The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 2 months ago

How to Innovate the Tired Trade Show Booth w/ Clive White & Zach Person

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

At the outset of the pandemic, trade shows were one of the many facets of business imperiled by the crisis.

But every crisis presents an opportunity for innovation.

And for today’s guests, Clive White, CEO, and Zach Person, General Manager, at Ensitech, a company that heavily relies on trade shows for garnering business, pushing past the initial pandemic panic ultimately paid off — fast forward to today, and they’ve revolutionized the trade show booth.

They join me to discuss:

- Their digital-analog hybrid trade show booth

- How they stayed well-prepared for the inevitable technological hurdles they knew they’d face

- How their innovative approach can be applied to other facets of business

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You can go in any best buyright now, spend about thousand bucks. You ever take by cameras, bylights, by everything you need, even green screens, and set it upand do it. Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore thestrategies and experiences that are driving midsize manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insightsfrom passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B tob sales and marketing experts about how to applyactionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcometo another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm Joe Sullivan, your host anda CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency Gorilla Seventy six. Over thelast year and a half since I launched this podcast, I've had a handfulof smart folks come on the show and talk about the power of video inour respective business environments. My guests have educated about video for marketing purposes andthen sales applications and even for more efficient and human internal communications. But I'vegot a new one for you today. About a month removed from Fabtech twothousand and twenty one at the time I'm recording this. The two guys thatyou're about to hear from will tell you how they flipped the typical unimaginative tradeshow booth on its head with the help of a really smart video strategy,specifically live streamed video right from their facility into McCormick place in Chicago. Payattention here, because these guys are a few years ahead of the curve,and I could promise you there are ideas you'll take away from what they're aboutto share. Let's get into it. ZAC person has spent his professional careeron locking with the revenue potential of global teams that manufacture and sell a varietyof metal fabricated products all over the world. He does this via the integration ofsystems, software and people, driven by clarity of vision, relentless implementationand process. The results have been turning...

...stagnation into acceleration and change into opportunity. Zach has launched products in thirty plus countries, currently specializing in the NorthAmerica region. He's built companies from conception to commercialization and reorganized and revitalized entiresales and marketing departments. This experience allows Zach to work shoulders shoulder with everyonefrom admin staff to process engineers to presidents and CEOS. His career spans theprivate and public sector, including consulting and entrepreneurship. He's held a number ofleadership roles, ranging from director of global business operations to Director of international salesto senior program manager. Zacher into BEA and marketing and a second PA inGerman, studies from Michigan State University. He currently lives in Chicago and enjoysgiving back to the community by mentoring young professionals and donating time to start upsand small businesses. Clive white is part engineer, part visionary. As ownerof ANCI tech and inventor of the TIG brush is electrical engineering expertise and passionfor the product are the lynchpin of Anti Tech Innovation, research and development.Working closely with experts in other areas, including industrial chemistry, Clive's unique perspectiveon the development and potential to take brush has been the driving force behind itsrapid success. A qualified electrical engineer, Clive previously held roles in sales forMotorola and developed software for on board automotive systems. Telecommunications and remuneration systems.Sack and Clive, welcome to the show. Thank you. Are doing good.Have you guys here and my business partner John, he made the introductionto us after he witnessed what he said was the most innovative trade show boothhe saw while walking the halls at fabtack. So congrats on that. First ofall. I thanks very much. So you know I've got a lotI want to cover with you guys here today. But tell her audience first, you know what was going through your heads as you entered two thousand andtwenty one and you thought about what your trade show strategy was going to be. In the first place, the part...

...that we might needs to be showingto customers. So customers need to basically see it to believe it. Soin the pandemic heats in March two thousand and twenty we had to cancel allour trade shows. So in two thousand and nineteen we went to sit intrade shows for the June and so we had to make a decision to cancelall the trade shows. So then we were left in this really strange placewhere we couldn't actually show our product to customers either. In trade shows orJEN visit customers. So we had to find a way of reaching that cat. So that's when we thought perhaps we could do something like a zoom asa way of connecting to our customers remotely. But the big problem was how canwe get our customers to actually see the products and but to try itfor themselves? So that was to be issue. Win The trade show Febte. It came up in two thousand and twenty one. We didn't really knowif it was going to go ahead. So it's the first trade show we'vereally been back to, and so we thought if we created a virtual environment, even if the trade show was canceled, we could basically s still carry onthe trade show anyway, but just do it remotely. So that's therewas the genesis of the idea. Got It, and so talk a littlebit about what you know what that implementation actually looked like. I got here'swhat I'll tell our listeners. You know my business partner John. He waskind of walking down the hall and and all of a sudden here's I don'tknow which one of you guys are. was Go hey, you and theybe in the blue girl is seventy six shirt and he kind of turns andlike this TV's talking at them right, and I think he just made theassumption there was a recorded video going on there like they're probably is on anumber of booths. But so to talk about what what your actual structure lookedlike and kind of how you guys have that set up? Well, Ithink I can. I'll I can jump in here a little bit because itto also give some additional background. Essentially, so our whole booth was virtual andreal life at the same time. So we had three zoom feeds goingall the time. We had a big giant larger than the live screen thatwas wented out into the crowd and that's where John was, and John's arein internal technical salesperson and it also technical support guy, but he's also awonderful personality and he does a really good...

...job oft just talking at people andhe actually helps do demos and he really did a good job of engaging peopleas they were walking by, because people are so used to seeing videos andit's just another talking head that's not going to talk to me, but willJohn just talk to him and brought them in and we had a mic andthey were talking to each other and engaging and talking, and then he woulddo a demo showing what we did and how things work, and then hewould just pass them on to us. We would then have a couple ofstations set up to where the customer could use our product, but then rightin front of them was another zoom session, one of three, where they gettalked to, climb or talk to another salesperson in and Clive, bythe way, was in Sydney, Australia at the time. We had othersales people that were in Aurora, Illinois at the time. They're all overthe place. They're only about two of US physically in the boot and butreally we had a whole stud of people in the boots supporting all these customersand we just feed him right in and and I would drop them off totalk to clive and they would do the demo on their own and I wouldgo talk to somebody else, and that's just how it kind of flowed.And people just first of all, we're taking away with it. They werequite unsure what they were seeing until all of a sudden they just fell intoa Oh, we're just talking to somebody on zoom, like we're doing forthe last year and a half and it just started working and it was justnormal talking to someone like that and just became very real, very normal veryquickly, and people like that. It was news interesting, it was inovativeand, you know, in a work really well. Yeah, you're rightit. I mean it is. It is just normal. We're doing itright now to record this podcast. We all do it probably multiple times aday at this point with people. Why not? Why? I use livestreaming video in in a trade show booth setting right. Yeah, it wasa little bit different, I guess, though, in that zoom is designedto go office to office, so we actually wanted to demonstrate our product topeople. So that's where it became a little bit more interesting, is tohow we set the booth up. So we decide we'd have a big mainscreen to basically stop people, and that's what John didn't he was really goodat that, including gorilla seventy six. And then we thought what do wedo with people once they're stopped? I...

...had we actually get them to trythe product out. So we thought there was going to be a bit ofa psychological barrier there because you're in front of a big screen and the guyyou know who's who's having up a little bit. How do you get someoneto leave that group and go across? So that's where we decide to havesome product on the on the actual booth itself to attract people. And thenthe issue was engaging with that person from the screen, from the zoom session, and that was really interesting. So because people have in their mind thatit's just a video happening. Even when we said hello to the customer,often they just thought that it was that point in the video where the personsaid hello to someone else and so, you know luck you'd wave to themand they'd wave back, but then they'd be embarrassed because they just waved toa video and it was actually really interesting trying to get people to to realizethat they were in a live engagement situation. So yeah, it had some interestingtving issues. But once we worked out where the bottom next, whereZAC, for example, did the introduction, so people would actually be introduced tothe remote presenter, and once they realized luck sex said what was happening, then all of a sudden it all clicked and they were fine with it. It's interesting how difficult it was for people to understand what it was thatwe'd actually done to start off with. So you had John's big had onscreen stopping people on their tracks. You had zach a live in person,actually bringing people over to a smaller screen where then somebody, also remote,was conducting a Damo, but your product was right their lives. That's rightexactly. That's super interesting. What would just out of curiosity, what madeyou guys decide those people should be remote rather than in person? Well,part of it was that we had to develop the capability ourselves anyway to beable to reach our customers. So we were already using a technology which wedeveloped really a year ago, and I suppose in one way it was itwas to try and stretch our capability to see if we could literally do thisat a trade show. And the other part of it is that we wantedto actually sell the concept of doing virtual demonstrations to our customers. So ourcustomers are reluctant to engage in a virtual...

...demo because they think they're just goingto be watching a video for an hour and everyone's power pointed to death.So to actually get people to realize that this is actually very engaging, veryinteractive and we will respond to their requests. It's not just going to be aspreaching to them, and so we wanted the Trade Shaw to showcase thatcapability to customers and I think he did that. What do you think that? Yeah, it worked really well and it was the biggest part of whatit loted to do. It allowed us to be more places at once,allowed us to bring resources to bear at the trade show no matter where theywere in the world, and it allows us to do and also, becausewe were broadcasting from our warehouse, we had everything in that warehouse. Ifwe had a customer come up and they wanted to use they were stick welland you got a need stick wells back there? Oh, yes, wedo. We got everything you need to just grab and you go, andso you don't have to bring as much stuff to the boot because it's allthe warehouse. It's all wherever we wanted to be, and work just fine. Yeah, it's I think it's really smart. A lot of good reasonsto have done this. I mean, less people to send there, youcan show more stuff from a distance and I, like are you guys,used it as as a sort of showcase. Hey, hey, customers, lookwhat we could do remotely. Right. Yeah, it was also leavaging people'snew familiarity with zoom and we also had a QC hade, so peopleused to using q codes to now. So we had a qcode next tothe screen that they could skin with their phone and it would take them tolanding page, so they could instead of taking a brochure with them, apaper pressure, they could literally take it away in their fine and we hada whole lot of stuff in their tuningcluding the possibility to book a lot ofdemo later after the show. So we put a lot of food into that, what we call the landing page that customers could take away with him.And then that also ended up working really well, because often people will takea paper brochure and it gets lost, but because this was in their phone, it was was something that they could use to contact us later or thatwe can contact them. So is this, is this a strategy you plan toreplicate then, having done it both live and and in this sort ofmore technological remote way, something you're going...

...to do again? Yeah, absolutely, I think so. One Way to visualize is that we've created a virtualworld in the trade show and we've invited people into that virtual world. Soonce you've got people to understand that as a concept, we can expose themto a lot of different experiences in that virtual world. So we can connectthem with other customers, we can kick them with experts, we can showthem products, we can show them videos if they want to see a video, we can show them technical documentation and we can do it very fast becausealready set up and they can walk away from the booth after a couple ofminutes with a lot of different experiences that would normally take a long time toshow them. So I think it really works in especially in the trade showsetting. Yeah, it's great. So I'll shift gears here and talk moreabout this concept of live streaming because you know, frankly, trade shows arejust one application for doing something like this, and you guys, I think Kudosto you for figuring out how to make that work. And we've gotteninto this already. The whole worlds used to talking on zoom and I thinkthat opens up a lot of possibilities that really people wouldn't have even thought aboutin eighteen months ago, frankly. So, and I guess as a result ofthis, the infrastructure for a live stream he was as stronger and you'rebecoming stronger, at least to support, you know, the required bandwidth andjust technology required to do this. So I am just curious to hear youguys talk about what other applications, what other ways are you using live streamingin your business right now, everywhere? I mean it's really because part ofwhat we're getting to the clives point proof a concept and also to gain trustin the idea, in the concept that they can just as long as theyhave a nice big screen. They can log in by a zoom. Theydon't. It's nice if they have a video camera to so we can lookat each other talk to each other, but they don't necessarily have to havethat because we've got the whole set up and they can just beam in andthen talk to us and we can. They have to be able to seethat they can see everything because we have the two camera setup, so theycan see a closed they can see far away, and then because they weasked them, well, what are you doing? What are you well doingwhen you're working with we have everything there and then, therefore, they canfeel comfortable with letting a show everything and...

...it shortens the sales cycle in termsof now the instead of, you know, two miles away, now they're aboutmaybe, you know, ten feet, and they just need to talk toeach other and have a few more conversations, you know, dial itinto their specific application and then just buy. You know, that's where we're atright now, and people got more comfortable that kind of thing over thelast year and a half. We were just really leveraging that change, becausethat's we're at very unique point in time in history where people are open tothis idea. This would have never been able to happen two years ago.The things that we using it in gentally as well. So we holding weekthe stuff training says where we will send your training. That stuff can remoteremote into and we've got an office in the US as well as one inAustralia, so we use this capability to stay connected. We can also dorepairs, and this is actually a really interesting thing that came out quite earlyon where a customer I had to repair that they were trying to do andcouldn't work out to do something, so we did a live stream with themand actually showed them how to do the repair. So yes, it's actuallyended up being very versatile and I think we still discovering new ways of usingit. That's great. You know, let's brainstorm for here for a fewminutes. What else could a manufacturer you know, how else could they doit? Like here's here's one I heard. I've seen this example actually play outfor a client of ours, where they said, well, we've gotthis big product, this thing that sits, it's bigger than a human being,it's it's on a shop floor. Can't bring it with us and youshow it to people, like yeah, maybe at a trade show, willonce or twice a year or whatever, but why not, rather than settingup a phone call for a sales call or, you know, even azoom call where they're sitting in an office? Why, you know, if youhad the right technology in place, why not just conduct your your live, you know, consultations or calls with prospects right there from the shop floorwhere you're right in front of this thing, you could show it to them.So, you know, I like, I would love to see more ofthat kind of thing going on. I think people are just intimidated bythe technology. But like, what else? What else do you guys think manufacturershould be thinking about in terms of...

...using live streaming at maybe they're not. Well, I'm just carrying on from what you're saying. Back in thes they came out with a video phone and it had a little tiny screenand the idea was that you could you could call someone and see them andit didn't work at all. But I think nowadays, with the technology thatwe've got, could be literally set the company where every single person in thecompany has a came around a microphone and when a customer rings that, wecan literally zoom them instead of answering the call. So that's introduces some reallyinteresting issues. That zoom hasn't continued yet. So how do you transfer a zoomcall from one person to another? That doesn't exist yet. How couldwe transfer someone to a zoom session in, you know, like I lived,my room and then have them transferred back so that we can continue theconversation with them? So there are there is still some technology to be developedthere, but we have literally set our whole company so every single person isprepared to zoom any time with customers or with other employees. So again thatscenario, I think that you could definitely use more but I just taking uson a thought experiment. which is this idea of online sales, which haveobviously taken off during the pandemic. The big problem with online sales is youhave to buy something that you haven't seen or tried. So people have totrust the vendor and so vendors reduce that risk BOT offering money back, guaranteesand stuff, which doesn't always work. So what people tend to do isthey go to a shop, try stuff out for themselves and then go onlineto buy it. So the shopkeeper has to be in time with the customerbut then doesn't spend the money with him, he spends it with someone else.So I think this he's a perfect way to beach that cap. Soshop keep it can have a virtual shop where customers can actually talk to themabout what it is that they want. The shop keep it can show themwhat they have and close the transaction there and then, without the person leavingand then buying someone else. So I think it's going to really find itsniche in that. I know what did you call it? EXACT ECOMMERCE hybridmodel. Yeah, so we think there's a huge cap there that these couldfill. The talk of technology. Yeah,...

...that's really smart and I think andto add onto that and also to further touch on the point or thequestion you have to love it earlier, is that what should companies think about? And the number one thing we took away from all this is that itis a hundred percent possible using off the shelf equipment. You can go intoany best buy right now, spend about thousand bucks you ever take by cameras, by lights, by everything you need, even green screens, and set itup and do it and zoom. Everybody knows how to zoom. Everybodyknows how to use the Webcam and you know, we actually use the thirdparty open source piece of software that allows us to use multicamera point angles ofreal time during the zooms. And but zoom is also getting better and betterwith time, and now you can actually put power point presentations in the greenscreen right behind you. Can you can plug in that way. So there'sa lot of stuff that's happening that if you can't figure out yourself, dowhat everybody else do. It's just go to go to youtube and there's abillion people that have done it and it's a hundred percent possible, and Ithink that's what people that's what people were so amazed at is that? HolyMolly, these guys did it and and again. We keep on reiterating everything. Everything that's in this booths is the same stuff that's in your house.Mostly. Yeah, I think it's great, good for you guys. So peopleare, I need even tid nail, by their imagination, because the technology'sis to the price point where any of us can be a TV station. So we can do the whole thing that a TV station can do,which is just really mind bubbling. I don't think this would have been possibleeven a year and a half ago, but technology has come down in priceand the capability has increased to such an extent that yes, a foodabile forJustbreit, anyone in business to yet to buy this technology and set up.But it's the imagination. I think that's the issue right now, people beingable to get over that hurdle of achieve seeing the possibilities and then exploring it. Let's get a little bit into the weeds on the technology. For Anybodywho's sitting here listening thinking cheese. I would love to start doing the sumof the stuff, but like, where do I even start? You know, I think it's fair to say you don't need a professional videographer and Houseor Hollywood production studio these days, as...

...you've been communicating that, but there'sstill some investments you want to make, probably so that you know it's betterthan the I don't know that the Webcam is built in your Mac which,frank these garbage as I've found, and extra hundred twenty dollars for the Webcam, I'm music now makes a big difference. But you can step it up anotherlevel of if you really want to and still not break the bank.So I'm just curious, from camera to audio, to lighting to, youknow, green screen or background like, what's the stuff that you guys havefound is really worth investing in so that you can go from, you know, feeling like just you picked up your and Raider iphone and turned on thevideo to like you really feeling kind of a a little more professional. Itwill initially was just on EZAC before about this. The first time we didthis was in March two thousand and twenty, when we realized that we had totry and find a different way of connecting to customers. So we hadno idea what we were doing. So we just went out to the localCHEMERA STORE AND CANADA DIS released their La is then fifty and everyone was sayingit was very cheap for its capability. So we grabbed that. We triedto plug the into zoom and it didn't work at all. So then itwas trying to work ahead. It connected through the zoom, so we searchedaround for software and fans software we could use, but then the sound wasno good. So you don't realize when you're talking to a computer at adesk at close you are, but as soon as you start to use itfor demonstration purposes you're a long way away from the screen and the sound becomesa BI issue. So then the microphone comes in and we had to buya very expensive microphone, and then obviously the background is an issue. Sowe bought a green screen which I think we paid nearly two thousand dollars for. So we paid a huge amount of money for that first set up,a because people weren't really understanding what it what we wanted to use it for. So we probably over spent, but also because we didn't really know whatwe were doing. So I'll go to over the ZAC and he can talkabout what we did for the trade show. Yeah, and what we did nowis we because you can use an slur for your I guess we don'thave to either. And what's happened now is is that at the time wewere setting it up, two years ago, a year and a half ago,is that wouldn't for the the camera...

...that's focused on the demo area,you want to actually have some good optical components to the camera so it's notall optical zoo. Need some some physical zoom in there. And me,though, is a really good option that sets out there for doing podcasting andthat kind of thing. That has an optical, very good optical component treebuilt into it. It's not too expensive and it's just really good quality.And as far as the webcams, you know the Logi, the log ofTech Webcams do a pretty good job. The only thing is you want tohave the widest angle views is possible and those there's a lot of really goodoptions out there with that for under two hundred dollars or so somewhere that neighborhood. And then with the mics, there's a lot of really good mikes outthere. Yet he's a good Mike. There's a whole bunch of other kindof mics that are out there that do a really good job. And butI think more so but now, is that zoom integrates with all this stuff. Before we had to do it old school style and peacemail it all togetherand throw on software, get the software to work, and felt like workingwith windows back in the nine nine, you know. And but now it'sbecause of how far we've become. You just plug it in at works andyou know, that was it was also really interesting is that we talked aboutexecution. Is You have to have backup, up, on backup, up onbackup when you're doing something that's complicated. And we actually had two Microsoft computersand to apple computers. This company typically use as apple. We're bothusing apples right now, but I'm fine working with PC's just because of whereI come from. Ill use anything really, and we had apples and PC's runningall of our stuff. We had PC's in the boots, we hadapples and PCS mixed up in the office and it worked fine because the softwarecan work on everything. It's platform agnostic, which is wonderful, and so witheverything is just starting to work very well together now. Yeah, soto to I think that. What we've discovered is that you need a goodmicrophone, you need a good camera and you need good Internet connection. Soif you've got those three things then you can live live string. Yes,was the Internet connection is going to make...

...a big difference obvious. So whenyou're running all this, you know the High Ras Video Huh. Well,with the trade show, that was our number my number one concern. Sowe were going to be running three simultaneous zoom sessions, including someone like myselfand someone else from Australia, and they had to work for four days straightwithout a glitch. And I was so worried that that was almost an impossibletask. And again I think a couple of views came man be it wouldhave been, but because now people are aware that the need Internet is ais a mask. Really, the infrastructure is there and we just had onesmall glitch that lasted probably one know, about five minutes maybe. Also,zoom is really good at recovering from glitches, whereas older technology wasn't. We'd haveto reboot and all that sort of stuff. So yeah, it wasa it was really a great experience and we were really, really pleased withhow good that the Internet connection was. Also there was very little lag access. Another big she that used to be a huge problem with live streaming isthe lag. We had NILAGG attle, so not that you can see anyway. So it's pretty listened, half sticking. So yeah, it waits. Itis than we did hope that it would. However, as with allgood shows performances, is that it was all good systems. You have topressure test the vessel way before you actually go to the show. So wehad we set up our booth ahead of time and we lit everything up,turn on all of all the live feeds all up to eleven and let themrun for a long period of time and we tested this, tested that andduring that period of time we went through to computer blue. Okay, wehad other ones in the wings, doesn't matter. Plug it in, loadon the zoom everything else. When we can, we can change out ofcomputer and about fifteen twenty minutes and you know, but you have to pressuretest everything ahead of time because there's a lot of little mixing, cranious thatwe didn't think about. You know, communicating during the show and using asa message platform to interact with people at the booths and outside of just cellphone and just all these little things and we just had it done ahead oftime so that when we went live we'd already made all the mistakes and wewe'd already tested everything out and the things that we were worried about breaking wehad backups for and they didn't break.

Oh yeah, things broke quite alot and doesn't matter. Plug it in, keep going and you just have tohave that mentality of just being prepared and having enough technical knowledge, bothat the booth and also at the respective warehouses, to just kind of evmove and flow. But if you don't have to be a rocket, scienceand siding just because most people have become smarter about this stuff, more knowledgeableabout all the stuff, and I think they will give themselves credit for I'mactually to that point. Zach. Remember the week before we were doing tests, factory lost the Internet. So someone cut through a cable somewhere. Sofor two and a half days on the week before the show, the placethat we were going to do do most of the zooming from had no internetat all. So Zach race that and board a hot spot, entered anegotiation with one of the providers and we got up on the southern network andtested that at as well. So we were even prepared to operate without thelet cat five Internet through the building because we experienced that during testing. Soyeah, testing is really important, and it didn't matter. You can wepulled even the Internet that we had. The show was all through g fourand five G and that's it. And that's where're at now. By Gis making all this stuff possible anywhere. Good stuff, guys. Let's swingback around to kind of where we started, with trade shows. I'd be curiousto hear you guys, are ahead of the curve here, but I'dlike to hear your take on what's it going to look like when, intwo thousand and twenty five or two thousand and twenty six, you know,say five years out, you're walking the know your back at fabtack, ormaybe your claim you're still sitting in Australia streaming in. But what's what doyou guys thinks going to be different in a post pandemic world, where wenow live in this five g world, which will probably be six or sevenyou by then, and who knows? And you know, people are moreaccustomed to live streaming like not only that, but what else do you think isgoing to change in the years ahead and this trade show world. IfI think the trade show industry is about undergo a huge revolution. So ifyou could imagine that every single exhibitor at...

...the show at the same technology asUS, then they're going to start thinking, why do we need to actually goto a building? Why can't we hold a trade show remotely and notnot actually go at all? So that's something I think trade show organizers needto think about. Is what facilities would they need to provide companies like usfor the one or two people that do turn up where most of the tradeshow interaction is actually happening virtually? So I think it would be a verydifferent set up. One of the things that I really don't like about tradeshows is the waste. The amount of time and effort that's spent in buildingthose stands for just a few days and then it's all thrown away at theend of the show is really quite heartbreaking, I think. So it's kind ofan imperative, I think, that we find a better way of doingthis. And the cost is just huge right now. So I also seethe cost of doing trade shows reducing as people move more and more into avirtual world. What do you think, Zach, when you see it again? Yeah, and I definitely second that. I think. Well, we alsosaw at the shows is we had just as any vendors walking by justchecking out what we're doing, including by the big guys, like the big, huge vendors that did not go to Baptech this year. They are peoplewalk on the show and they were coma by. We talked to a coupleas we were there. And next year I think that the big anchor companiesare going to be seriously reducing the size of their booze and really leveraging thehybrid component of their booze so they can save money, because they spend literallymillions of dollars pot and there's always a question of what you getting out ofit and they quit. An answer is becoming very clear now. Not alot of specially when you got a lot of alternatives to get just as muchor more bang for your butt for a fraction of the cost. And that'swhere things are headed. But the trade show industries and the trade or organizersare resisting to the mail. You know there that this is kind of aneat little thing, but they're not helping a whole lot. It's up todo the vendors, it's up to the companies to just innovate in spite ofeverything else, and that that's how innovation really happens anyway. But that's wherethings are heading. Good stuff, guys.

Is there anything you'd like to addto this conversation that we have not touched on? I've thought about awhole approach to this. So obviously in match two thousand and twenty we hada crisis. And have we handled that as a company? And I thinkthat we've taken a problem, a big problem, and turned into a solution. So I think the evil message for all BB companies, especially as I'msure this's going to be still more changes that we going to be facing inthe near future, is don't it problems take you down, but see ifyou can make problems part of a solution. So what we did is we tookthe great capability that people would developing in having to get onto doom,use Qi codes orso of stuff. We use that great capability that means hadand turned it to our advantage and I'd really encourage small businesses to look atissues like that in the same way and to make problems work for you ratherthan than stop you, because what what that means is that US, asa smaller to midsize company, we were just as as well put together andput on a show, just as good as a lot of the other bigger, more well funded companies in a much smaller footprint, and that was there'sa lot of kind of like whoa what, just like holy that this is totallypossible. It's a lot of paradigm ships were happening as there are walkedby and I I can't wait Fab technic UERE. It's going to be reallyinterestingnacy. Yeah, absolutely awesome, guys. Well, I appreciate you doing thistoday. I want to give you a chance to talk about where peoplecan learn about and see Tachen Tig Brash your product specifically, and where theycan get in touch with you guys. So fire away. Lets say thenumber one foot of goals. The Guy to www dot bresscom and we've gottenjust everything there on the website. Yeah, and to your point as well,we're ever will we have an office in a royal annoying fully stock warehouse. We don't have any issues with stock at all in Bilso have fully stockware House and in Australia and we sell globally, so we're all over theplace, but we really focus on part of also, what we were tryingto do at the show is showing that...

...not only are we selling a product, that we're selling a solution or selling the support of that solution through innovativeplatforms and means, and that's in the BB space and in the the industrialspace. Anybody can buy a product, but it's the company behind the productthat people are really caring about and the people really buy, and we reallytake that seriously and it's working really well. So if you do send this toa willowting and you want to remove the heat, team coming to walkto us, because we can help you in also. It's of different ways. Fantastic. Well, once again, guys, I appreciate you doing this. I think this is a really interesting conversation and congratulate you guys for gettingout ahead of the curve on the technology front here when it comes to youknow, we're trade shows our head in and what you could do with livevideo streaming. I think it's really cool. So we're gonna get a lot ofour listeners are going to get some value out of this. Thank you. Thanks very much for having us. It's been really great joking to you, you bet, and as for the rest of you, I hope tocatch you on the next episode of the manufacturing the executive. You've been listeningto the manufacturing executive podcast? To ensure that you never miss an episode,subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an ever expanding collection ofarticles, videos, guides and tools specifically for be tob manufacturers at gorilla seventysixcom learn thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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