The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 7 months ago

Thinking like a Marketer: Reframing the Sales Mindset w/ Chris Luecke

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Manufacturers love trade shows. But for a year, we've had to do without them. Plus, shows may never come back the way they once were. How can manufacturers create content, build relationships, and generate leads without shows?

In today's episode, I talk with Chris Luecke, podcast host and community builder at Manufacturing Happy Hour. Chris offers a full plate of both strategic advice and down-and-dirty tactics about how sales-focused organizations can think more like marketers.

Here's what we discussed:

  1. Why videos and podcasts are great ways for manufacturers to build relationships
  2. How sales professionals can improve results with micro marketing
  3. Ways manufacturers can leverage LinkedIn in a meaningful and impactful way


To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

Think about ways of getting quick,timely content out that really helps the people you're trying to servebecause you're just trying to get the conversation started once thatrelationship starts butting, then you can talk about products and servicesand things like that and how you can help welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving. Midsize manufacturers. florward here you'll discover newinsights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories toshare about their successes and struggles, and you will learn from btobsales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable businessdevelopment strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show Welcomei to another episode of theManufacturing Executive Podcast, I'm Joe Sullivan, your Houst and acofounder of the Industrial Marketing Agency Gerilla. Seventy six. I'mexcited about this conversation today because my guest is another pro fromthe industrial marketing world, but whereas I came up through marketing andcobuilt my agency around the manufacturing sector, I guessed issomeone who came up through manufacturing and has done a dangoodjob figuring out marketing and he's got a full plate of both strategic adviceand down and dirty tactics to share about how sales focused organizationscan think more like marketers. So let me take a moment to introduce ChrisLukey. Chris lukey is a podcaster marketer and selfproclaimed mediamaverick in the manufacturing industry as the host of the PODCAST and VideoSeries Manufacturing Happy Hour, Christ interviews, leaders in the industrialsector to simplify and explore the waytos trans, an technologies impactingmodern manufacturers. Chris recently left a sales job of eleven years, withRockwell automation to pursue podcasting and marketing full time. Henow helps manufacturers, their marketing leaders and ther sales.People create lead, generating digital content, build dedicated customercommunities. Chris Welcome to the show Joe it's good to be here, glad to be onyour show. You've been doing a great job with this, and it's an honor to behere. Well, I'm just following your lead. Man You're, like one of thepioneers that the podcasting world in IA manufacturing so love. What you'vebeen doing. That's how I found you in the first place and and then we youknow, we struck up conversation a while back. I got to be a guest on your showand but yeah. So thanks for the inspiration along the way, absolutelyman Heyyou're one of the best around when it comes to industrial marketing.So I'm always borrowing tips from you as well awesome. I appreciate that soChris, the dynamic between you and me is kind of funny. It's you, your youare a St Louis born and raised industrial marketing guy living inMilwaukee. Now I, on the other hand, am a Milwaukee born and raised industrialmarketing Guy Livinggain, St Louis, you came to Milwaukee years back. Did youUNDERGRAD at Marquett University? I went to Marqet University High School,a few blocks down the road from there,...

...and now we both host podcast formanufacturing people so kind of a little bit eerie, the sort of likereverse path, we've taken and then yet we've wound up in this in the sameworld. So anyway, this thisip is going to be fun yeah. No, it's the one I'dsay one thing we do have in common right now is it's freezing cold in bothof our respective areas that it is, and I was used to that weather when youknow living in Milwaukee. Of course, it's I mean for context here like we're.Recording this in in mid February, and it's February fifteenth- and it is, is,I think, currently zero degrees, or maybe one degree right now in St Louis,which is an and there's snow, just dumping on us, which we don't get a tonof but used to it where you are, but even there I mean t, that's prettypretty darn cold, so yeah yeah. For me, it's getting used to it after movingback from California, but it is good to be backmidwest good. Well, we're goodto have you back in the Midwest or glad to Heae y back in the Midwest, soawesome! Well, let's get into it here. You know before we really dive into theconversation, though Chris I'd love for you to just tell our listeners a littlebit about your background at Rockwell, automation and sort of what led you towhere you are today and what you're doing now, yeah so goodgood question.So I started with Rockwell right out of college, so it's been, you know, had aneleven year career with them. They set me up for a lot of success, reallyenjoyed my time working in the Houston Texas, as well as the San Franciscomarket. I basically split my time between those two and you know. While Iwas there, I was a sales guy, the whole time, individual contributor, and whatI'm doing now, I'm really focusing on helping industrial companies kind ofget the blocking and tackling right when it comes to sales and marketingstrategies, and I really approach it from a sales standpoint provide contexton what I do when I move from Houston Texas to San Francisco. I was callingon a much older generation when I was in Houston. You know people that hadbeen working at their companies for twenty thirty years. They valued youknow you showing up for the face to face meeting. They valued the handshake,they valued the relationship. Then, when I moved to the bay area, all of asudden, I was in a market with you know, twenty and thirty something year olds,making all the decisions and they were consuming content and buildingrelationships differently. So I started adopting a lot of what I would say,marketing tactics into my sales strategy about four years ago, when Ineeded a new way to penetrate and break more into my market. So I started doingvideos started doing podcasts and ultimately, that led me to realize gosh,that's a great way for industrial companies, whether it's their marketingteams or their individual contributors to create content, build relationshipsand ultimately drive awareness around what they do in an authentic way. Soyou know it was really. My experience is a salesperson that led me to whatI'm doing today, where I'm really helping companies get the blocking andtackling around their marketing correct. I think it's great, I mean I beenworking with manufacturers, for you know our agencies existed for fourteenyears and it's been probably about...

...eight or nine years of workingspecifically with manufacturers, and I tell you there is. I can confirm thereis a need for for what you are doing here. So you've come to the right place,it's good, so something you and I have talked about Chris. I think what youjust says a good lead into this, but a common observation. I think that we'vehad is that the manufacturing sector is largely lagging behind in terms of itsmarketing skill set, and you you've got these great organizations, big andsmall. Many of your family owned, second or third generation operationsand they've built amazing, successful businesses, but on the backs of repeatcustomers and referrals, and in a lot of cases, really strong sales teams Kno,they understand how to sell in a consultative way or a lot of the bestpeople. Do. I think, through you know, often long and complex, buyingprocesses to committee of buyers, but when it comes to marketing they kind ofdefault, to what I call First Person Pronoun Marketing, where it's just all.I me my Wesr or in other words, are talking about themselves and theirdefault medium for shooting or for shouting. That message is largely tradeshows and printads and brochures website. That's just a digital broshure,but something I've heard you talk about, is you know, and it really struckaccord with me. Is this idea that marketing or that Maybu facturing salesprofessionals need to start thinking like marketers? So I'm going to I'mgoing to stop there and just ask you: what do you mean by that when you kindof got into like creating videos and embracing technology, but when you when,when you talk about sales, people, thinking like marketers in theindustrial sector like what does that mean great question? I'd say theeasiest way to think about. It is sales people need to start thinking aboutthemselves as their own marketing department or doing micromarketing as aterm I'll just throw out there. Where I talked about, I was creating videos formy customers. You know, let's think about some of the mediums, thatmarketing departments are using they're, getting targeted on social mediathey're using newsletters they're using email marketing. There's, no reasonthat a salesperson or an account manager shouldn't be adopting thosesame type of habits if, at the end of the day, the goal is the same you'retrying to build de relationships and ultimately create conversions, bring innew customers. There's no reason that sales people shouldn't be looking atthe marketing department and saying you know what. If I did that on a smallscale, with my account base, I can probably accelerate the growth of mycustomers or my account package, or I could bring in my next customer byfinding them on Linkdon what I always, I think of it in terms of really sinceI've been a sales guy, the whole time I think, of marketing purely in terms ofa sale standpoint. If I'm a sales guy, I just need to block off time toprospect on Linkdon or write that newsletter. At the same way, I wouldblock off time for a call with a customer so that that's my first answer.I think we're going to get into some of these elements a little bit more, butreally just thinking. Micro marketing is what I would say yeah. I thinkthat's a great point. It seems, like...

...sales professionals have a tendency tojump into selling too fast and there's there's you know, and it's tough whenyou've got sales goals to reach for this month of this quarter of this year.But you know the reality is for a lot of companies. There's there's a processthere and it takes time to develop these leads, and I think that's whatwhat good marketers are really good at doing is you're. Looking at likethere's a performance base, marketing element to what you're doing whereyou're you know, you are trying to help you sales steam, reach these specificgoals in the short term, but a lot of marketing is it's really lead development. It'sbuilding awareness, establishing thought leadership, becoming a trustedsource of information and making sure that the right people are seeing you ona consistent basis, and I think that the best sales people out there canprobably a o lot of them. Can probably do it very well they're. Just not doingit no doubt. Well, I think the one strength that good salesperson bringsto marketing roles- they're, usually predisciplined they've- got to be goingin their funnel to update their funnel they've got to be making ten fifteenhour. Many calls a week. You've got to have some discipline process to get toget that in place. So how hard is it to say? Okay for these two hours, I'mgoing to write my monthly newsletter to my customers, or for this hour eachmorning this week, I'm going to spend some time on Linkdon, providing valueposting good content, but also, let's say responding to some of my customersthat have engaged with my content or some of my partners as well. It'sreally making it it's getting in a habit, that's what it is like the samehabits you'd have for funnel discipline or making sales calls or leadingsomeone through that buying process of salesperson, take some of thosemarketing tactics and do the same thing with those yeah great way to look at it.So let's talk about Linkedin a little bit more because you- and I are bothpretty active onlinked in. We both know how powerful it is not just becausepeople tell us hat it is, but because we've seen the impact, but I think thatmost sales professionals who haven't really immersed theurselves in theplatform are kind of missing the boat they're jumping in there they'reconnecting with as many people as they can, and when people accept theirconnect Roquest, it's immediately throw sales fitch at them and then, of course,you're going to get ignored. You don't act that way in real life. So why wouldyou act that way online? But, but I guess tell me the value you see in thetool and how you think linked in can be best leveraged in a meaningful andimpactful way. Gosh there are. There are a number of different ways: I'mgoing to start with the most basics in terms of how to leverage it. You Me-and you mentioned it right- Tho Start, there's a lot of III self, proclaimingpronouns flip that and make it about you. You you on Linkdon, whether you'rereaching out to someone whether you're talkig talking about your solution,really put it in the perspective of how does this help someone else or how canI potentially serve someone else, or how do I connect with someone else as avery base starting point? I would just...

...connect with your existing customersand use it as a way to nurture them, because we always think of I shouldtsay always, but a lot of us think in sales in terms of pulling in the nextcustomer. Well, at the end of the day, it's always easier to grow yourrelationship and grow your share with an existing customer. So a very basicstep, one that I always forget to mention is connect with those thatyou're already serving right out of the gate, especially if someone hasn't usedlinkeon. Now, if I'm someone that is more savvy with it understand the PLATplatform understand how to make connections with Linkedon a bit betterif you're using it as a way to cold connect with individuals. There are acouple ways you can do it. The most basic thing is: If you're reaching outto someone, don't do it from a standpoint of hey. You know I saw thatwe have a couple common connection requests. I hope we connect. Don't dosomething generic like that. Certainly don't do what you were saying likegoing in with a sales pitch saying: Hey, we have this new product or we servecompanies. Just like you would you like to have a conversation today. We allknow that that's not how the sales process works. So why would anyonethink that's how it would work on social media? A much better way, Iwould say, is: Let's say you see one of your top prospect or one of yourcustomers post, something great use that as you're in to connect with themand say hey, I love that machine. You just shared I've. It looks like itsolves x, problem for someone in the packaging industry use that as here andtalk about them, people want to hear about them. I'm going to be much morelikely to accept that connection request than someone that's pitchingthemselves straight from the GETGO yeah. Absolutely I mean you know you kind ofsaid it like people care about themselves. They care about theirproblems. He things they're trying to accomplish, and maybe they will careabout you at some point right, but not until you've sort of demonstrated thatyou, you you know, can create some kind of value for them, or at least thatyou're there for a genuine relationship not to try to just sell them. Somthing right, likewe'll see through that. I'm really saying this from a standpoint of if youare someone that, let's say someone's running the Marketing Organization,talk about these lessons with your sales people as well, make sure thatthey understand this because, where, where I'd hate, someone to get held upis thinking, it's like hey. These are basic concepts, but for a lot of peoplethis might be the first time they're hearing about it. So if you are theperson in your organization, that's listening to this. That knows thesethings try to find ways to distribute that information as well. Yeah GreatPoint: I like that, a lot and there's for those of you sales people out therewho are listening, there's a phenomenal sales consultt that I follow on linked.In course, I don't know if you know him to names, Josh, Brawn, BR, a UN go,follow hem as you have it, but so I don't know that anybody is givingbetter advice right now about how to make a actual human connection withsomebody through cold outreach and Y. U be able to genuinely establish raportwith prospects than Bajoshas side bar here and and by the way he's not payingme to say this is is just I talk about his stuff, because his message is justreally resonates, but he's got this. This guide called the Badass btobgrowth guide, really great stuff, but...

...one of the concepts that Josh talksabout all the time is this idea of making deposits before takingwithdrawals, and it's just all about. How can you create value for somebodyand when you start to do that consistently by posting insights by youknow, trying to help people solve their problems? Yo know this happens in reallife. It happens in social media too, but that's how you can start to earnpeople's trust and attention and then it's a lot easier to make the small askto ask for that: Fifteen minute phone call or whatever, because you're notyou're, not leading by with with the Mimi me, I want to add kind of anadvanced linked in tactic. On top of this, for the salespeople as well,because we've talked about the cold outreach, you know prospecting on there.I would say a first step for most sales people that, as you're getting intoLinkon, get linked in sales navigator as a tool. I know we're getting morereally specific here, but we're talking about having context for making theseintroductions that's a great way to follow the top companies you're goingafter follow the top people you're trying to build connections with andget notified when they're doing something on that platform. Becausethen it's not just it's not a cold out reach anymore you're, seeing whensomeone is sharing content you're. Seeing when a particular trend isimportant to someone, because they're posting about it, you're gettinginsight into the things that they care about, and you can make an introductionat that point- a warm introduction by catering to the exact things thatthey're interested in. I actually like that you're going down that rabbitwhole little bit, because I think it's some really good tactical advice,because you know a lot of times. I've heard manufacturing people say well,you know what, like you know, our VPF sales has got sales navigator or youknow we're worth thinking about trying it out for some of our people, but Idon't really know what ou now, what to do with it, and I think that's a reallygood use for a tool like that is build that sort of listening listwhere you're your job is to say well, who is lot of companies? Have a targetlist like these? Are The you know these wull be fifty great companies we want,we want to connect with, or we could do business wither. If you don't well, youshould do that, but this gives you the opportunity to flag all these companiesand the appropriate individuals at those companies who you want to be youraudience and then, like Chris said, you can get alerts when those pecifiocspecific people post something so your job when you go into the platform, isyou're going to look at that list and see how you know what people areposting. What they're talking about it gives you a chance to jump in and andengage in conversation with them and once you've done that five or ten timeswell now, they've seen you, they know who you are you've, hopefully createdvalue and added to the conversation they already having. And and U know, asChris said, it's a warm intro now, not just a you know: Who's this guy, Chrisor Joe or whoever. That's that's. You know trying to sell me something out ofnowhere right. Well, even thinking of it from the mind of a salesperson againlike the technology aside linked in a...

...side. Imagine if someone you know tenfifteen years ago, said I'm going to give you visibility to the top. Fiftytop one hundred top two hundred people you'd want to work with wheneverthey're going to talk about the things that are important to them. So you can.Your timing can be perfect, like if someone said that magic existed thatnumber of years ago, you jump on it right it away. The other thing is ou.We talked about it, the start sales people have quotas, they have to hittheir numbers this month as well. I never want to encourage someone goinginto linkdon with that, like, oh I'm going to convert someone really quickly,but when the first thing you do, is you create that listening list, as youdescribed, theyare, probably going to be people, you can form acceleratedrelationships with just because there's so much context there and you can do itin a way. That's not irritating you do it in a way that really caters to thethings that are important to them when they're important to them there. You Goanything else you dad about linked in Chris before we kind of bounce to thenext thing. Gosh I feel like we've covered some good basics and some goodadvanced strategies I mean, I think the biggest thing is is getting in thehabit like for the salespeople out there, even the marketers, like blockoff the time to post something worthwhile and respond to people that,assuming that you've been doing this on a regular basis or start doing it on aregular basis, keep those conversations going like when I think of content thatI post to linked in there two categories that are always good,something that addresses a current challenge in the market that you cansolve. Not Saying: Hey our product solves this problem, but bringing upthe conversation starting that conversation. So educating people onwhat's going on in the market and some of the things you're hearing around it,that's one. The other thing is celebrate your customers, man. We talkabout prospects and we talk about existing customers, whether it'ssomeone you're courting or whether it's a customer that you've been with awhile. If you see them post something that they're excited about reshare,that t at the very least comment on it and things like that, like I alwaysfind celebrating your customers or the people that you'd like to be yourcustomers is one of the best strategies to get people lookin your way onLinkedin yeah. I absolutely can't disagree with that and to your firstpoint there you know linkedire's a great place for you to just have avoice and have an opinion. I think thereare, probably plenty of listenershere who have at some point either beet a speaker at an event or written and editorial article in a in amanufacturing trade journal. It's kind of a microversion of all that therethere are things going on that your audience cares about theis problems,thay're trying to solve a and you know how to solve them, or you have anopinion on how to do it. Maybe there's current events that that you know youcan offer a perspective on it's, it's a great platform for doing that andstarting those conversations and inviting others into thoseconversations. And then people start commenting and your post gets morevisibility, because linkdon's algorithm plays to that it wants to show contentto people or to people that are. That is going to be engaging, and soeverything sort of starts to snowball.

Then, and before you know it, you'vegot a a following and you're having conversations with the right people, soit takes some patiencs to take some work, but I think you have to go outthere and be authentic. You need to have an opinion about things. Don'tfocus on you focus like Chris said on the audience and the things that theycare about and good things are going to come from it. So excellent sum, Rijiocouldnt is that it better awesome? Well, okay, let's, let's go in anotherdirection here for a second one thing: that's undeniable about manufacturersfrom my time, working with them is that they love their trade chows, andrightly so. I have. I have a lot of clients who rely on them from year toyear to they generate good leads. They can trace that to revenue, and so, whenthat's happening great, you know I can't. I can't argue against it. Ithink tracho strategy in general needs a lot of work for a lot of companies,but it's a part of the mix, and then you know here we are in Q, one of oftwo thousand and twenty one, and it's been almost a year now without tradeshows, and probably at least another couple of quarters for for most, and soI'm just kind of curious. What Oyou're thinking about all this Chris and howyou're advising manufacturers right now who are the especially compies, arestill kind of reeling without these shows that have been ingrained in theirbused up strategy forever. Yeah, IT'S FO! First of all, you're totally right,like it manufactures love trade shows it's been kind of the default. In fact,I think- and I know you work with a lot of people in this regard- gettingpeople think as marketing more than just events, because that's always beenthe default right. It's like oh well, marketing is our big trade shownd. Isthese three industry ones we go to every year? The reality is it's allabout creating awareness, it's all about generating leads. It's all aboutnurturing those relationship. So what are the ways that you can do that as amarketing organization? I think right now, more than ever, it's important forsales and marketing to work together, and I'm also saying this from themindset of someone that just left a large company and started working withsmaller organizations, because there's a lot that those organizations canborrow from one another. So one thing I'll give a very specific example. Onething I'm doing with one of my clients right now were: will record zoom callsevery once in a while, we'll just get hem recorded, where we'll talk aboutsome of the biggest issues, some of the biggest questions that their customershave and well just riff about it. For, like sixteen minutes, talk about heywhat are the three biggest ways people can solve this problem ore. What arethe three biggest issues someone's experiencing when it comes to purasingcapital equipment? Will film that you know it'll be like what eighteen twentyminutes long and it's not the cleanest video in the world, but when it's done,we can chop that up into a bunch of different little content that we canshare out there, that you can format into like a quick two minute, videothat addresses a hot topic that their customers are facing right now, you dothat enough times. You can turn that stuff. You talk about at Garila.Seventy six turn that Video Anto, a big blog post into a piece of pillarcontent or heck. If you already have...

...those blog posts, use that as yourguide for the conversation start, creating micro content like that thatyou can use to get that message out there in a human fashion. I thinkthat's one of the biggest kickers about it, because yeah people are usinglinkdon a bit more right now. Undoubtedly, people have started toadopt that, and I should say other social media in general, but what thisstrategy does? It puts a face to it, like you, post videos from your podcastall the time like it's one of those things where, if you can humanize yourbrand while addressing your Cupa, you know your company's biggest challenges.Do little things like that, because everything I just mentioned by the waydoesn't cost that much money like it's not that hard. You know to jump on zoomand record that and like, like you said you mentioned it on my podcast. Whenyou were on there, look to the experts in your organization. It doesn't alwaysneed to be the marketing team. That's leading a conversation like this. Itcould be. You know one of year sales guys and one of your domain experts oneyear application engineers in the CEO, the company, whatever the mixes,whoever the right person talk about it is it gets people knowing it educates,people showing that you know what the issues in the market are they'll startto learn that you have the solutions that can address those problems andthen finally, it humanizes your brand, which is the one thing that's missingright now, shouldn't say the one thing, but one of the big things missing rightnow with trade shows man. I love everything. You just said for a fewreasons. The first one is because I'm going to take the clip of what you justsaid and do exactly what you just suggested. So you will be seeing thison on winked in and other places. Like that's a perfect example right thereI'm going to take a two minute clip wo Chris said I will cut it out and itwill be a published and and that, as a standalone piece is a great marketingpiece, itill fuel conversation will be able to target. I could put an ADbudget behind if I want and say show this video to everybody with thismarketing or sales job title at the manufacturing companies of this size inthe United States. With these interests- or I can just post it organically andgenerate yourkn activity that way, but it doesn't or I can write it, I couldhand it to a writer and say hey well. I need to turn this into a short piece ofwritten content. But, however, you do it a couple minutes of great insightsthere. It could just fuel whole bunch of content, and- and anybody can dothis and I'm going to take it another step further, because you talk aboutlike sharing it and then putting some ad butchet behind it that takes placeon the company page, we're talking about sales, people being bettermarketers. There's no reason you can't give you know if you're the marketinglyad give these video clips to your sales teams, like hey here's, some cool,really authentic. You know clips of your friends your team members, talkingabout the things we do in the market if I'm a sales guy I've just been givenlike the content. I need to share at that point. It's authentic. I canrelate to it because it's Jill in application engineering or it's Bob,and you know the seasweet or whatever it is, I'm more excited to share thatthan I would be. You know, let's say the picture of my latest packagingmachineor, the picture of my latest...

...controller after that yeah and when itbecomes really powerful, as after you get off a sales call, and- and youtalked about you know whatever some issue that that person had and then yousay you know what I've got a video or three videos, because I've been doingthis for a year that, where I've got one of my engineers talking about thatexact thing and I'm just going to send a link to it and and when you, when,all of a sudden, you cound fire that link and your followup emails opposedto the typical. You know: Hey O, just checking in to see if you've thoughtmore about our proposal or whatever well now, you're creating value you're,demonstrating that you're an expert in this because there's a human being onyour team with you know an engineering job teyler, whatever who's the onetalking about it, and it also just demonstrates you've thought about thisbefore like this is not you know, we didn't just make this up on the spot,like oh here's, this video that we recorded an has been published. Youknow on Youtube or on our website or even onLinkedin for the last six months, so so much that can be accomplished by this.Definitely no it's I mean it's all about content repurposing. At thatpoint, you don't have to reinvent the wheel. Every time chances are. If youtake one good piece of content, talk about it on a video right about it in ablog post chop it up throat on social media, you can get a lot of milage outof these things. Not just you know this next week, but years from then Yep, andI think something that's changed. The last few years for the better is thatthere's no longer this expectation that the things you publish have to beperfect, like yeah, if you're, publishing, writtan content, you needto, you need to prove, read it and end, make sure there's not spelling eirs andbad grammar and stuff, but I think that the thing I love Aboun, video and thepodcast medium- is this more forgiving like now this this recording will havea video and audio component to it. There's UNs and Os a stumble over mywords like you know, we backtracked at times and andeverything and Yeah WelCill cut out the the huge ones but like for the most part, it's going to befine, how it is like whatever so I sneeze in the middle of Lov, theepisode or stuff that right, it's not the things were saying if they arevaluable to somebody, that's what matters, and so I think, if we can getmanufacturing people in that same mindset like this does not have to be afive thusand dollar produced video that we brought a videographer in to shoot.I love the way you do it. Chris, it's like WHA. I get my I get my clients onthe phone. I talk to him for fifteen minutes about the biggest issues there,seeing their customers having and now you've probably got ofr that fifteenminutes. You probably got five to ten minutes of good stuff that you can usean and it doesn't have to be perfect. It's more human. If it's not perfect.Well, not only is it more human but another thing about being. Okay withthat imperfection is you can do it a lot faster and I've got a perfectexample for this. Like last about a week and a half ago, there was a cyberattack on a water treatment plant in Florida. I'm not I'm not sure. If youheard the news this is so would have been super bowl weekend when ithappened. You know I called up one of my buddies. That's in the CYRU securityspace, I'm like hey, let's jump on zoom, let's record a quick, video and justsay: Hey here', three things you can do to preventa cyber attack like thathappening to your company. We had you...

...know that you know it took me untillike Mo late Monday or Tuesday to think of the idea, but within I think, twodays after that happened, we had a great piece of content out on linkdonpeople sharing it organically, because it was timely because I'll tell youwhat I saw. Probably a hundred different people share the news aboutwhat happened. In that scenario, we were the only people that share. Thisis what you can do to event yourself from getting in that same situation. Sothe last thing I drive home. What we were just talking about is that speedelement when you're, okay within perfection, you can get something outthere, that's still pretty darn good, but way more relevant than other thingsyou might be thinking about sharing. That is a perfect example. I just lovethat I mean it's. You know what is your domain of expertise? What is going onin the world that you can actually offer an opinion on, and you know,build on like help people figure out how to get through something right,like no better example than that really good. Now that was I'm glad you wellyyour. Interviewing skills are bringing these things to mind, so this is now.This is good stuff. I hope we're given some good good inphoto your audiencetoday, yeah, no, I hope so toime. I think I think you certainly are so great so Chris what else anything youwant to touch on here before we put a rap on this one I mean I love he, theadvice youve offer about linkedin. I love the everything we've gotten intohere about you know how to how to make up for this lack of trade shows andcreate more digital, focused marketing approach, but anything else you want totouch on keep it simple is probably my biggest thing. What and I'm glad thisis where the conversation is gone, because too many people are thinkingabout, creating that tenhusanddollar video think about providing immediatevalue that addresses timely issues for your customers like get get thatblocking and tackling right. We got a lot of sales people that are at homeright now that are trying to do these marketing things. We've got a lot ofmarketing organizations that have more time on their hands, because they'renot messing with trade, shows think about ways of getting quick, timelycontent out that really helps the people you're trying to serve becauseyou're just trying to get the conversation started once thatrelationship starts butting, then you can talk about products and servicesand things like that and how you can help, but you know getting getting someof the basics around authentic human connection when it comes to marketing,I think, is the thing I just like to drive home love. It yeah can't agreeany more than that. It's right on the money. Well, Chris Great Conversations,this was fun. If we were doing it on your show, we would have been having abeer which, which is always a plus, but hopefully this was still enjoyable foryou. So but I hat the beer is just the medium to let people know we don't needto get to you know these are casual conversations. Man, manufacture, hatyetwas, about taken on the biggest issues impacting manufactures in a way,that's approachable. The way you describe it with someone at a bar andand Joe you're honestly doing great...

...stuff on your show to the stuff you'redoing for industrial marketers, I've learned some stuff from it. You'redoing incredible things over there, Carila eventy six. So it's been a lotof fun Gamin with you on Linkdin and sales and marketing strategies thisafternoon awesome. I really appreciate that so Chris, where, where can peoplelearn about manufacturing happy hour, get in touch with you learn more aboutwhat you're doing yep, I would say, manufacturing happy Arcom, that's thequickest spot! That's where you can access me! That's where you can findout. You know that you know a lot of the things we talk about today in termsof blocking and tackling with sales and marketing. That's what I help: Salespeople and marketers with manufacturing. Happy ourcom is a great hub and then,of course, on Linkedon we've been talking about it all day, search forChris lukey on Linkeddon. I should I think, I'm the only one on there, butlast name is Leuecke and you can find me there S. unfortunately, too many JoeSullivan's on Tan y have about the most common name. There possibly is so, butyeah go check out Chris Chris Post, some really great insights, you're,going to find snippets from his podcast, just like Heshe talked about todaypracticing what he preaches so check out. What he's doing is show is awesome,manufacturing happy hour, so crack up beer- and you know kick back and watchsome. Some of chrisas shows or listen to his podcast. So all right, Chriswill once again thanks for doing this today, really appreciate it cheers man.This was fun thanks, everyone for listening, awesome and is for the restof you. I hope to catch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sale strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools, specificallyfor B to B manufacturers at grilla. Seventy SIXCOM LAHWARN. Thank you somuch for listening until next time.

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