The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 5 months ago

The NFL Draft, The NBA Draft and... The Manufacturing Skills Draft? w/ Dr. Jason Scales

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

You’ve probably heard about the infamous skills gap in manufacturing — a problem only made worse by the pandemic.

It has the potential to affect our lives in profound ways; even our national security is at stake.

And if we expect to solve it, we need to get creative — like, say, starting a nationally-televised Skills Draft?

That’s one of the creative solutions today’s guest, Dr. Jason Scales, Business Manager, Education at Lincoln Electric, proposes to avoid the coming skills depression.

In this episode, we discuss:

- Why COVID widened the skills gap

- What a Skills Draft is and why it could change the national culture around high-skilled employment

- What manufacturers should be doing to help today’s youth get excited for —and see a viable future in — the industry

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

All these youth, what they startdoing is they start forming these ideas, I'm going to be that NBA Player, I'm gonna be that NFL player, and they set their sights on thatgoal. Right. Why can't we do the same with skilled trades? Whycan't we bring industry together? Why can't we bring these students together say we'regonna HAVE A skills draft? Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where weexplore the strategies and experiences that are driving midsize manufacturers forward. Here you'll discovernew insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successesand struggles, and you'll learn from B tob sales and marketing experts about howto apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm Joe Sullivan,your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency Gorilla Seventy six.With the first pick of the one thousand nine hundred and ninety four NBA draft, the Milwaukee Bucks Select Glenn Robinson from Purdue University. There's a sound biteI vividly remember from my childhood, growing up as a huge sports fan inWisconsin, and although big dog Glenn Robinson could have been Jason Kidd or GrantHill and that number one spot, he did all right. For us,the NBA a draft may have been second only to Christmas as the best dayof the year. As a kid, we and my best friend Dan Careywould do mock drafts for days leading up to it and we'd set up shopin one of our basements and then we'd watch the whole thing play out startto finish. So why am I telling you this? Because my guest todaywill pose the question for you. Why do we only do this in sports? As we educate and train the next generation of welders, machinists and soon, why not celebrate the launch of their careers, draw attention to theirachievements and skills and make a big deal about it for all these young workers, their parents and the companies who,...

...frankly, need them now more thanever? Let's call it the skills draft. In this episode we're going to talkabout educating the next generation of the manufacturing workforce and how to make theskilled trades more exciting to its future stars. So let's get into it. DrJason Scales is the business manager of Education for Lincoln Electric. He's responsiblefor strategic planning and the management of his company's education team and product portfolio.Dr Scales serves on a number of boards and it's participated in numerous speaking engagements, panels and bylined articles on the subject of the changing face of technical educationand creating paths for addressing the current skills gap and manufacturing and construction. Beforejoining Lincoln Electric, Dr Skills Served on the staff at the University of CentralMissouri as an associate professor of egg your culture. Following a career in agriculturaleducation, he earned his doctor of philosophy in agricultural education at the University ofMissouri. Jason, welcome to the show. Well, thanks for having us,Joe he bat. Well, Jason, let's get right into it. IfI'm not mistaken, I think you told me that Lincoln Electric has thelongest running welding school in the world and I'd love to hear you talk aboutthe history of the program how it's evolved and especially in recent years since you'vebeen there. Absolutely and thanks for having us on today. It's a pleasureto talk about this and and really talk about the skills gap and what's goingon with currentical education and how we're going to address this thing. And youknow, with our us, our journey started in one thousand nine hundred andseventeen and are with our welding school. And interesting was, if you remember, in nineteen seventeen from history, there's a little thing going on called WorldWar One and the US army needed a way to figure out, how canI get and repair equipment that may be damage during the war efforts, getthem back in and so on, and they basically called on Lincoln Electric andsaid, can you help us in training our infantry men or are a groupof soldiers in welding? We think we...

...can use welding the assist us inthe war efforts and everything. And so that's really where we started our weldingschool and it was so successful we just left it running all the way sincethen and we've always been engaged in this notion of welding education because, youknow, as we started and started in the welding industry, we needed toeducate people on that. We needed to bring that to the forefront and reallymake it a viable solution for joining materials. How are you going to build theskyscrapers? How are you going to build the tanks? How are yougoing to build the ships and the boats? Because we may have been riveting atthat time, and so you're transforming that with a new technology of welding. And then, as it's evolved, we use our welding school not onlyto train new welders, but even today it becomes our research and Development Facilityfor how are we going to strengthen welding education both domestically and internationally? Whatnew curricula do we need? What new tools do we need? How weengage dudents in the welding booth, in the classroom? So it really isone of those dynamic things that, as we look at it, it willcontinue to evolve, but is core to our mission here at Lincoln Electric.That's cool. What's change, you know, especially in recent years? I justthink of all the technology that's found its way into, I mean,every facet of our lives and then what happened in the world, you know, to the last sixteen months or so? I'm just curious what's changed and interms of welding education, if anything right. I mean you think welding. Right, you're just welding. What real technology do you need in welding? But do you think about industry? Four, oh, and what we'redoing with data, data acquisition, data controls, computers integrating into welding equipmentto where we can control that welding process to the infinite degree. But whenyou think about education, how do I use virtual assimilation? How do Iuse these technologies in the welding booth? Because we need to develop that welderfaster and I need to develop more proficiencies in that welder. And interesting justhot off the press, we did a...

...study with case date and Wsu techout in Kansas and one of the interesting things when we introduced technology like ourVERTEX simulator into welding education, we not only make a better welder and andable to train them faster, but we found that we actually develop a newlevel of confidence in that individual to where they almost feel like I'm the Supermanand superwoman of welding and and I'm going to go out and get the bestjob I can. And they had such a high placement of those individuals thatwere in that that study with Vertex it was very surprising. Not to meor others in that are close to it, but that level confidence to give thatyoung person, that new person naring the workforce. It was just anincredible thing to see happen. It's really cool. You're, of course,in this welding corner of the manufacturing world, but I've talked to a number ofpeople on this podcast over the last few months that are really hitting this, this topic of skilled labor gap from a number of angles and, youknow, I had Matt Goosey, who is up in Wisconsin and he's helphelping run an organization called Cardinal Manufacturing, which is a essentially a machine shoprun inside the walls of a high school where they've got high school kids thelearning to be machinists as part of their school curriculum, alongside math and science. And Drew Crow or Andrew Crow on recently as well, talking about,you know, getting young people involved and excited about manufacturing and as an,you know, alternative to those who are feel the pressure to go to collegewhen college may not be right for them, or people who are working at,you know, frankly, working at McDonald's and there's opportunities to go,you know, learn how to be a machinist or maybe, in your case, a welder, and think there's just it's becoming very clear to me thatthere is a sort of gap in the way that the opportunities in all cornersof manufacturing are being communicated to really the next generation. So just kind ofcurious to hear your take on that,...

...if you agree, if you're seeingkind of the same thing you know I do. And if you think aboutmanufacturing like we at linkoln electric are manufacturing center is bright, it's well lit, it's clean, we use technology during the manufacturing phase and a lot ofpeople don't realize that. They still have images of the old, dirty,smoky, you know, gringy manufacturing site to where you know they're just sweatingand just trying to crank out parts, and that's just not really what itlooks like anymore today. And the opportunities that are out there, it justis incredible and I told my kids all the time if I knew then whatI know today and I was eighteen, what I be doctor scale sitting inthis chair? I don't know. I really don't know, because the opportunitiesare out there and manufacturing and in the skilled trades and let me think aboutbeing a plumber. The lack of plumbers today is so significant. But youknow, think about what happened over the last eighteen months. We have nowfour academic terms that have been that we're disrupted by Covid so the ability tocertify New People to enter in the workforce. You know when you had all thesepeople laid off and the hospitality industry went down, and now you haveall these different income a workers and they're they're trying to get back in theworkplace but they may not have the right skills to get a manufacturing so it'salmost like we have not only do we have a skills gap, we havea mismatch of skills because the income at workforce may have had a different lineof work. Now they have to shift to get into a another new lineof work right and so it's going to be up to us to figure outhow do we fast track short term credentials or get those stackable credentials, certificates, whatever we need to do to get those people cross train, to getthem employable faster. And you know that skills gap that we talked about fiveyears ago and people really couldn't point to it. They couldn't say this iswhy this is going on, we think, for not motivating kids to get init. COVID is a tangible point that we can now point to saywe got we truly have a skills get. We truly have a challenge in frontof us and we've got to figure...

...out how to get this thing,how to get US solved. Yeah, for sure. I mean it's forall the kind of just shed lighted, sort of amplified. You know,the issue, put light on it, gave you something tangible to point to, right it. But it's so pervasive today. We work with a programcalled project manufacturing. It's actually sponsored by the Department of Defense, and thereason there's sponsoring this it's almost that the lack of skilled workforce is almost anational security risk. And so you know, the Department of Defense is funding thisproject and link in electric and hosts manufacturing. See and see your partof this. And we put on these contests all around the United States totry and promote these trades to youth, to make it more exciting, becauseyou know, who's going to build the ships tomorrow? If I don't havewelder's who's going to build the aircraft? More if I don't have well beat a drone or a human flight type aircraft. You know, those thingsare tangible and we need there's a lot of people interest in this. WithNay of Nasal Association of manufacturers. We were just on the phone with themyesterday's highly interesting in how are we going to get not only today's work force, but what about the alternative workforce? So what about attracting women into manufacturingand really bringing them into the fold of manufacturing? What are we going todo with incarcerated people that we're getting rehabilitated that now can be active in theworkforce, actually have a meaningful life and get a substance of living and andnot worried about not going back to their old ways? How do we lookat these different areas of the workforce we may not have looked for in thepast, but really get them involved, get them skilled up and make thema part of the solution that's going to bring us forward to solve this thisgap that we have of that talent pipeline. Yeah, you bring up a reallyinteresting point that you know, we need to look in different places right. It's not not the traditional places where maybe we've been looking for labor.I mean you named a few, few of them, and I think that'sthat mindset shift and thinking creatively about how...

...do we reach different audiences that couldbe a part of this workforce is going to be really important. Absolutely.I mean, you know, we're engaged all over the board. WE'RE ENGAGEDWITH FA we're engaged with skills, with say, we're engaged with many ofthe job cord around the United States, we're engaged with many community colleges.But you know, American Welling Society says we need three hundred thousand welders,by two thousand and twenty five to fill this gap that we have. Right. Is it really possible for public education to produce three hundred thousand welders tofill the needs by two thousand and twenty five? I would argue probably not. So where's that extra workforce going to come from? And it's going tocome from all these alternative populations that we need a skill up and train.And that Skilling up and training is going to look different and I think you'regoing to start to see manufacturers really teaming up with the education agencies in theirregion at Community College, a career in text center, high school, privatewhatever. But you know, it's not only going to be public education that'sa part of the solution. Manufacturers and people that need that workforce are alsogoing to become part of that solution where they may have training in their owninstitution. They they may take a trained welder take on the rest of theway to make them theirs. They may need an electrician or maintenance person thatcan maintain all types of different equipment, plumbers. I think you're just goingto start to see a shift where there's going to be some ownership on theemployer's side and they're still going to be that education piece on the other side, and that may be done through apprenticeship programs, workforce development, all thesedifferent things, but I think we just got to start thinking outside the boxand really looking in different areas and trying to find these little solutions. Yeah, well said, Jason. I've had a number of guests on this showcome from the land of robotics and AI and automation industry for Point No,from, you know, all different angles. One guest I'm just sort of thinkingof right now, this is a recent episode, was Andy Lawnsbury's thepresident of a company that's based in Columbus...

Ohio, called path robotics. Thereare super impressive autonomous welding robotics company, and so his companies attacking the skillsgap from the standpoint of putting robots into places where traditionally humans have done thework because, frankly, their customers are finding that they can find the Laborright and I'm just kind of curious from your angle, like, what doyou think the future of welding looks like in terms of human versus robot implementationor whatever word I should be using their right. I guess it kind ofgoes back to you remember when Excel came out, when Microsoft Excel came outof a while back, we thought, well, all the accounts are done, now we have excel, so accounting's done. Well, accounting didn't goaway and excel didn't expire out the accountants. What happened was extel became a toolto use, a new skill set was born and an accountant may looka little different right. So I don't I don't think robots or automations reallygoing to displace workers. I think it may change the landscape of the workforce. I think skills may shift. But if you think about welding. Automationmakes sense when it's a highly repetitive multipiece. I need to do it over andover and over and over again that it makes sense. But that maybe in the automotive space and in manufacturing. That maybe where I'm building, youknow, Poles to hold down telephone poles and I got a weld ona spiral jig onto this and it's highly repetitive. An automation makes a lotof sense, but it didn't displace that welder. That welder still has tooperate that cell. The welder still has to do different things, a monitorthose situations. So the skill set change and you know that myth of thatif we if we automate, we're displacing workers. We're not displacing workers.Were shifting the skills needed in the work worse of that time. And alot of these industries like welding, you may see robotics or automation come intoone sector of it, but there are...

...so many industry segments in welding thatwe're always going to need that skilled welder that can really go in, dialit in and weld with their hands and make that product and make it happenthat's not going to go away, and so I don't see that automations athreat. Actually I think it's a very good thing and it's just going toenhance the skills or we're gonna have to kind of mend a little bit.But I really find it a pose. Yeah, goold take. I thinkI'm hearing mostly the same as far as automations concerned, and it's funny it'slike this. I think there's a perception among the general public that wrote therobots are going to take our jobs and, as we all know, right nowit's we need somebody to fill the jobs and if anything, robotics ishelping the situation. But yeah, I was kind of curious to get yourtake on it. Yeah, you know, you introduced when we talked week ortwo ago and preparation for this conversation you're interested really interesting idea, whichwas the skills draft, and rather than me trying to explain what I thinkyou had in mind, they're going to let you put on the Mel KuyperHat, you know, on PN and talk about what what's the skills draft? But in the context of manufacturing or welding specifically, I got to becare circle because somebody, somebody's going to take me up on this and saywe're going to we're going to make this happen scales. Let's go make anAPP. Yeah, well, hopefully they do all right. But in essence, you know, we part of with a group called National Coalition of CertificationCenters, and there's other groups that do similar things like this, and ncthreereally institute. Is something called a national signing day. So when high schoolstudents go to college and they play sports for college, there's usually a signingday at that high school where the students signing a letter intent. It's abig celebration. The student gets A, you know, a scholarship. They'regoing to go play football, Lacrosse or basketball and you're going to get financialassistance to go do that at that institution. It's going to help them get aleg up on their education. It's can be a great thing, right. So that's all wrapped around sports.

Well, the concept is, whydon't we do that around the skilled trades? So now here's somebody actually signing aletter intent. Their mom and dad are there, the grandma and GRANDPA'sor families there. They put a ball cap on on, they take apicture. They have somebody announcing this thing over the Internet. It's streaming live. Family members can watch it and it's so powerful that when a school putsthem on, they may think, well, we'll have seventy five people show up. I had one school that had to double the diesel program because somany people showed over that national signing day. It was over four hundred individual scienceshowed up for that day. Now this is being streamed over the Internet. Everybody's there. You guys, speakers are calling out their name. Hey, Joe Soliman, just sign that letter evnted. He's going to this communitycollege, he's going to get that degree in computer aided drafting, he's goingto be a champion out there in the field and by Golly, thank youjoe for coming today. And they're taking pictures and you know, it's abig thing, right. What we do that in sports we had these signingdays and sports we make a big thing out of it. Well, thenwe have this huge draft at the end of the school year. We callthe NFL draft, the NBA draft and so on, and we celebrate thetop athletes that are going on to professional athletics and they're going to be inthe NBA of the NFL. We don't really talk about the dollars are goingto make. Me All assume what they're going to make. But we celebratethat. And and there's, you know, millions of people watching this on TV. And so all these youth what they start doing is they start formingthese ideas, I'm going to be that NBA player, I'm going to bethat NFL player, and they set their sights on that goal. Right.Why can't we do the same with skilled trades? Why can't we bring industrytogether? Why can't we bring these students together and say we're going to havea skills draft and here we got all these students. They're going to applyand they're going to interview there the best of the best. Right, andhow awesome would it be that now we're announcing out there the skills draft andhere's company a and they're going to pay thirtyzero dollars to get the number onedraft pick for the welder. They value...

...this person so much they're going topay a thirtyzero for the number one draft pick. All Moneys go back tothe program from which the student comes, and that's how we're going to getpeople excited about skills. That's how we're going to get people excited about skilledtrades. Wouldn't you like to be the family member of the MOM and dadthat your son or daughter just got picked for the number one draft? Idon't care if the computer at a drafting, nursing, occupational therapy, welding buildingtraits what it is, but if we really want to excite the publicand really bring some momentum to what we can do with getting skilled trades going, we've got to make it exciting, we've got to make it relevant andwe've got to get people to understand that these are true jobs that are verywell paying jobs. Their high wage, high skill, and let's reward thesepeople for being the top, and I think it'd be a cool thing tohappen. That's one of the coolest ideas I've heard a long time, honestly, and it's one of my favorite things I've heard some we talked about onthis show. I can't wait to get some more eyeballs on on this ears, I should say I guess on on this concept, because I hope somebodydoes take you up on I think it's so cool. I just think aboutall you know I'm a creative guy. Come from a run a marketing agency. I came from a design background before I did this, and I'm thinkingof like how you could make a production out of this and make it somethingreally special. That would it would be fun, it would be meaningful tothe kids, to the parents, to the organizations and do so much prideinvolved in it. So love it. Well, I mean we here thiswelding school. We've never really had a graduation for our comprehensive program. Fouryears ago I said, look, we need to have a graduation. It'sa sixteen week program, but we need to have a graduation. And youknow how much pride that these parents, husband's, wives, kids take forsomebody committing to a program, finishing the program and being a recognized for that. Ever, and you don't realize that what that really is until you havea commencement and and you witness it. I mean we've all been to highschool graduations. We've all been to college...

...graduate not maybe not all, butbut for for a family member that it could be the first time. Soone of the so many of their family graduated from something after High School.They're the first generation and they know they're going to go on to success andgo get a better job and they're going to make their lives better and they'regoing to move on. That's a great thing. And if we don't startcelebrating this across the board and recognizing this with our people, what's the motivationfor them to go do it? It's yeah, they always have the intrinsicmotivation, but Mayn we can make it a whole lot better if we justdid some small things. I think it's so smart. And just for therecord, I was teered up when my daughter had her kindergarten graduation about twomonths ago. So, yeah, where that tear in your eye because youknow it's about her to be over so you can be eighteen tomorrow. No, kidding, right, Oh man, no, it's such a great concept. I think it's it's so cool. So I love that we're putting thisidea out there and I hope it spurs some ideas for people who are listening. Right. So, Jason, during the well holding corner of manufacturing,like what is speaking more generally, what do you think that manufacturing organizations,whether they're in some whether the fabricators, whether they're, you know, machinebuilders or whatever? It is, what do you think that other manufacturing organizationscan do in their own niches on the education front, given what you've learnedfrom your experiences doing this in welding at Lincoln? So I would say advocatenationally and act locally. That's what we need to do. There's programs outthere that can really strengthen the creer technical education and education just in general.But it also we need manufacturers to get and become part of the conversation andpart of the solution. If we don't get employers going back to the communitycolleges, the career centers on the high schools and acting locally, saying look, I will bring your students in and I'll show them what our workforce lookslike, I'll give them a little taste of it, or we don't gosit on advisory boards and really challenge those...

...schools in a way that they canstart producing the product that we want to hire. You know, just asa manufacturer produce as a product they want to sell to the public schools producea product called a student. Then he's a graduate and become gainfully employed orgo on to continue education. Right. So who is guiding that development ofthat product or that student and the best cases is going to be the people. They're going to hire them, the manufacturers, the industries. Then thatlocal area and needs to higher them to be more productive, to bring inthe technologies that will make the help them double the size of their company,to make the acquisitions they want to operate at a safer level. And sothat's why I always say we need to advocate at a high state or nationallevel, get engaged with that, but then act locally, become part ofthat solution and become part of that conversation, because for me, if I'm amanufacturer, I say I can't hire anybody. Nobody wants to come workfor me. I hope, Joe, I hope you look right me,right back in the face and say, well, have you walked over tothe school and and talk to them? Have you an open your doors andinvited those students to come in and see what you do and how cool thethings that though your people get to do every day could change their lives andwhat they could do with it? And if I tell you know, thenit's my fault, it's not school's fault. And so I think the conversation goesboth ways. Yeah, I agree, Jason. Is there anything you wantto touch on here that I didn't ask you about? No, Ithink when we think about manufacturing, we think about moving forward, we're goingto be challenged for many years to come. Now we're going to be challenged onfinding the right talent. We're going to be challenged on finding the rightpopulation that we can hire in a manufacturing and I think those alternative populations thatwe have out there we need to get active in that. We need toget and go out there and do that. And you know, I'll be I'llbe honest. I'm pretty conservative and I really love that six am toten PM job. I really don't. But you know, a lot ofa lot of Mus work that right. or we really punch that clock fromeight hundred and twenty five. And I...

...think if we're going to tap intothese alternative populations, I think we're going to have to look at our workenvironmental work schedules. I think that's something else covid has taught us. Youknow it, does it really matter somebody comes in at zero am or nineam? I'm I read a story a long time ago and I can't tellyou the manufacturer's name but you know, they went out to some mothers andmom's and said, why don't you want to come work for me? Theysaid, well, it's pretty important for me to watch my Kiddo get onthe bus and it's pretty important for me to watch my Kiddo get off thebus. They said, fine, what if we could fix that? Whatif we could create a work shift for you? That would fix that andyou we meet your goals and we can help increase our productivity. Fine,let's do it. And actually they became more productive than the men in thefield and it worked. So I think, you know, as I'm pretty conservativeand I'm pretty I like routine and I like, you know, thinkingold school, but I really do believe, and it challenges me to is tothink alternatively about what does it mean to have a highly engaged, highlyskilled, highly productive workforce and how am I going to meet their needs movingforward? What did covid teach us from this and and what lessons can wetake? Not It's not going to work for every manufacturer's not going to workfor every office area, but I do think there's some lessons there and toattract these different populations, I think we're going to have to consider that.Well, I think you brought up a really great point, which is askedthe people that you're trying to reach. What do they want like? Whatwhat would make this more appealing to them? And I think that's a perfect exampleof it that you gave one. When I was talking, I mentioneddrew crow, who was my interviewee recently on this show, and he wastalking about it from the standpoint of what is the young workforce want, andthe example he used was, well, they used to get these these coins, i. Forgere what you hear, what you call them, like whenthey you know, when they complete some task or you know, it waslike a reward. They did get these coins and traditionally it was something thatthe people really valued. Is something they...

...took pride and collecting these coins thatwere, you know, physical signs of achievement. And what he learned fromtalking to young people this is more in the machining space, but is thatlike these things are meaningless to them, that we need a place to live, we need housing, like you know, and so his whole concept was,well, can you offer some some housing to, you know, peoplewho are the young workforce who is coming in at lower salaries and or lowerpay and address the thing that they're actually asking for, because that's gonna bea lot, a lot more meaningful to them and it's going to help yourecruit people. So I don't I think it's just like the lesson here isis yet being more flexible, listening to what people actually want, what wouldmake the workplace more appealing to them, and sometimes it's the simple things,honestly. Well, it's amazing too. I tell schools all the time whenthey build there, you know, they talked about remodeling the welding program wegot to do this and you know, while our famous saying is just backthe dumpster up, because we're going to throw half of it out, thenwe're going to we're going to start paint the walls right. And the pointis is that you have to make an environment that students want to be in. You would rather that this you wanted so good that the student wants tobe in that welding program more than want to be in their own bit.And so if we can create a work environment where people truly want to beengaged at work, then I think there's a lot of things that we cando with that and attracting that workforce into our our manufacturing facilities, and thatmeans painting the walls, putting up brighter lights, making sure they can see, making sure that they have the right tools to do their job, makingsure they have the right training. I mean a lot of times just comesdown to training as a person comfortable in doing that, doing that job,and so there's a lot of value in that and if we're going to tractthat next level workforce, I think that's where it at. And and whenI talk about engagement, I mean engagement is, to me, is justas much the person having a hundred percent attendance rate as a person that's beggingto go get that promotion a and going and getting more skills and going toget more education. But I'm perfectly happy...

...that somebody also wants to live theirlife outside of the system and they're doing the job to go live their lifeand that's perfectly fine. Absolutely well, Jason, awesome conversation here. Ireally appreciate you doing this today. Absolutely enjoyed it is near and dear tomy heart. I so then we talked about all the time here. Oh, I can tell, I mean, I can I can see sense thepassion in your voice and just watching you talk about this. So I thinkit's really great your standard for something that is just so important right now,really more than ever. So love the conversation. Can you tell our audiencehow they can get in touch with you and also where they can learn moreabout what link in electrics doing, and particularly on the Education Front? Absolutelyso. We can be found at Lincoln electriccom on the World Wide Web andthen I can be reached at Jason Underscore scales at Lincoln electriccom. Beautiful.Well, Jason. Thanks again. Appreciate your time. Absolutely Joe. Mypleasure to be a part of the PODCAST. Thank you. Awesome and as forthe rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episodeof the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to the manufacturing executive podcast. Toensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favoritepodcast player. If you'd like to learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and toolsspecifically for bdb manufacturers at gorilla seventy sixcom learn. Thank you so much forlistening. Until next time,.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (83)