents together, say we're going to have a skills draft, and here we gotall these students they're going to apply and they're going to interviewthey're the best of the best right and how awesome would it be that now we'reannouncing out there, the skills draft and here's company a and they're, goingto pay thirty thousand dollars to get the number one draft tick for thewelder? They value this person so much...

...they're going to pay in thirty thousanddollars for the number one draft pick all moneys go back to the program fromwhich the student comes and that's how we're going to get people excited aboutskills. That's how we're going to get people excited about skilled trades.Wouldn't you like to be the family member of the MOM and dad that your sonor daughter just got picked for the number one draft. I don't Care Bon. Thecomputer at a drafting, nursing occupational therapy, welding buildingtrades what it is, but if we really would to excite the public and reallybring some momentum to what we can do with getting skill trades going, we'vegot to make it exciting. We've got to make it relevant and we've got to getpeople to understand that these are true jobs that are very well payingjobs, their high wage, high skill unless reward these people or be in thetop- and I think it'd be a cool thing to happen. That's one of the coolestideas. I've heard in a long time honestly, and it's one of my favoritethings. I've heard somebody talk about on this show. I can't wait to get somemore eyeballs on this ears. I should say I guess on on this concept, becauseI hope somebody does take you up on it. I think it's so cool. I just thinkabout all you know: I'm a creative guy come from a the run, a marketing agency.I came from a design background before I did this and I'm thinking of like howyou could make a production out of this and make it something really specialthat would it would be fun. It would be meaningful to the kids, to the parents,to the organizations and be so much pride involved in it. So love it. Well,I mean we hear this welling school we've never really had a graduation forour comprehensive program. Four years ago I said, look we need to have agraduation, it's a sixteen week program, but we need to have a graduation, andyou know how much pride that these parents, husbands, wives, kids, takefor somebody committing to a program finishing the program and beingrecognized for that effort, and you don't realize that what that really isuntil you have a commencement and you witness it- I mean we've all been tohigh school graduation. We've all been...

...to college graduate, not maybe not all,but but for for a family member that it could be the first time so one ofsomebody in their family graduated from something after high school they're,the first generation- and they know they're, going to go on to success andgo get a better job and they're going to make their lives better than they'regoing to move on. That's a great thing, and if we don't start celebrating thisacross the board and recognizing this with our people, what's the motivationfor them to go? Do it it's yeah. They always have the intrinsic motivation,but man we can make it a whole lot better. If we just did some smallthings, I think it's so smart and just for the record, I was teared up when mydaughter had her kindergarten graduation about two months ago, so yeah where that tear in your eye,because you know it's about Rey to be over, she can be eighteen tomorrow, nokidding right, Oh man! No, it's such a great concept. I think it's so cool, soI love that we're putting this idea out there and I hope it spurs some ideasfor people who are listening right, so Jason during the welding corner of themanufacturing like what is speaking more generally. What do you think thatmanufacturing organizations, whether they're in some, whether thefabricators, whether they're you know machine builders or whatever it is?What do you think that other manufacturing organizations can do intheir own niches on the education front, given what you have learned from yourexperiences doing this and well dating at Lincoln, so I would say avocatnationally and act locally. That's what we need to do. There's programs outthere that can really strengthen the current techno education and educationjust in general, but it also we need manufacturers to get and become part ofthe conversation and part of the solution. If we don't get employersgoing back to the community colleges, the career senners in the high schoolsand acting locally saying, look, I will bring your students in and I'll showwhat our workforce looks like I'll, give them a little taste of it or wedon't go sit on advisory boards and...

...really challenge those schools in a waythat that they can start producing the product that we want to hire. You know,just as a manufacturer produces a product they want to sell to therepublic schools produce a product called a student, then he is a graduateand become gameful employed or go on to continuing education right. So who isguiding that development of that product or that student and the bestcases is going to be the people that are going to hire them themanufacturers? The industries, then, that local area and needs to hire themto be more productive, to bring in the technologies that will make the helpthem double the size of their company to make the acquisitions they want tooperate at a safer level. And so that's why I always say we need to advocate ata high state or national level, get engaged with that, but then act locallybecome part of that solution and become part of that conversation. Because forme, if I'm a manufacturer, I say I can't hire anybody. Nobody wants tocome work for me. I hope Joe I'd hope. You look right me right back in theface and say well: Have you walked over to the school and and talked to them?Have you open your doors and invited those students to come in and see whatyou do and how cool the things that your people get to do every day couldchange their lives and what they could do with it? And if I tell you now, thenthen it's my fault, it's not school's fault, and so I think the conversationgoes both ways. Yeah, I agree. Jason is there anything you want to touch onhere that I didn't ask you about? No, I think when we think about manufacturing,we think about moving forward, we're going to be challenged for many yearsto come and we're going to be challenged on finding a right talent,we're going to be challenged on finding the right population that we can hirein a manufacturing, and I think those alternative populations that we haveout there. We need to get active in that. We need to get and go out thereand do that and you know I'll be I'll, be honest. I'm pretty conservative andI really love that six, a m to ten P M job. I really don't, but you know a lotof, must work that right or we really punch that clock from eight to five andI think, if we're going to tap into...

...these alternative populations, I thinkwe're going to have to look at our work environment, a work schedules. I thinkthat's something else. Ovid is taught us, you know it. Does it really matter?Somebody comes in at eight, a m or nine V. I read a story a long time ago and Ican't tell you the manufacturer's name, but you know they went out to somemothers and MOMS and said why don't you want to come work for it? They said.Well, it's pretty important for me to watch my kid o get on the bus and it'spretty important for me to watch my kid. Oh get off the bus, they said fine.What if we could fix that, what if we could create a work shift for you? Thatwould fix that and you we meet your goals and we can help increase ourproductivity, fine, let's do it and actually they became more productivethan the men in the field and it worked. So I think you know, as I'm prettyconservative and I'm pretty. I like routine, and I, like you, know,thinking old school, but I really do believe and it challenges me too is tothink, alternatively about what does it mean to have a highly engaged, highlyskilled, highly productive workforce, and how am I going to meet their needsmoving forward? What it Covin teach us from this, and and what lessons can wetake? Now it's not going to work for every manufacturer, it's not going towork for every office area, but I do think there's some lessons there and toattract these different populations. I think we're going to have to considerthat I think you brought up a really great point, which is ask the peoplethat you're trying to reach what do they want like what? What would makethis more appealing to them? And I think that's a perfect example of itthat you gave when I was talking, I mentioned, Drew Crow. Who was myinterview recently on the show, and he was talking about it from thestandpoint of what is the young workforce want and the example he usedwas well. They used to get these these coins. I forget what you when you callthem like when they you know when they complete some task, or you know therewas like a reward. They did get these coins and traditionally it wassomething that people really valued as...

...something he took pride in collectingthese coins. That were you know, physical signs of achievement and whathe learned from talking to to young people. This is more than the machiningspace, but is that, like these things are meaningless to them that we need aplace to live? We need housing, like you know, and so his whole concept waswell. Can you offer me some housing to you know people who are the youngworkforce who is coming in at lower salaries and lower pay and address thething that they're actually asking for because that's going to be a lot, a lotmore meaningful to them and it's Goin to help you recruit people, so I don't.I think it's just like the lesson here is: is yet being more flexible,listening to what people actually want, what would make the work place moreappealing to them, and sometimes it's the simple things honestly? Well, it'samazing to I tell schools all the time when they build the other. They talkabout remodeling, the welding program. We got to do this and you know ourfamous saying is just back the dumpster up, because we're going to throw halfof it out and then we're going to we're going to start painting the walls right-and the point is- is that you have to make an environment that students wantto be in. You would rather this you want it so good that the student wantsto be in that welding program more. They want to be in their own, but andso if we can create a work environment where people truly want to be engagedat work, then I think there's a lot of things that we can do with that andattracting that work force into our our manufacturing facilities. And thatmeans painting the walls putting up brighter lights, making sure they cansee making sure that they have the right tools to do their job, makingsure they have the right training. I mean a lot of times. It just comes downto training, there's a person comfortable in doing that doing thatjob, and so there's a lot of value in that. And if we're going to tract thatnext level work force, I think that's where it at and and when I talk aboutengagement, I mean engagement is to me- is just as much that the person havinga hundred percent attendance rate as a person, that's begging, to go, get thatpromotion and aand going and get any...

...more skills and going to get moreeducation, but I'm perfectly happy that somebody also wants to live their lifeoutside of the system and they're doing the job to go, live their life andthat's perfectly fine, absolutely well Jason Awesome Conversation here. Ireally appreciate you doing this today absolutely enjoyed it because, near anddear to my heart, I something we talk about all the time here I can tell Imean I can I can sit sense, the passion in your voice and just watching youtalk about this, so I think it's really great your standing for something thatis just so important right now, really more than ever so love the conversation.Can you tell our audience how they can get in touch with you and also wherethey can learn more about what Lincoln electrics doing, and particularly onthe Education Front? Absolutely so we c be found at Lincoln Electric on theWorld Wide Web, and then I can be reached at Jason, underscore scales atLincoln. Electric Com, beautiful, well, Jason. Thanks, again appreciate yourtime, absolutely Joe, my pleasure to be a part of the podcast. Thank youawesome and, as for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episodeof the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools, specificallyfor B to B manufacturers at grilla. Seventy SICOT Aswan. Thank you so muchto listening until next time. I.

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