The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 1 year ago

Thinking like a Marketer: Reframing the Sales Mindset w/ Chris Luecke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Manufacturers love trade shows. But for a year, we've had to do without them. Plus, shows may never come back the way they once were. How can manufacturers create content, build relationships, and generate leads without shows?

In today's episode, I talk with Chris Luecke, podcast host and community builder at Manufacturing Happy Hour. Chris offers a full plate of both strategic advice and down-and-dirty tactics about how sales-focused organizations can think more like marketers.

Here's what we discussed:

  1. Why videos and podcasts are great ways for manufacturers to build relationships
  2. How sales professionals can improve results with micro marketing
  3. Ways manufacturers can leverage LinkedIn in a meaningful and impactful way


To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

Think about ways of getting quick, timely content out. That really helps the people you're trying to serve, because you're just trying to get the conversation started. Once that relationship starts buttting, then you can talk about products and services and things like that and how you can help. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving midsize manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B tob sales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm Joe Sullivan, your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency guerrilla seventy six. I'm excited about this conversation today because my guest is another pro from the industrial marketing world. But whereas I came up through marketing and CO built my agency around the manufacturing sector, my guest is someone who came up through manufacturing and has done a dang good job figuring out marketing, and he's got a full plate of both strategic advice and down and dirty tactics to share about how sales focused organizations can think more like marketers. So let me take a moment to introduce Chris Lukey. Chris lukey is a podcaster, marketer and self proclaimed medium maverick in the manufacturing industry. As the host of the PODCAST and video series manufacturing happy hour, Chris Interviews leaders in the industrial sector to simplify and explore the latest trends and technologies impacting modern manufacturers. Chris recently left his sales job of eleven years with Rockwell automation to pursue podcasting and marketing full time. He now helps manufacturers, their marketing leaders and their sales people create lead generating digital content build dedicated customer communities. Chris, welcome to the show. Joe, it's good to be here, glad to be on your show. You've been doing a great job with us and it's an honor to be here. Well, I'm just following your lead. Man, you're like one of the pioneers that the podcasting world in manufacturing. So love what you've been doing. That's how I found you in the first place, and then we you know, we struck up conversation a while back. I got to be a guest on your show and but yeah, so thanks for the inspiration along the way. Absolutely. Man. Hey, you're one of the best around when it comes to industrial marketing, so I'm always borrowing tips from you as well. Awesome, I appreciate that. So, Chris, the dynamic between you and me is kind of funny. It's you. You, you are a St Louis born and raised industrial marketing guy living in Milwaukee now. I, on the other hand, am a Milwaukee born and raised industrial marketing guy living in St Louis. You came to Milwaukee years back to do under at at Marquette University. I went to market university high school a few blocks down the road from there, and now we both host podcast for manufacturing people.

So it's it's kind of a little bit eerie, though, sort of like reverse path we've taken and then yet we've wound up in this in the same world. So anyway, this is this is going to be fun. Yeah, now it's the one. I'd say one thing we do have in common right now is it's freezing cold in both of our respective areas that it is and I was used to that weather when, you know, living in Milwaukee. Of course it's I mean, for context here, like we're recording this in in mid February and it's February fifteen and it is, I think, currently zero degrees, or maybe one degree right now in St Louis, which is and there's snow just dumping on us, which we don't get a ton of, but used to it where you are. But even there, I mean that's pretty pretty darn cold. So yeah, yeah, for me it's getting used to it after moving back from California, but it's good to be back at Midwest good. Well, we're good to have you back in the Midwest. Are Glad to have you back in the Midwest. So awesome. Well, let's get into it here, you know, before we really dive into the conversation, though, Chris, I'd love for you to just tell our listeners a little bit about your background at Rockwell automation and sort of what led you to where you are today and what you're doing now. Yeah, so good question. So I started with Rockwell right out of college, so it's been, you know, had an eleven year career with them. They set me up for a lot of success. Really enjoyed my time working in the Houston Texas as well as the San Francisco market. I basically split my time between those two and and you know, while I was there it was a sales guy the whole time, individual contributor, and what I'm doing now I'm really focusing on helping industrial companies kind of get the blocking and tackling right when it comes to sales and marketing strategies, and I really approach it from a sales standpoint. Provide context on what I do. When I moved from Houston Texas to San Francisco, I was calling on a much older generation. When I was in Houston, you know, people that had been working at their companies for twenty, thirty years. They valued, you know, you showing up for the facetoface meeting, they valued the handshake, they've valued the relationship. Then when I moved to the bay area, all of a sudden I was in a market with, you know, twenty and thirty something your olds making all the decisions and they were consuming content and building relationships differently. So I started adopting a lot of what I would say marketing tactics into my sales strategy about four years ago when I needed a new way to penetrate and break more into my market. So I started doing videos, started doing podcasts and ultimately that led me to realize, Gosh, that's a great way for industrial companies, whether it's their marketing teams or their individual contributors, to create content, build relationships and ultimately drive awareness around what they do in an authentic way. So, you know, it was really my experience as a salesperson that led me to what I'm doing today, where I'm really helping companies get the blocking and tackling around their mark getting correct. I think it's great. I mean I've been working with manufacturers for you know, our agencies existed for fourteen years and it's been probably about eight or nine years of working specifically...

...with manufacturers, and I tell you, there is, I can confirm there is a need for for what you are doing here. So you've come to the right place. It's good. So something you and I have talked about, Chris, and I think that what you just Sais a good lead into this. But a common observation I think that we've had is that the manufacturing sector is largely legging behind in terms of its marketing skill set. And you know, you've got these great organizations, big and small, many of your family owned second or third generation operations, and they've built amazing successful businesses, but on the backs of repeat customers and referrals and, in a lot of cases, really strong sales teams. They understand how to sell in a consultative way, or a lot of the best people do, I think, through, you know, often long and complex buying processes to committees of buyers. But when it comes to marketing they kind of default to what I call First Person Pronoun Marketing, where it's just all I me, my we us are, or in other words are talking about themselves, and their default medium for shooting or for shouting that message is largely trade shows and print ads and brochures. Website, that's just a digital brochure. But something I've heard you talk about is, you know, and it really struck a chord with me as this idea that marketing or that manufacturing a sales professionals need to start thinking like marketers. So I'm going to I'm going to stop there and just ask you what do you mean by that when you kind of got into it, like creating videos and embracing technology. But when you when when you talk about sales people thinking like marketers in the industrial sector, like, what does that mean? Great Question. I'd say the easiest way to think about it is the salespeople need to start thinking about them sales as their own marketing department. We're doing micro marketing, as a term I'll just throw out there where I talked about I was creating videos for my customers. You know, let's think about some of the mediums that marketing departments are using. They're getting targeted on social media, they're using news letters, they're using email marketing. There's no reason that a salesperson or an account manager shouldn't be adopting those same type of habits if, at the end of the day, the goal is the same. You're trying to build new relationships and ultimately create conversions bring in new customers. There's no reason that sales people shouldn't be looking at the marketing department and saying, you know what, if I did that on a small scale with my account base, I can probably accelerate the growth of my customers or my account package, or I could bring in my next customer by finding them on Linkedin. What I always I think of it in terms of really, since I've been a sales guy the whole time, I think of marketing purely in terms of a sales standpoint. If I'm a sales guy, I just need to block off time to prospect on Linkedin or write that newsletter. At the same way I would block off time for a call with a customer. So that that's my first answer to that. I think we're going to get into some of these elements a little bit more, but really just think in micro marketing is what I would say. Yeah, I think that's a great point.

It seems like sales professionals have a tendency to jump into selling too fast and there's there's you know, and it's tough when you've got sales goals to reach for this month of this quarter this year. But you know, the reality is for a lot of companies there's there's a process there and it takes time to develop these leads and I think that's what what good marketers are really good at doing is you're looking at like there's a performance based marketing element to what you're doing, where you're you know you are trying to help your sales team reach these specific goals in the short term. But a lot of marketing is it's really lead development. It's building awareness, establishing thought leadership, becoming a trusted source of information and making sure that the right people are seeing you on a consistent basis. And I think that the best sales people out there can, probably a lot of them can probably do it very well. They're just not doing it. HMM, no doubt. Well, I think the one strength that good salesperson brings to a marketing roles they're usually predisciplined. They've got to be going in their funnel to update their funnel, they've got to be making ten, fifteen hour many calls a week. You've got to have some discipline process to get to get that in place. So how hard is it to say, okay, for these two hours I'm going to write my monthly newsletter to my customers, or for this hour each morning this week I'm going to spend some time on linkedin providing value, posting good content but also, let's say, responding to some of my customers that have engaged with my content for some of my partners as well, it's really making it it's getting in a habit. That's what it is like. The same habits you'd have for funnel discipline or make in sales calls are leading someone through that buying process of salesperson. Take some of those marketing tactics and do the same thing with those. Yeah, great way to look at it. So let's talk about linked in a little bit more, because you and I are both pretty active on Linkedin. We both know how powerful it is, not just because people tell us that it is, but because we've seen the impact. But I think that most sales professionals who haven't really immersed theirselves in the platform are kind of missing the boat. They're jumping in there. They're connecting with as many people as I can and when people accept their connect requests, it's immediately throw sales pitch at them and then of course you're going to get ignored. You don't act that way in real life, so I would you act that way online. But but I guess tell me the value you see in the tool and and how you think Linkedin can be best leveraged in a meaningful and impactful way. Gosh, there are. There are a number of different ways. I'm going to start with the most basics in terms of how to leverage it. You met you and you mentioned it right at the start. There's a lot of I II self proclaiming pronouns. Flip that and make it about you. You you on Linkedin, whether you're reaching out to someone, whether you're talking talking about your solution. Really put it in the perspective of how does this help someone else, or how can I potentially serve someone else, or how do I connect with someone else? As a very base starting point, I...

...would just connect with your existing customers and use it as a way to nurture them, because we always think of I shouldn't say always, but a lot of us think in sales in terms of pulling in the next customer. Well, the end of the day, it's always easier to grow your relationship and grow your share with an existing customer. So a very basic step, one that I always forget to mention, is connect with those that you're already serving right out of the gate, especially if someone hasn't used linkedin. Now, if if I'm someone that is more savvy with it, understand the plant platform, understand how to make connections with Linkedin a bit better. If you're using it as a way to cold connect with individuals. They're a couple ways you can do it. The most basic thing is if you're reaching out to someone, don't do it from a standpoint of hey, you know, I saw that we have a couple common connection requests. I hope we connect. Don't do something generic like that. Certainly don't do what you were saying, like going in with a sales pitch, saying hey, we have this new product, or we serve companies just like you. Would you like to have a conversation today? We all know that that's not how the sales process works, so why would anyone think that's how it would work on social media? A much better way, I would say, is let's say you see one of your top prospects or one of your customers post something great. Use that as you're in to connect with them and say, Hey, I love that machine you just shared. I've it. Looks like it solves x problem for someone in the packaging industry. Use that as your and talk about them. People want to hear about them. I'm going to be much more likely to accept that connection request than someone that's pitching themselves straight from the GECKO. Yeah, absolutely, I mean, you know, you kind of said it like. People care about themselves, they care about their problems, the things they are trying to accomplish, and maybe they will care about you at some point, right, but not until you've sort of demonstrated that you, you, you know, can create some kind of value for them, or at least that you're there for a genuine relationship, not to try to just sell them something. Right, like people see through that. I'm really saying this from a standpoint of if you are someone that, let's say, someone's running the marketing organization, talk about these lessons with your sales people as well. Make sure that they understand this, because where where I'd hate someone to get held up is thinking. It's like hey, these are basic concepts, but for a lot of people this might be the first time they're hearing about it. So if you are the person in your organization that's listening to this, that knows these things, try to find ways to distribute that information as well. Yeah, great point. I like that a lot. And there's for those of you sales people out there who are listening, there's a phenomenal sales consultant that I follow on Linkedin, Chris I don't know if you know him. Choose names, Josh Braun, Bra UN. Go follow them if you haven't. But so I don't know that anybody is giving better advice right now about how to make a actual human connection with somebody through cold outreach and, you know, be able to genuinely establish rapport with prospects than the Josh's Sidebar here. And by the way, he's not paying me to say this is is just I talked about his stuff because he's message is just really resonates. But he's got this this guide called the Badass be to be growth guide. Really great...

...stuff. But one of the concepts that Josh talks about all the time is this idea of making deposits before taking withdrawals. And it's just all about how can you create value for somebody and when you start to do that consistently by posting insights, by you know, trying to help people solve their problems. This happens in real life, it happens in social media too, but that's how you can start to earn people's trust and attention and then it's a lot easier to make the small asked, to ask for that fifteen minute phone call or whatever, because you're not. You're not leading by with with the me, me, me. I want to add kind of an advanced linkedin tactic on top of this for the sales people as well, because we've talked about the cold outreach, you know, prospecting on there. I would say a first step for most sales people that, as you're getting into Linkedin, get linkedin sales navigator as a tool. I know we're getting more really specific here, but we're we're talking about having context for making these introductions. That's a great way a follow the top companies you're going after, follow the top people you're trying to build connections with and get notified when they're doing something on that platform, because then it's not just it's not a cold outreach anymore. You're seeing when someone is sharing content, you're seeing when a particular trend is important to someone because they're posting about it. You're getting insight into the things that they care about and you can make an introduction at that point, a warm introduction, by catering to the exact things that they're interested in. Now I actually like that you're going down that rabbit hole a little bit because I think it's some really good tactical advice, because I you know, a lot of times I've heard manufacturing people say, well, you know, would like you know, our vp of sales got sales navigator. You know, we're we're thinking about trying it out for some of our people, but I don't really know what you know what to do with it, and I think that's a really good use for a tool like that is build that sort of listening list where your your job is to say, well, who is? A lot of companies have a target list like these are the you know these, these would be fifty great companies we want, we want to connect with or we could do business with or if you don't, well, you should do that. But this gives you the opportunity to flag all these companies and the appropriate individuals at those companies who you want to be your audience and then, like Chris said, you can get alerts when those specific, specific people post something. So your job when you go into the platform is you're going to look at that list and see how we know what people are posting, what they're talking about. It gives you a chance to jump in and and engage in conversation with them and once you've done that five or ten times. Well, now they've seen you, they know who you are. You've hopefully created value and added to the conversation they're already having. And and you know it's Chris said, it's a warm intro now, not just you know who's this guy, Chris or Joe or whoever that's. That's, you know, trying to sell me something out of nowhere right. Well, even thinking of it from the mind of a salesperson again, like the technology aside, linkedin aside,...

...imagine if someone you know ten fifteen years ago said I'm going to give you visibility to the top fifty, top one hundred, top two hundred people, you'd want to work with whenever they're going to talk about the things that are important to them. So you can your timing can be perfect, like if someone said that magic existed that number of years ago, you jump on it right away. The other thing is huge. We talked about at the start. Sales people have quote as they have to hit their numbers this month as well. I never want to encourage someone going into Linkedin with that like Oh, I'm going to convert someone really quickly. But when the first thing you do is you create that listening list as you described, they're probably going to be people you can form accelerated relationships with just because there's so much context there and you can do it in a way that's not irritating, do it in a way that really caters to the things that are important to them when they're important to them. There you go. Anything else you'd add about Linkedin, Chris, before we kind of bounce to the next thing? Gosh, I feel like we've covered some good basics and some good advanced strategies. I mean, I think the biggest thing is is getting in the habit, like for the salespeople out there, even the marketers, like block off the time to post something worthwhile and respond to people that, assuming that you've been doing this on a regular basis or start doing it on a regular basis. Keep those conversations going. Like when I think of content that I post to Linkedin, there two categories that are always good. Something that addresses a current challenge in the market that you can solve, not saying hey, our product solves this problem, but bringing up the conversation, starting that conversation, so educating people on what's going on in the market and some of the things you're hearing around it. That's one. The other thing is celebrate your customers. Man, we talked about prospects and we talked about existing customers, whether it's someone your courting or whether it's a customer that you've been with a while. If you see them post something that they're excited about, reshare that at the very least comment on it and things like that. Like I always find, celebrating your customers, or the people that you'd like to be your customers, is one of the best strategies to get people look in your way. On linkedin, yeah, I absolutely can't disagree with that. And to your first point there, you know, linkedin' is a great place for you to just have a voice and have an opinion. I think they're probably plenty of listeners here who have at some point, either been a speaker at an event or written and editorial article in a Manufacturing Trade Journal. It's kind of a micro version of all that. They're there are things going on that your audience cares about, those problems they're trying to solve and you know how to solve them or you have an opinion on how to do it. Maybe there's current events that that you know you can offer a perspective on. It's a it's a great platform for doing that and starting those conversations and inviting others into those conversations, and then people start commenting and your post gets more visibility because linkedin's algorithm plays to that. It wants to show content to people or to people that are that is going to be engaging, and so everything sort of starts to snowball then...

...and before you know it you've got a following and you're having conversations with the right people. So they take some patients, to take some work, but I think you have to go out there and be authentic. You need to have an opinion about things. Don't focus on you. Focus, like Chris said, on the audience and the things that they care about, and good things are going to come from it. So excellent, sum Riccio couldn't have said it better. Awesome. Well, okay, let's go in another direction here for a second. One thing that's undeniable about manufacturers from my time working with them is that they love their trade shows, and rightly so. I have, I have a lot of clients who rely on them from year to year to they generate good leads, they can trace that to revenue, and so when that's happening, great, you know, I can't I can't argue against it. I think trade show strategy in general needs a lot of work for a lot of companies, but it's a part of the mix. And then, you know, here we are in q one of two thousand and twenty one and it's been almost a year now without trade shows and probably at least another couple of quarters for for most. And so I'm just kind of curious what you're thinking about all this, Chris, and and how you're advising manufacturers right now, who are the especially companies are still kind of reeling without these shows that have been ingrained in their business of strategy forever. Yeah, it's first of all, you're totally right, like manufactures love trade shows. It's been kind of the default. In fact, I think, and I know you work with a lot of people in this regard, getting people to think as marketing more than just events, because that's always been the default. Right. It's like, oh well, marketing is our big trade shown is these three industry ones we go to every year. The reality is it's all about creating awareness it's all about generating leads. It's all about nurturing those relationships. So what are the ways that you can do that as a marketing organization? I think right now, more than ever, it's important for sales and marketing to work together, and I'm also saying this from the mindset of someone that just left a large company and started working with smaller organizations, because there's a lot that those organizations can borrow from one another. So one thing, I'll give a very specific example. One thing I'm doing with one of my clients right now were will record zoom calls every once in a while. We'll just get them recorded where we'll talk about some of the biggest issues, some of the biggest questions that their customers have and will just riff about it for like sixteen minutes. Talk about, Hey, what are the three biggest ways people can solve this problem, or what are the three biggest issues someone's experiencing when it comes to purchasing capital equipment? Will film that. You know it'll be like what, eighteen, twenty minutes long, and it's not the cleanest video in the world, but when it's done we can chop that up into a bunch of different little content that we can share out there that you can format into like a quick two minute video that addresses a hot topic that their customers are facing right now. You do that enough times, you can turn that stuff. You talk about a guerrilla seventy six turn that video into a big blog post, into a piece of pillar content, or, heck,...

...if you already have those blog posts, use that as your guide for the conversation. Start creating micro content like that that you can use to get that message out there in a human fashion. I think that's one of the biggest kickers about it because, yeah, people are using linkedin a bit more right now. Undoubtedly, people have started to adopt that and, I should say other social media in general. But what this strategy does it puts a face to it, like you post videos from your podcasts all the time, like it's one of those things where, if you can humanize your brand while addressing your company, you know Your Company's biggest challenges, do little things like that, because everything I just mentioned, by the way, doesn't cost that much money, like it's not that hard, you know, to jump on zoom and record that and like, like you've said, you mentioned it on my podcast when you are on their look to the experts in your organization. It doesn't always need to be the marketing team that's leading a conversation like this. It could be, you know, one ear sales guys and one of your domain experts, one year application engineers and the CEO the company, whatever the mix is, whoever the right person talk about it is. It gets people knowing. It educates people, showing that you know what the issues in the market are. They'll start to learn that you have the solutions that can address those problems. And then, finally, it humanizes your brand, which is the one thing that's missing right now. Shouldn't say the one thing, but one of the big things missing right now with trade shows. Man, I love everything you just said for a few reasons. The first one is because I'm going to take the clip of what you just said and do exactly what you just suggested. So you will be seeing this on on Linkedin and other places like that's a perfect example right there. I'm going to take a two minute clip of what Chris said, I will cut it out and they will be get published and and that, as a standalone piece, is a great marketing piece. It will fuel conversation will be able to target. I could put an AD budget behind it if I want, and say show this video to everybody with this marketing or sales job title at the manufacturing companies of this size in the United States with these interests. Or I can just post your organically and generate your activity that way, but it does it. or I could write it. I could hand it to a writer and say, Hey, I need to turn this into a short piece of written content. However you do it, a couple minutes of great insights there. I could just fuel a whole bunch of content and and anybody can do this. And I'm going to take it another step further because you talk about like sharing it and then putting some ad budget behind it. That takes place on the company page. We're talking about salespeople being better marketers. There's no reason you can't give, you know, if you're the marketing league, give to these video clips to your sales teams like hey, here's some cool, really authentic, you know, clips of your friends, your team members, talking about the things we do in the market. If I'm a sales guy, I've just been given like the content. I need to share it. That point. It's authentic. I can relate to it because it's Jill in application engineering or it's Bob in, you know, the C suite, or whatever it is. I'm more excited to share that than I would be, you know, let's say, the picture of my latest packaging machine or the picture of my latest...

...controller. After that. Yeah, and when it becomes really powerful is after you get off a sales call and you talked about, you know whatever, some issue that that person had, and then you say, you know what, I've got a video, or three videos, because I've been doing this for a year, that where I've got one of my engineers talking about that exact thing and I'm just going to send a link to it. And and when you when all of a sudden you can fire that link and your follow up email is opposed to the typical you know, hey, just checking in to see if you've thought more about our proposal or whatever. Well, now you're creating value. You're demonstrating that you're an expert in this because there's a human being on your team with, you know, an engineering job tyler or whatever, who's the one talking about it. And it also just demonstrates you thought about this before, like this is not, you know, we didn't just make this up on the spot, like Oh, here's this video that we recorded and has been published, you know, on Youtube or on our website or even on Linkedin for the last six months. So, so much that can be accomplished by this. Definitely, no, it's I mean it's all about content repurposing. At that point, you don't have to reinvent the wheel every time. Chances are if you take one good piece of content, talk about it on a video, right about it in a blog post, chop it up throughat on social media, you can get a lot of mileage out of these things, not just you know this next week, but years from then. Yep, and I think something that's changed the last few years for the better is that there's no longer this expectation that the things you publish have to be perfect, like yeah, if you're publishing gritten content, you need to you need to prove free and make sure there's not spelling errors and bad grammar and stuff. But I think the thing I love about video and the podcast medium is this more forgiving. Like this, this recording will have a video and audio component to it. There's arms in Oz as stumble over my words, like you know, we've backtracked at times and everything. And Yeah, WE'LL COO'll cut out the huge ones, but like, for the most part it's going to be fine. How it is, like whatever. So I sneeze in the middle of love the episode or stuff. That right. It's not the things we're saying. If they are valuable to somebody, that's what matters. And so I think if we can get manufacturing people in that same mindset, like this does not have to be a five thousand dollar produced video that we brought a videography for him to shoot. I love the way you do it, Chris. It's like, well, I get my get my clients on the phone. I talked to him for fifteen minutes about the biggest issues are seeing their customers having and now you've probably got about fifteen minutes. You probably got five to ten minutes of good stuff that you can use. And and it doesn't have to be perfect. It's more human. If it's not perfect. Well, not only is it more human, but another thing about being okay with that imperfection is you can do it a lot faster. And I've got a perfect example for this. Like last about a week and a half ago there was a cyber attack on a water treatment plant in Florida. I'm not I'm not sure if you heard the news. This is so would have been super bowl weekend when it happened. You know, I called up one of my buddies that's in the cyber security space. I'm like, Hey, let's jump on Zoom, let's your court a quick video and just say hey, here are three things you can do to to prevent a cyber attack like that happening to your company. We had, you know,...

...that the you know, it took me until like much late Monday or Tuesday, I think, of the idea. But within I think two days after that happened, we had a great piece of content out on Linkedin. People sharing it organically because it was timely. Because, I'll tell you what, I saw probably a hundred different people share the news about what happened in that scenario. We were the only people that shared this is what you can do to prevent yourself from getting in that same situation. So the last thing I drive home what we were just talking about is that speed element. When you're okay with imperfection, you can get something out there that's still pretty darn good, but way more relevant than other things you might be thinking about sharing. That is a perfect example. I just love that. I mean it's, you know, what is your domain of expertise? What is going on in the world that you can actually offer an opinion on and, you know, build on, like help people figure out how to get through something right, like no better example than that. Really good. Now, that was. I'm glad you well, you're interviewing skills, are bringing these things to mind. This is now. This is good stuff. I hope we're given some good, good info to your audience today. Yeah, I hope so. To him, I think. I think you certainly are so great. So, Chris, what else? Anything you want to touch on here before we put a wrap on this one? I mean, I love the the advice you've offered about linkedin. I love the everything we've gotten into here about, you know, how to how to make up for this lack of trade shows and create a more digital focused marketing approach. But I think else you want to touch on? Keep it simple is probably my biggest thing. Let and I'm glad this is where the conversation is gone, because too many people are thinking about creating that tenzero dollar video. Think about providing immediate value that addresses timely issues for your customers, like get get that blocking and tackling right. We got a lot of salespeople that are at home right now that are trying to do these marketing things. We've got a lot of marketing organizations that have more time on their hands because they're not messing with trade shows. Think about ways of getting quick, timely content out that really helps the people you're trying to serve, because you're just trying to get the conversation started. Once that relationship starts buttting, then you can talk about products and services and things like that and how you can help. But, you know, getting getting some of the basics around authentic human connection when it comes to marketing. I think is the thing I just like to drive home. Love it. Yeah, can't agree any more than that. It's right on the money. Well, Chris, great conversation. This was fun. If we were doing it on your show we would have been having a beer, which which is always a plus, but hopefully this was still enjoyable for you. So but I hate the beer. Is just the medium to let people know we don't need to get to. You know, these are casual conversations, man. Manufacturing happy ever is about taking on the biggest issues impacting manufactures in a way that's approachable, the way you describe it, with someone at a bar and and Joe. You're honestly doing great stuff on your show to the stuff you're doing...

...for industrial marketers, I've learned some stuff from it. You're doing incredible things over their gorilla seventy six. So it's been a lot of fun jamming with you on Linkedin and sales and marketing strategies this afternoon. Awesome. I really appreciate that. So, Chris, where, where can people learn about manufacturing happy hour? Get in touch with you, learn more about what you're doing? Yep, I would say manufacturing happy ourcom. That's the quickest spot. That's where you can access me. That's where you can find out. You know that you know a lot of the things we talked about today in terms of blocking and tackling with sales and marketing. That's what I help sales people and marketers with. Manufacturing happy hourcom is a great hub. And then, of course, on Linkedin. We've been talking about it all day. Search for Chris lukey on Linkedin. I should. I think I'm the only one on there, but last name is Eliuecke and you can find me. There is unfortunately too many Joe Sullivan's on and you have about the most common name there possibly is. So but yeah, go check out Chris. Chris post some really great insights. You're going to find snippets from his podcast, just like he's, she talked about today, practicing what he preaches. So check out what he's doing. His show is awesome. I manufacturing happy hour, so crack a beer and, you know, kick back and watch some some of Chriss shows or listen to his podcasts. So all right, Chris Wald, once again, thanks for doing this today. I really appreciate it. Cheers, man, this was fun. Thanks everyone for listening. Awesome and as for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to the manufacturing executive podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for BTB manufacturers at Gorilla, seventy sixcom learn thank you so much for listening. UNTIL NEXT TIME.

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