The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 10 months ago

How to Innovate the Tired Trade Show Booth w/ Clive White & Zach Person

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

At the outset of the pandemic, trade shows were one of the many facets of business imperiled by the crisis.

But every crisis presents an opportunity for innovation.

And for today’s guests, Clive White, CEO, and Zach Person, General Manager, at Ensitech, a company that heavily relies on trade shows for garnering business, pushing past the initial pandemic panic ultimately paid off — fast forward to today, and they’ve revolutionized the trade show booth.

They join me to discuss:

- Their digital-analog hybrid trade show booth

- How they stayed well-prepared for the inevitable technological hurdles they knew they’d face

- How their innovative approach can be applied to other facets of business

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You can go in any best buy right now, spend about thousand bucks. You ever take by cameras, by lights, by everything you need, even green screens, and set it up and do it. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving midsize manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B tob sales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm Joe Sullivan, your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency Gorilla Seventy six. Over the last year and a half since I launched this podcast, I've had a handful of smart folks come on the show and talk about the power of video in our respective business environments. My guests have educated about video for marketing purposes and then sales applications and even for more efficient and human internal communications. But I've got a new one for you today. About a month removed from Fabtech two thousand and twenty one at the time I'm recording this. The two guys that you're about to hear from will tell you how they flipped the typical unimaginative trade show booth on its head with the help of a really smart video strategy, specifically live streamed video right from their facility into McCormick place in Chicago. Pay attention here, because these guys are a few years ahead of the curve, and I could promise you there are ideas you'll take away from what they're about to share. Let's get into it. ZAC person has spent his professional career on locking with the revenue potential of global teams that manufacture and sell a variety of metal fabricated products all over the world. He does this via the integration of systems, software and people, driven by clarity of vision, relentless implementation and process. The results have been turning...

...stagnation into acceleration and change into opportunity. Zach has launched products in thirty plus countries, currently specializing in the North America region. He's built companies from conception to commercialization and reorganized and revitalized entire sales and marketing departments. This experience allows Zach to work shoulders shoulder with everyone from admin staff to process engineers to presidents and CEOS. His career spans the private and public sector, including consulting and entrepreneurship. He's held a number of leadership roles, ranging from director of global business operations to Director of international sales to senior program manager. Zacher into BEA and marketing and a second PA in German, studies from Michigan State University. He currently lives in Chicago and enjoys giving back to the community by mentoring young professionals and donating time to start ups and small businesses. Clive white is part engineer, part visionary. As owner of ANCI tech and inventor of the TIG brush is electrical engineering expertise and passion for the product are the lynchpin of Anti Tech Innovation, research and development. Working closely with experts in other areas, including industrial chemistry, Clive's unique perspective on the development and potential to take brush has been the driving force behind its rapid success. A qualified electrical engineer, Clive previously held roles in sales for Motorola and developed software for on board automotive systems. Telecommunications and remuneration systems. Sack and Clive, welcome to the show. Thank you. Are doing good. Have you guys here and my business partner John, he made the introduction to us after he witnessed what he said was the most innovative trade show booth he saw while walking the halls at fabtack. So congrats on that. First of all. I thanks very much. So you know I've got a lot I want to cover with you guys here today. But tell her audience first, you know what was going through your heads as you entered two thousand and twenty one and you thought about what your trade show strategy was going to be. In the first place, the part...

...that we might needs to be showing to customers. So customers need to basically see it to believe it. So in the pandemic heats in March two thousand and twenty we had to cancel all our trade shows. So in two thousand and nineteen we went to sit in trade shows for the June and so we had to make a decision to cancel all the trade shows. So then we were left in this really strange place where we couldn't actually show our product to customers either. In trade shows or JEN visit customers. So we had to find a way of reaching that cat. So that's when we thought perhaps we could do something like a zoom as a way of connecting to our customers remotely. But the big problem was how can we get our customers to actually see the products and but to try it for themselves? So that was to be issue. Win The trade show Febte. It came up in two thousand and twenty one. We didn't really know if it was going to go ahead. So it's the first trade show we've really been back to, and so we thought if we created a virtual environment, even if the trade show was canceled, we could basically s still carry on the trade show anyway, but just do it remotely. So that's there was the genesis of the idea. Got It, and so talk a little bit about what you know what that implementation actually looked like. I got here's what I'll tell our listeners. You know my business partner John. He was kind of walking down the hall and and all of a sudden here's I don't know which one of you guys are. was Go hey, you and they be in the blue girl is seventy six shirt and he kind of turns and like this TV's talking at them right, and I think he just made the assumption there was a recorded video going on there like they're probably is on a number of booths. But so to talk about what what your actual structure looked like and kind of how you guys have that set up? Well, I think I can. I'll I can jump in here a little bit because it to also give some additional background. Essentially, so our whole booth was virtual and real life at the same time. So we had three zoom feeds going all the time. We had a big giant larger than the live screen that was wented out into the crowd and that's where John was, and John's are in internal technical salesperson and it also technical support guy, but he's also a wonderful personality and he does a really good...

...job oft just talking at people and he actually helps do demos and he really did a good job of engaging people as they were walking by, because people are so used to seeing videos and it's just another talking head that's not going to talk to me, but will John just talk to him and brought them in and we had a mic and they were talking to each other and engaging and talking, and then he would do a demo showing what we did and how things work, and then he would just pass them on to us. We would then have a couple of stations set up to where the customer could use our product, but then right in front of them was another zoom session, one of three, where they get talked to, climb or talk to another salesperson in and Clive, by the way, was in Sydney, Australia at the time. We had other sales people that were in Aurora, Illinois at the time. They're all over the place. They're only about two of US physically in the boot and but really we had a whole stud of people in the boots supporting all these customers and we just feed him right in and and I would drop them off to talk to clive and they would do the demo on their own and I would go talk to somebody else, and that's just how it kind of flowed. And people just first of all, we're taking away with it. They were quite unsure what they were seeing until all of a sudden they just fell into a Oh, we're just talking to somebody on zoom, like we're doing for the last year and a half and it just started working and it was just normal talking to someone like that and just became very real, very normal very quickly, and people like that. It was news interesting, it was inovative and, you know, in a work really well. Yeah, you're right it. I mean it is. It is just normal. We're doing it right now to record this podcast. We all do it probably multiple times a day at this point with people. Why not? Why? I use live streaming video in in a trade show booth setting right. Yeah, it was a little bit different, I guess, though, in that zoom is designed to go office to office, so we actually wanted to demonstrate our product to people. So that's where it became a little bit more interesting, is to how we set the booth up. So we decide we'd have a big main screen to basically stop people, and that's what John didn't he was really good at that, including gorilla seventy six. And then we thought what do we do with people once they're stopped? I...

...had we actually get them to try the product out. So we thought there was going to be a bit of a psychological barrier there because you're in front of a big screen and the guy you know who's who's having up a little bit. How do you get someone to leave that group and go across? So that's where we decide to have some product on the on the actual booth itself to attract people. And then the issue was engaging with that person from the screen, from the zoom session, and that was really interesting. So because people have in their mind that it's just a video happening. Even when we said hello to the customer, often they just thought that it was that point in the video where the person said hello to someone else and so, you know luck you'd wave to them and they'd wave back, but then they'd be embarrassed because they just waved to a video and it was actually really interesting trying to get people to to realize that they were in a live engagement situation. So yeah, it had some interesting tving issues. But once we worked out where the bottom next, where ZAC, for example, did the introduction, so people would actually be introduced to the remote presenter, and once they realized luck sex said what was happening, then all of a sudden it all clicked and they were fine with it. It's interesting how difficult it was for people to understand what it was that we'd actually done to start off with. So you had John's big had on screen stopping people on their tracks. You had zach a live in person, actually bringing people over to a smaller screen where then somebody, also remote, was conducting a Damo, but your product was right their lives. That's right exactly. That's super interesting. What would just out of curiosity, what made you guys decide those people should be remote rather than in person? Well, part of it was that we had to develop the capability ourselves anyway to be able to reach our customers. So we were already using a technology which we developed really a year ago, and I suppose in one way it was it was to try and stretch our capability to see if we could literally do this at a trade show. And the other part of it is that we wanted to actually sell the concept of doing virtual demonstrations to our customers. So our customers are reluctant to engage in a virtual...

...demo because they think they're just going to be watching a video for an hour and everyone's power pointed to death. So to actually get people to realize that this is actually very engaging, very interactive and we will respond to their requests. It's not just going to be as preaching to them, and so we wanted the Trade Shaw to showcase that capability to customers and I think he did that. What do you think that? Yeah, it worked really well and it was the biggest part of what it loted to do. It allowed us to be more places at once, allowed us to bring resources to bear at the trade show no matter where they were in the world, and it allows us to do and also, because we were broadcasting from our warehouse, we had everything in that warehouse. If we had a customer come up and they wanted to use they were stick well and you got a need stick wells back there? Oh, yes, we do. We got everything you need to just grab and you go, and so you don't have to bring as much stuff to the boot because it's all the warehouse. It's all wherever we wanted to be, and work just fine. Yeah, it's I think it's really smart. A lot of good reasons to have done this. I mean, less people to send there, you can show more stuff from a distance and I, like are you guys, used it as as a sort of showcase. Hey, hey, customers, look what we could do remotely. Right. Yeah, it was also leavaging people's new familiarity with zoom and we also had a QC hade, so people used to using q codes to now. So we had a qcode next to the screen that they could skin with their phone and it would take them to landing page, so they could instead of taking a brochure with them, a paper pressure, they could literally take it away in their fine and we had a whole lot of stuff in their tuningcluding the possibility to book a lot of demo later after the show. So we put a lot of food into that, what we call the landing page that customers could take away with him. And then that also ended up working really well, because often people will take a paper brochure and it gets lost, but because this was in their phone, it was was something that they could use to contact us later or that we can contact them. So is this, is this a strategy you plan to replicate then, having done it both live and and in this sort of more technological remote way, something you're going...

...to do again? Yeah, absolutely, I think so. One Way to visualize is that we've created a virtual world in the trade show and we've invited people into that virtual world. So once you've got people to understand that as a concept, we can expose them to a lot of different experiences in that virtual world. So we can connect them with other customers, we can kick them with experts, we can show them products, we can show them videos if they want to see a video, we can show them technical documentation and we can do it very fast because already set up and they can walk away from the booth after a couple of minutes with a lot of different experiences that would normally take a long time to show them. So I think it really works in especially in the trade show setting. Yeah, it's great. So I'll shift gears here and talk more about this concept of live streaming because you know, frankly, trade shows are just one application for doing something like this, and you guys, I think Kudos to you for figuring out how to make that work. And we've gotten into this already. The whole worlds used to talking on zoom and I think that opens up a lot of possibilities that really people wouldn't have even thought about in eighteen months ago, frankly. So, and I guess as a result of this, the infrastructure for a live stream he was as stronger and you're becoming stronger, at least to support, you know, the required bandwidth and just technology required to do this. So I am just curious to hear you guys talk about what other applications, what other ways are you using live streaming in your business right now, everywhere? I mean it's really because part of what we're getting to the clives point proof a concept and also to gain trust in the idea, in the concept that they can just as long as they have a nice big screen. They can log in by a zoom. They don't. It's nice if they have a video camera to so we can look at each other talk to each other, but they don't necessarily have to have that because we've got the whole set up and they can just beam in and then talk to us and we can. They have to be able to see that they can see everything because we have the two camera setup, so they can see a closed they can see far away, and then because they we asked them, well, what are you doing? What are you well doing when you're working with we have everything there and then, therefore, they can feel comfortable with letting a show everything and...

...it shortens the sales cycle in terms of now the instead of, you know, two miles away, now they're about maybe, you know, ten feet, and they just need to talk to each other and have a few more conversations, you know, dial it into their specific application and then just buy. You know, that's where we're at right now, and people got more comfortable that kind of thing over the last year and a half. We were just really leveraging that change, because that's we're at very unique point in time in history where people are open to this idea. This would have never been able to happen two years ago. The things that we using it in gentally as well. So we holding week the stuff training says where we will send your training. That stuff can remote remote into and we've got an office in the US as well as one in Australia, so we use this capability to stay connected. We can also do repairs, and this is actually a really interesting thing that came out quite early on where a customer I had to repair that they were trying to do and couldn't work out to do something, so we did a live stream with them and actually showed them how to do the repair. So yes, it's actually ended up being very versatile and I think we still discovering new ways of using it. That's great. You know, let's brainstorm for here for a few minutes. What else could a manufacturer you know, how else could they do it? Like here's here's one I heard. I've seen this example actually play out for a client of ours, where they said, well, we've got this big product, this thing that sits, it's bigger than a human being, it's it's on a shop floor. Can't bring it with us and you show it to people, like yeah, maybe at a trade show, will once or twice a year or whatever, but why not, rather than setting up a phone call for a sales call or, you know, even a zoom call where they're sitting in an office? Why, you know, if you had the right technology in place, why not just conduct your your live, you know, consultations or calls with prospects right there from the shop floor where you're right in front of this thing, you could show it to them. So, you know, I like, I would love to see more of that kind of thing going on. I think people are just intimidated by the technology. But like, what else? What else do you guys think manufacturer should be thinking about in terms of...

...using live streaming at maybe they're not. Well, I'm just carrying on from what you're saying. Back in the s they came out with a video phone and it had a little tiny screen and the idea was that you could you could call someone and see them and it didn't work at all. But I think nowadays, with the technology that we've got, could be literally set the company where every single person in the company has a came around a microphone and when a customer rings that, we can literally zoom them instead of answering the call. So that's introduces some really interesting issues. That zoom hasn't continued yet. So how do you transfer a zoom call from one person to another? That doesn't exist yet. How could we transfer someone to a zoom session in, you know, like I lived, my room and then have them transferred back so that we can continue the conversation with them? So there are there is still some technology to be developed there, but we have literally set our whole company so every single person is prepared to zoom any time with customers or with other employees. So again that scenario, I think that you could definitely use more but I just taking us on a thought experiment. which is this idea of online sales, which have obviously taken off during the pandemic. The big problem with online sales is you have to buy something that you haven't seen or tried. So people have to trust the vendor and so vendors reduce that risk BOT offering money back, guarantees and stuff, which doesn't always work. So what people tend to do is they go to a shop, try stuff out for themselves and then go online to buy it. So the shopkeeper has to be in time with the customer but then doesn't spend the money with him, he spends it with someone else. So I think this he's a perfect way to beach that cap. So shop keep it can have a virtual shop where customers can actually talk to them about what it is that they want. The shop keep it can show them what they have and close the transaction there and then, without the person leaving and then buying someone else. So I think it's going to really find its niche in that. I know what did you call it? EXACT ECOMMERCE hybrid model. Yeah, so we think there's a huge cap there that these could fill. The talk of technology. Yeah,...

...that's really smart and I think and to add onto that and also to further touch on the point or the question you have to love it earlier, is that what should companies think about? And the number one thing we took away from all this is that it is a hundred percent possible using off the shelf equipment. You can go into any best buy right now, spend about thousand bucks you ever take by cameras, by lights, by everything you need, even green screens, and set it up and do it and zoom. Everybody knows how to zoom. Everybody knows how to use the Webcam and you know, we actually use the third party open source piece of software that allows us to use multicamera point angles of real time during the zooms. And but zoom is also getting better and better with time, and now you can actually put power point presentations in the green screen right behind you. Can you can plug in that way. So there's a lot of stuff that's happening that if you can't figure out yourself, do what everybody else do. It's just go to go to youtube and there's a billion people that have done it and it's a hundred percent possible, and I think that's what people that's what people were so amazed at is that? Holy Molly, these guys did it and and again. We keep on reiterating everything. Everything that's in this booths is the same stuff that's in your house. Mostly. Yeah, I think it's great, good for you guys. So people are, I need even tid nail, by their imagination, because the technology's is to the price point where any of us can be a TV station. So we can do the whole thing that a TV station can do, which is just really mind bubbling. I don't think this would have been possible even a year and a half ago, but technology has come down in price and the capability has increased to such an extent that yes, a foodabile for Justbreit, anyone in business to yet to buy this technology and set up. But it's the imagination. I think that's the issue right now, people being able to get over that hurdle of achieve seeing the possibilities and then exploring it. Let's get a little bit into the weeds on the technology. For Anybody who's sitting here listening thinking cheese. I would love to start doing the sum of the stuff, but like, where do I even start? You know, I think it's fair to say you don't need a professional videographer and House or Hollywood production studio these days, as...

...you've been communicating that, but there's still some investments you want to make, probably so that you know it's better than the I don't know that the Webcam is built in your Mac which, frank these garbage as I've found, and extra hundred twenty dollars for the Webcam, I'm music now makes a big difference. But you can step it up another level of if you really want to and still not break the bank. So I'm just curious, from camera to audio, to lighting to, you know, green screen or background like, what's the stuff that you guys have found is really worth investing in so that you can go from, you know, feeling like just you picked up your and Raider iphone and turned on the video to like you really feeling kind of a a little more professional. It will initially was just on EZAC before about this. The first time we did this was in March two thousand and twenty, when we realized that we had to try and find a different way of connecting to customers. So we had no idea what we were doing. So we just went out to the local CHEMERA STORE AND CANADA DIS released their La is then fifty and everyone was saying it was very cheap for its capability. So we grabbed that. We tried to plug the into zoom and it didn't work at all. So then it was trying to work ahead. It connected through the zoom, so we searched around for software and fans software we could use, but then the sound was no good. So you don't realize when you're talking to a computer at a desk at close you are, but as soon as you start to use it for demonstration purposes you're a long way away from the screen and the sound becomes a BI issue. So then the microphone comes in and we had to buy a very expensive microphone, and then obviously the background is an issue. So we bought a green screen which I think we paid nearly two thousand dollars for. So we paid a huge amount of money for that first set up, a because people weren't really understanding what it what we wanted to use it for. So we probably over spent, but also because we didn't really know what we were doing. So I'll go to over the ZAC and he can talk about what we did for the trade show. Yeah, and what we did now is we because you can use an slur for your I guess we don't have to either. And what's happened now is is that at the time we were setting it up, two years ago, a year and a half ago, is that wouldn't for the the camera...

...that's focused on the demo area, you want to actually have some good optical components to the camera so it's not all optical zoo. Need some some physical zoom in there. And me, though, is a really good option that sets out there for doing podcasting and that kind of thing. That has an optical, very good optical component tree built into it. It's not too expensive and it's just really good quality. And as far as the webcams, you know the Logi, the log of Tech Webcams do a pretty good job. The only thing is you want to have the widest angle views is possible and those there's a lot of really good options out there with that for under two hundred dollars or so somewhere that neighborhood. And then with the mics, there's a lot of really good mikes out there. Yet he's a good Mike. There's a whole bunch of other kind of mics that are out there that do a really good job. And but I think more so but now, is that zoom integrates with all this stuff. Before we had to do it old school style and peacemail it all together and throw on software, get the software to work, and felt like working with windows back in the nine nine, you know. And but now it's because of how far we've become. You just plug it in at works and you know, that was it was also really interesting is that we talked about execution. Is You have to have backup, up, on backup, up on backup when you're doing something that's complicated. And we actually had two Microsoft computers and to apple computers. This company typically use as apple. We're both using apples right now, but I'm fine working with PC's just because of where I come from. Ill use anything really, and we had apples and PC's running all of our stuff. We had PC's in the boots, we had apples and PCS mixed up in the office and it worked fine because the software can work on everything. It's platform agnostic, which is wonderful, and so with everything is just starting to work very well together now. Yeah, so to to I think that. What we've discovered is that you need a good microphone, you need a good camera and you need good Internet connection. So if you've got those three things then you can live live string. Yes, was the Internet connection is going to make...

...a big difference obvious. So when you're running all this, you know the High Ras Video Huh. Well, with the trade show, that was our number my number one concern. So we were going to be running three simultaneous zoom sessions, including someone like myself and someone else from Australia, and they had to work for four days straight without a glitch. And I was so worried that that was almost an impossible task. And again I think a couple of views came man be it would have been, but because now people are aware that the need Internet is a is a mask. Really, the infrastructure is there and we just had one small glitch that lasted probably one know, about five minutes maybe. Also, zoom is really good at recovering from glitches, whereas older technology wasn't. We'd have to reboot and all that sort of stuff. So yeah, it was a it was really a great experience and we were really, really pleased with how good that the Internet connection was. Also there was very little lag access. Another big she that used to be a huge problem with live streaming is the lag. We had NILAGG attle, so not that you can see anyway. So it's pretty listened, half sticking. So yeah, it waits. It is than we did hope that it would. However, as with all good shows performances, is that it was all good systems. You have to pressure test the vessel way before you actually go to the show. So we had we set up our booth ahead of time and we lit everything up, turn on all of all the live feeds all up to eleven and let them run for a long period of time and we tested this, tested that and during that period of time we went through to computer blue. Okay, we had other ones in the wings, doesn't matter. Plug it in, load on the zoom everything else. When we can, we can change out of computer and about fifteen twenty minutes and you know, but you have to pressure test everything ahead of time because there's a lot of little mixing, cranious that we didn't think about. You know, communicating during the show and using as a message platform to interact with people at the booths and outside of just cell phone and just all these little things and we just had it done ahead of time so that when we went live we'd already made all the mistakes and we we'd already tested everything out and the things that we were worried about breaking we had backups for and they didn't break.

Oh yeah, things broke quite a lot and doesn't matter. Plug it in, keep going and you just have to have that mentality of just being prepared and having enough technical knowledge, both at the booth and also at the respective warehouses, to just kind of ev move and flow. But if you don't have to be a rocket, science and siding just because most people have become smarter about this stuff, more knowledgeable about all the stuff, and I think they will give themselves credit for I'm actually to that point. Zach. Remember the week before we were doing tests, factory lost the Internet. So someone cut through a cable somewhere. So for two and a half days on the week before the show, the place that we were going to do do most of the zooming from had no internet at all. So Zach race that and board a hot spot, entered a negotiation with one of the providers and we got up on the southern network and tested that at as well. So we were even prepared to operate without the let cat five Internet through the building because we experienced that during testing. So yeah, testing is really important, and it didn't matter. You can we pulled even the Internet that we had. The show was all through g four and five G and that's it. And that's where're at now. By G is making all this stuff possible anywhere. Good stuff, guys. Let's swing back around to kind of where we started, with trade shows. I'd be curious to hear you guys, are ahead of the curve here, but I'd like to hear your take on what's it going to look like when, in two thousand and twenty five or two thousand and twenty six, you know, say five years out, you're walking the know your back at fabtack, or maybe your claim you're still sitting in Australia streaming in. But what's what do you guys thinks going to be different in a post pandemic world, where we now live in this five g world, which will probably be six or seven you by then, and who knows? And you know, people are more accustomed to live streaming like not only that, but what else do you think is going to change in the years ahead and this trade show world. If I think the trade show industry is about undergo a huge revolution. So if you could imagine that every single exhibitor at...

...the show at the same technology as US, then they're going to start thinking, why do we need to actually go to a building? Why can't we hold a trade show remotely and not not actually go at all? So that's something I think trade show organizers need to think about. Is what facilities would they need to provide companies like us for the one or two people that do turn up where most of the trade show interaction is actually happening virtually? So I think it would be a very different set up. One of the things that I really don't like about trade shows is the waste. The amount of time and effort that's spent in building those stands for just a few days and then it's all thrown away at the end of the show is really quite heartbreaking, I think. So it's kind of an imperative, I think, that we find a better way of doing this. And the cost is just huge right now. So I also see the cost of doing trade shows reducing as people move more and more into a virtual world. What do you think, Zach, when you see it again? Yeah, and I definitely second that. I think. Well, we also saw at the shows is we had just as any vendors walking by just checking out what we're doing, including by the big guys, like the big, huge vendors that did not go to Baptech this year. They are people walk on the show and they were coma by. We talked to a couple as we were there. And next year I think that the big anchor companies are going to be seriously reducing the size of their booze and really leveraging the hybrid component of their booze so they can save money, because they spend literally millions of dollars pot and there's always a question of what you getting out of it and they quit. An answer is becoming very clear now. Not a lot of specially when you got a lot of alternatives to get just as much or more bang for your butt for a fraction of the cost. And that's where things are headed. But the trade show industries and the trade or organizers are resisting to the mail. You know there that this is kind of a neat little thing, but they're not helping a whole lot. It's up to do the vendors, it's up to the companies to just innovate in spite of everything else, and that that's how innovation really happens anyway. But that's where things are heading. Good stuff, guys.

Is there anything you'd like to add to this conversation that we have not touched on? I've thought about a whole approach to this. So obviously in match two thousand and twenty we had a crisis. And have we handled that as a company? And I think that we've taken a problem, a big problem, and turned into a solution. So I think the evil message for all BB companies, especially as I'm sure this's going to be still more changes that we going to be facing in the near future, is don't it problems take you down, but see if you can make problems part of a solution. So what we did is we took the great capability that people would developing in having to get onto doom, use Qi codes orso of stuff. We use that great capability that means had and turned it to our advantage and I'd really encourage small businesses to look at issues like that in the same way and to make problems work for you rather than than stop you, because what what that means is that US, as a smaller to midsize company, we were just as as well put together and put on a show, just as good as a lot of the other bigger, more well funded companies in a much smaller footprint, and that was there's a lot of kind of like whoa what, just like holy that this is totally possible. It's a lot of paradigm ships were happening as there are walked by and I I can't wait Fab technic UERE. It's going to be really interestingnacy. Yeah, absolutely awesome, guys. Well, I appreciate you doing this today. I want to give you a chance to talk about where people can learn about and see Tachen Tig Brash your product specifically, and where they can get in touch with you guys. So fire away. Lets say the number one foot of goals. The Guy to www dot bresscom and we've gotten just everything there on the website. Yeah, and to your point as well, we're ever will we have an office in a royal annoying fully stock warehouse. We don't have any issues with stock at all in Bilso have fully stock ware House and in Australia and we sell globally, so we're all over the place, but we really focus on part of also, what we were trying to do at the show is showing that...

...not only are we selling a product, that we're selling a solution or selling the support of that solution through innovative platforms and means, and that's in the BB space and in the the industrial space. Anybody can buy a product, but it's the company behind the product that people are really caring about and the people really buy, and we really take that seriously and it's working really well. So if you do send this to a willowting and you want to remove the heat, team coming to walk to us, because we can help you in also. It's of different ways. Fantastic. Well, once again, guys, I appreciate you doing this. I think this is a really interesting conversation and congratulate you guys for getting out ahead of the curve on the technology front here when it comes to you know, we're trade shows our head in and what you could do with live video streaming. I think it's really cool. So we're gonna get a lot of our listeners are going to get some value out of this. Thank you. Thanks very much for having us. It's been really great joking to you, you bet, and as for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episode of the manufacturing the executive. You've been listening to the manufacturing executive podcast? To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for be tob manufacturers at gorilla seventy sixcom learn thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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