The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 2 weeks ago

How to Innovate the Tired Trade Show Booth w/ Clive White & Zach Person

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

At the outset of the pandemic, trade shows were one of the many facets of business imperiled by the crisis.

But every crisis presents an opportunity for innovation.

And for today’s guests, Clive White, CEO, and Zach Person, General Manager, at Ensitech, a company that heavily relies on trade shows for garnering business, pushing past the initial pandemic panic ultimately paid off — fast forward to today, and they’ve revolutionized the trade show booth.

They join me to discuss:

- Their digital-analog hybrid trade show booth

- How they stayed well-prepared for the inevitable technological hurdles they knew they’d face

- How their innovative approach can be applied to other facets of business

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You can go into any best by right nowspend about a thousand bucks you ever take by cameras by lights by everythingyou need give a green screens and set up, and do it welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here. You'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles, and you will learn from B to B sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get into the show, welcome to another episode of theManufacturing Executive Podcast, I'm Joe Sullivan your host and a Co founderof the Industrial Marketing Agency Gorilla. Seventy six over the last yearand a half since I launched this podcast I've had a handful of smartfolks, come on the show and talk about the power of video and our respectivebusiness environments. My guess have educated about video for marketingpurposes and in sales applications and even for more efficient and humaninternal communications. But I've got a new one for you today about a monthremoved from Fab Tack, Two Thousand and twenty one at the time. I'm recordingthis. The two guys that you're about to hear from will tell you how theyflipped the typical, unimaginative trade show booth on its head, with thehelp of a really smart video strategy. Specifically live streamed video rightfrom their facility into McCormick place in Chicago pay attention here,because these guys are a few years ahead of the curve, and I can promiseyou there are ideas you'll take away from what they're about to share. Let'sget into it. Zack person has spent his professional career on locking with therevenue potential of global teams that manufacture and sell a variety of metalfabricated products all over the world. He does this via the integration ofsystems, software and people, driven by...

...clarity of vision, relentlessimplementation and process. The results have been turning stagnation intoacceleration and change into opportunity. Zack is launched productsin thirty plus countries currently specializing in the North Americaregion, he's built companies from conception to commercialization andreorganized and revitalized entire sales and marketing departments. Thisexperience allows Zack to work shoulder to shoulder with everyone fromadminster to process engineers to presidents and CEOS his career spans.The private and public sector, including consulting andentrepreneurship, Hes held a number of leadership roles ranging from directorof global business operations to Director of international sales, tosenior program manager Zachar and to BA and marketing, and a second PA inGerman studies from Michigan State University. He currently lives inChicago and enjoys giving back to the community by mentoring, youngprofessionals and donating time to start ups and small businesses. Clivewhite is part engineer, part visionary as owner of NST. An inventor of the TIGbrush is electrical engineering, expertise and passion for the product.Are the Lynch pin of entite innovation, research and development workingclosely with experts in other areas, including industrial chemistry, Clabunique perspective on the development and potential to take brush, has beenthe driving force behind its rapid success? A qualified electricalengineer clive previously held rolls in sales for Motorola and developedsoftware for on board automotive systems, telecommunications andremuneration systems, sack and clive. Welcome to the show. Thank you. I do itgood to have you guys here and my business partner John. He made theintroduction to us after he witnessed what he said was the most innovativetrade show booth. He saw while walking the halls of Faba so congrats on that.First of all, I think very much so you know I've got a lot of want to coverwith you guys here today, but tell her audience first, you know what was goingthrough your heads as you entered two thousand and twenty one, and youthought about what your trade show strategy was going to be in the firstplace. The part that we made needs to...

...be shame to customers, so customersneed to basically see it to believe it. So in the pandemic heat in March, twothousand and twenty we had to cancel all our trade shows. So in two thousandand nineteen we went to thirtie shows for the junior year, and so we had tomake a decision to cancel all the trade shows. So then we were left in thisreally strange place where we couldn't actually show our product to customerseither in trade shows or Jane visit customers. So we had to find a way ofbitching that gap. So that's when we thought perhaps we could do somethinglike a zoo as a way of connecting to our customers remotely, but the bigproblem was: How can we get a customers to actually see the products and but totry it for themselves? So that was to be issue win? The trade show Cadet cameup in two thousand and twenty one. We didn't really know if it was going togo ahead. So it's the first trade show we've really been back too, and so wethought if we created a virtual environment, even if the trade show wascanceled, we could basicallyy still carry on the trade show anyway, butjust do it remotely. So that's there was the genesis of the idea, got it andso talk a little bit about what you know what that implementation actuallylooked like I get here's. What I'll tell e lesters you know my businesspartner, John. He was kind of just walking down the hall and and all of asudden he hears. I don't know which one of you guys. It was go, hey you and thethen the blue girl is seventy six shirt and he kind of turns and like this TV'stalking at him right- and I think he just made the assumption there was arecorded video going on there like there probably is on a number of booths,but so talk about what what your actual structure looked like and kind of howyou guys had that set up. Well, I think I get. I can jump in here a little bitbecause I also give some additional background. Essentially, so our wholebooth was virtual and real life at the same time, so we had three zoom feedsgoing all the time we had a big giant large on the live screen that waspointed out into the crowd, and that's where John Wasn't. God John's areinternal technical sales person and it also technical support guy but he'salso a wonderful personality and he...

...does a really good job at just talkingat people, and he actually always do demos, and he really did a good job ofengaging people as they were walking by, because people are so used to seeingvideos- and it's just another talking head. That's not going to talk to me,but well. John just talked to him and brought him in and we had a mike andthey were talking to each other and an engaging and talking, and then he woulddo it demo showing what we did and how things work and then he would just passthem on to us. So we would then have a couple of stations set up to where thecustomer could use our product, but then right in front of them was anotherzoom session, one of three where they could talk to climb or talk to anothersales person in the clad by the way was in send Australia. At the time we hadother sales people that were in Aurora Illinois at the time, they're all overthe place, the only bout two of US physically in the boot and but reallywe had a whole stew of people in the boo supporting all these customers, andwe just feed him right in and I would drop them off to talk to five and theywould do the demo on their own, and I would go and talk to somebody else andthat's just how it kind of lode and people, just first of all, were takenaway with they weren't quite unsure what they were seeing until all of asudden. They just fell into a Oh we're just talking to somebody on zoom likethe doing for the last year and a half, and it just started working, and it wasjust normal talking to somebody like that, and just became very, very normal,very quickly and people like that. It was news interesting, it was innovativeand you know it at work really well yeah you're right I mean it is. It isjust normal. We're doing it right now to record this podcast. We all do itprobably multiple times a day at this point with with people. Why not? Whynot use live streaming? Video in in a trade show boot setting right yeah. Itwas a little bit different. I guess, though, in that Junis designed to gooffice office, so we actually wanted to demonstrate a product to people. Sothat's where it became a little bit more interesting as to how he set thethe booth up. So we decided we'd have a big main screen to to basically stoppeople and that's what John did- and he was really good at that, including agrill, seventy six and then we thought...

...what do we do with people once theystopped? I, how do we actually get them to try the product out, so we thoughtthere was going to be a bit of a psychological barrier there becauseyou're in front of a big screen and there's a guy. You know who's hangingup at a little bit. How do you get someone to leave that group and goacross? So that's where we decide to have some product on the on the actualbooth itself to attract people? And then the issue was engaging with thatperson from the screen from the zoom session, and that was reallyinteresting so because people have it in their mind that there's just a videohappening, even when we said hello to the customer, often they just thoughtthat there was that point in the video where the person said hello to someoneelse, and so you know luck, he'd waved to them and they gave back. But thenthey'd be embarrassed because they just waved to a video, and it was actuallyreally interesting trying to get people to realize that they were in a liveengagement situation so yeah I had some interesting Tavin issues, but once weworked out where the Bonier sack, for example, did the introduction, sopeople would would actually be introduced to the remote presenter andonce they realized like sex, said what was happening then, all of a sudden, itall clicked, and they were fine with it. It's interesting how difficult it wasfor people to understand what it was that we'd actually done to start offwet, so he had John's big head on screen stopping people in their tracks.You had zack in live in person, actually bringing people over to asmaller screen. Where then, somebody also remote was conducting a demo, butyour product was right. There live that's right, exactly! That's superinteresting. What just out of curiosity? What made you guys decide? Those peopleshould be remote rather than in person. What part of it was that we had todevelop his capability ourselves anyway to be able to reach our customers? Sowe were already using the technology which we developed really a year ago,and I suppose in one way it was. It was to try and stretch a Copini to see ifwe could literally do this or the trade track, and the other part of it is thatwe wanted to actually sell the concept of doing virtual demonstrations to ourcustomers. So our custom is a reluctant to engagein a virtual demo because theythink they're just going to be watching...

...a video for an hour and everyone'spower pointed to death, so to actually get people to realize that this isactually very engaging, very interactive and we will respond to therequests. It's not just going to be as preaching to them, and so we wanted thetrade theater showcase that capability to customers, and I think I did that.What do you think tact yeah? It worked really well and it was what the biggestpart of what it lots to do. Allow us to be more places at once. Allowed us tobring resources to bear at the trade show, no matter where they were in theworld, and it allows us to do and also because we were broadcasting from ourwarehouse. We had everything in that warehouse if we had a customer to comeup and they wanted to use the we're, stick. Well, an you got these stickwells back there out. Yes, we do. We got everything, you need, you just grabit and you go, and so you don't have to bring as much stuff to the boot,because it's all at the warehouse is all wherever you wanted to be and workjust fine yeah. It's. I think it's really smart, a lot of good reasons tohave done this. I mean less people to send there. You can show more stufffrom a distance, and I, like you, guys, used it as as a sort of show case: Hey,hey customers, look what we can do remotely right. Yeah Wes, also LevainPeople's new familiarity with doom, and we also had a Quauco, so people areused to using quoest. So we had a quod next to the screen that they could scanwith their phone. They were taken to a landing page, so they could instead oftaking a brasure with them a paper Brosher. They could literally take itaway in their thing and we had a whole a OT stuff in there to induing thepossibility to book a lot of demo later after the show. So we put a lot of fallinto that. What we call the landing page that customers could take awaywith him and then actually also ended up working really well, because oftenpeople will take a paper bracer and it gets lost, but because this was intheir fane, it was was something that they could use to contact us later. Allthat we can contact them. So is this: Is this a strategy you plan toreplicate, then, having done it both live and and in this sort of moretechnological remote way, something...

...you're going to do again? Yep,absolutely, I think so. One Way to visualize it is that we've created avirtual world in the trade town and we've invited people into that victualworld. So once you've got people to understand that as a concept, we canexpose them to a lot of different experiences in that virtual world. Sowe can connect them with other customers. We can kick them withexperts. We can show them how lack we can show them videos if they want tosee a video, we can show them technical documentation, and we can do it veryfast because I already set up and they can walk away from the bees after acouple of minutes, with a lot of different experiences. That wouldnormally take a long time to show them say I think it really works, especiallythe trade show, setting yeah it's great. So let's shift gears here and talk moreabout this concept of live streaming because you know, frankly, trade showsare just one application for doing something like this, and you guys, Ithink, Kudos to you for figuring out how to make that work and we've gotteninto this already the whole world's used to talking on zoom, and I thinkthat opens up a lot of possibilities that really people wouldn't have eventhought about eighteen months ago. Frankly, so, and then I guess as aresult of this, the infrastructure for live streamings als, also stronger andyou're, becoming stronger, at least to support. You know the required bandwith, and just technology required to do this. So I am just curious to hearyou guys talk about what other applications. What other ways are youusing live streaming in your business right now everywhere I mean it's reallybecause part of what we're the getting to decline. The point prove a conceptand also to gain trust in the idea and the concept that they can just long asthey have a nice big screen. They can log in by a zoom. They don't it's niceif they have a the video camera to so we can look at each other talk to eachother, but they don't necessarily have to have that, because we've got thewhole set up and they can just beam in and then talk to us, and we can. Theyhave to be able to see that they can see everything because they have. Thetwo camera set up to Le can see up close. They can see far away and thenbecause we asked him well, what are you doing where you welling, where youworking with? We have everything there and then, therefore they can feelcomfortable with letting it show...

...everything and it shortens the salecycle in terms of now. Instead of you know two miles away now, they're about,maybe you know ten feet and they just need to talk to each other and have afew more conversations. You know dial into their specific application andthey just buy. You know that's where we're at right now and people got morecomfortable, that kind of thing. Over the last year and a half, we were justreally leveraging that changes, because that's we're at a very unique point intime in history, where people are open to this idea. This would never beenable to happen two years ago, the things that were using it internally aswell, so we holding with the staff training sessions where we will set ourtraining that stuff can remote remote into how we've got an office in the US,as well as one in Australia. So we use this capability to stay connected. Wecan also do repairs, and this is actually a really interesting thingthat came out quite early on where a customer head a repair that they weretrying to do and couldn't work out to do something. So we did a live streamwith them and t actually showed them how to do the repair. So, yes, it'sactually ended up being very versatile and I think we're still discovering newways of using it. That's great! Well, you know, let's brain storm, for youfor a few minutes. What what else could a manufacturer? You know? How elsecould they do it? Like he's here's one, I heard I've seen this example actuallyplay out for a client of ours where they said well, we've got this bigproduct. This thing that sits it's bigger than a human being. It sits on ashop floor, can't bring it with us and you now show it to people like yeah.Maybe I had a trade show once or twice a year or whatever, but why not? Ratherthan setting up a phone call for a sales call or a you know, even a zoomcall er they're sitting in an office. Why? You know if you had the righttechnology in place? Why not just conduct your live consultations orcalls with prospects right there from the shop floor where you're right infront of this thing and you could show it to them. So you know I like. I wouldlove to see more of that kind of thing going on. I think people are justintimidated by the technology, but like what else? What else do you guys thinkmanufacturers should be thinking about...

...in terms of you now using livestreaming that maybe they're not, but I'm just carrying on from what you'resaying back in the s they came out with a video fane and I had a little tinyscreen and the ID was that you could. You could call someone and see them andit didn't work at all, but I think nowadays, with the technology thatwe've got could be literally set a company where every single person inthe company has a camera and a microphone and win customer rings thatwe can literally Zome them instead of answering the call. So that'sintroduces some really interesting issues that zoom hasn't continued yetso how do you transfer as in cal from one person to another that doesn't needto yet he could we transfer someone to assume session in you know like a love,Demario and then have some transferred back so that we can continue theconversation with them. So there are. There is still some technology to bedeveloped there, but we have literally set for whole compan, so every singleperson is prepared to zoom any time with customers or with other employees.So again that scenario, I think that you could definitely use more, but Ijust taking a son, a thord experiment, which is this idea of online sales,which have obviously taken off during the pandemic. The big problem withonline sales, if you have to buy something that you haven't seen ortried, so people have to trust the vender and so vendors reduce that risk.Proffering may back guarantees and stuff which doesn't always work. Sowhat people tend to do is they go to a shop, try stuff at themselves and thengo online to buy it, so the shopkeeper has to spend time with a customer whoin doesn't spend the money with him. He spends it with someone else. So I thinkthis is a perfect way to beat that cat, so shop keepin can have a virtual shopwhere customers can actually talk to them about what it is that they want.The shopkeeper can show them what they have and close the transaction thereand then without the person leaving and then buying someone else, so I thinkit's going to really find its niche. In that I know what did you call it back?Ye Camera Hybrid Model Yeah, so we think there's a huge gap there thatthis could fill this type of technology...

...yeah. That's really smart and I think,and to add onto that, and also to further touch on the point. The thequestion you as love earlier is that what could companies think about andthe number one thing we took away from all this is that it is a hundredpercent possible using off to shelf equipment. You can go in any best byright now spend about a thousand bucks you ever take by cameras by light byeverything you need, give a green screens and set up and do it and zoomeverybody knows how to zoom. Everybody knows how to use the Web Cam, and youknow we actually use a third party open source thesus software that allows usto use multi camera angles a real time during the zooms and but zoom is alsogetting better and better with time, and now you can actually put parponpresentations in the green screen right behind you. Can you can plug in thatway? So there's a lot of stuff. That's happening that if you can't figure outyourself you what everybody else do it's just go to go to youtube andthere's a billion people that have done it and it's a hundred percent possible,and I think that's what people that's what people were so amazed at is thatHoly Moly? These guys did it, and and again we keep on reiterating evereseverything. That's in this booth is the same stuff. That's in your house,mostly yeah. I think it's great good for you guys, so people are onlylimited near by their imagination, because the technology sists to theprice point where any of us can be a TV station. So we can do the whole thingthat a TV station can do, which is just really mind boggling. I don't thinkthis would do have been possible even a year and a half ago, but technology hascome down in price and the capability has increased to such an extent thatyeah it's affordable for justifed anyone in business to to buy thistechnology and say that, but it's the imagination. I think that's the issueright now, people being able to get over that hurdle of at seeing thepossibilities and then exploring it. Let's get a little bit into the weedson the technology for anybody WHO's sitting here. Listening thinking, Jeez,I would love to start doing this some of the stuff but like. When do I evenstart? You know, I think it's fair to say you don't need a professionalvideographer in house or Hollywood...

...production studio these days as you'vebeen communicating the but there's still some investments you want to make.Probably so that you know it's better than the I don't know the the web canis built into your Mac, which, frankly garbage as I've found an extra hundredtwenty dollars for the web. Cam I'm using now makes a big difference, butyou can step it up another level if, if you really want to and still not breakthe bank, so I'm just curious from camera to audio to lighting. To youknow, green screen or background like what's the stuff that you guys havefound, is really worth investing in, so that you can go from. You know feelinglike just your you picked up your andrade and turned on the video to,like you, know, really feeling kind of a little a little more professionalyeah. Well initially was just do I act before about this. The first time wedid this was in March, train twenty when we realized that we had to try andfind a different way of connecting customers. So we had no idea what wewere doing. So we just went out to the local chemist ore and Canada justreleased the Lais ten. Fifty and everyone was saying it was very cheapfor its capability. So we grab that we tried to play the Inter toom and itdidn't work at all. So then it was trying to work at how to connectedthrough the zoom. So we Sich rain for software and fans, some software wecould use, but then the sound was no good. So you don't realize when you'retalking to a computer at a desk, a as you are, but as soon as you start touse it for demonstration purposes to a long way away from the screen and thesound becomes a B issue. So then the microphone comes in and we had to buy avery expensive lacapene and then obviously the background is an issue.So we bought a green screen, which I think we paid nearly two sand dollarsfor. So we've had a huge amount of money for that. First set up a becausepeople weren't really understanding what we wanted to use it for. So weprobably over a I spent also because we didn't really know what we were doingso I'll go to over to Zach, and he can talk about what we did for the tradechack yeah and what we did now is we, because you can use an slr for yourtigues, don't have to either and what's happened. Now is that, at the time wewere setting it up two years ago, a year and a half ago, is that when forthe camera that's focused on the demo...

...area, you want to actually have somegood optical components to the camera. So it's not all opticals. I need somesome physicals, even there and MEB is a really good option that sets out therefor for doing podcasting and that kind of thing that has an optical, very goodoptical component, built into it. It's not too expensive and it's just reallygood quality and as far as the web cans, you know, the lodge the lot attack. WebCans do a pretty good job. The only thing is you want to have the widestangle. Views is possible and those there's a lot of really good optionsout there, but that for under two hundred lars or so somewhere in thatneighborhood and then with the Mikes, there's a lot of really good binks outthere. Yet he's a good Mike, There's a whole bunch of other kind of Mikes thatare out there that do a really good job and, but I think more so about now- isthat zoom integrates with all this stuff before we had to do an old schoolstyle and piece bail it all together and had throwing software get thesoftware to work and felt like working with windows back in th S, you know,and but now it's because of how far we've come. You just plug it in atworks, and you know that was we. It was also really interesting. Is that wetalk about execution? Is You have to have back up up on back up of my backup when you're doing something this complicated, and we actually had twoMicrosoft computers in two apple computers? This company typically usesapple, we're both using apples right now, but I'm fine working with pcs,just because of where I come from I'll use anything really and we had applesand pcs running all of our stuff. We had pcs in the booths. We had apples ontheses mixed up in the office and it worked fine, because the software canwork on everything, it's platform, agnostic which is wonderful, and sowhat everything is just starting to work very well together now yeah so to.I think what we discovered is that you need a good microphone. You need a goodcamera and you need good Internet connection. So if you got those threethings, then you can live bibs ring.

Yes, it was. The Internet connection isgoing to make a big difference obvious Lo, when you're running all this, youknow the high rise video well with the trade show. That was on my number oneconcern. So we were going to be running three simultaneous zoom sessions,including someone like myself and someone else from Australia, and it hadto work for four days straight with Ada litch, and I was so aware that that wasalmost an impossible task and again I think he got the views go. Maybe itwould have been, but because now people are aware that the need internet is isa mast really. The invasere was there and we just had one small bitch thatlasted probably one number five minutes, maybe also Soom, is really good atrecovering from creatures, whereas all the technology wasn't and we'd have toreboot and all that sort of stuff so yeah it was. It was really a greatexperience and we were really really pleased with how good I, the Internetconnection, was also. There was very little lag. So that's another big issuethat used to be a huge problem with live streaming is the lag. We had noleg at all, so not that you could see anyway, so it's probably less than halftickings, so yeah it worked better than we did hope that it would, however, aswith all good shows performances, is that all good systems you have topressure test the vessel way before you actually go to the show. So we had weset up our booth, the head of time, and we lit everything up turn on all of allthe live feeds only up to eleven and let them run for a long period of timeand we tested this tested that and during that period of time we wentthrough two computers, blowup, okay, we had other ones in the wing, doesn'tmatter plug it in load on a zoom everything else, and we can. We canchange out a computer in about fifteen twenty minutes, and you know that youhave to pressure test everything ahead of time, because there's a lot oflittle mix and cranies that we didn't think about. You know communicatingduring the show and using a is emesene platform to interact with the people atthe booth outside of just sell home and just all these little things- and wejust had it done ahead of time so that when we went alive, we'd already madeall the mistakes, so we'd already tested everything out and the thingsthat we were worried about breaking. We had backup sport and they did break Ohyeah. Things broke quite a lot and...

...doesn't matter plug, it end keep goingand you just have to have that mentality of just being prepared andhaving enough technical knowledge both at the booths and also at the respectof warehouses, to just kind of have a moon and flow. But if you don't have tobe a rocket science and scientists, because you know most people havebecome smarter about this stuff, more knowledgeable about all the stuff thanI think. People give themselves credit for. I'm actually to that point. Deckremember the week before, when we were doing kists a factory lost the Internet.So someone cut through a cable somewhere. So for two and a half dayson the week before the show the pace that we were going to do do most of thezooming from had no internet at all, so exact raced out and bought a hotspot entered in a Gataon with one of the providers and we got up on the sothe network and tested that out as well. So we were even prepared to operatewithout the now. Let get five Internet through the building, because weexperience that during testing. So yeah testing is really important. It didn'tmatter you could we pull even the Internet that we had. The show is allthrough fig four and five g and that's and that's where're. At now. I G ismaking all this stuff possible anywhere good stuff, guys, let's swing backaround, to kind of where we started with trade shows I'd, be curious tohear you guys are ahead of the curb here, but I'd like to hear your take on.What's it going to look like when in two thousand and twenty five or twothousand and twenty six, you know say five years out, you're walking the youknow your back at Fab tack, or maybe your clime you're still sitting inAustralia, I'm streaming in. But what? What do you guys think going to bedifferent in a post pandemic world where we now live in this five g world,which will probably be six or seven g by then? Who knows- and you know,people are more accustomed to live streaming like not only that, but whatelse do you think is going to change in the years ahead in this trade showworld, but I think the trade show industry is about to undergo a hugerevolution. So if you can imagine that...

...every single exhibitor at the show atthe same technology as US, then they're going to start thinking well, why do weneed to actually go to a building? Why can't we hold a trade show remotely andnot not actually go at all? So that's something I think trader organizersneed to think about is what facilities would they need to be provide companieslike, as for the one or two people that do turn up where most of the trade showinteraction is actually happening virtually. So I think it would be avery different set up. One of the things that I really don't like abouttrade shows is the waste the amount of time and effort that spent in buildingthose stands for just a few days, and then it's all thrown away at the end ofthe show is really quite heartbreaking. I think so it's kind of an imperative.I think that we find a better way of doing this, and the cost is just hugeright now, so I also see the cost of doing trade shows reducing as peoplemove more and more into a virtual world. What do you think Zack when you see itgang yeah, and I definitely second that- and I think what we also saw at theshow is we had just as many venders walking by just checking out what we'redoing, including by the big guys like the big, huge vendors that did not goto baptes this year they had people walking the show and they were comingby. We talked to a couple as we were there and next year. I think that thebig anchor companies are going to be seriously reduced in the size of theirbooze in really leveraging the hybrid component of their booze. So they cansave money because they spend literally millions of dollars pot and there'salways a question. What are you getting out of it and the quit answer isbecoming very clear now, not a lot of specially when you got a lot ofalternatives to get just as much a more bang for your buck for a fracture ofthe cost and that's where things are headed, but the trachonites and theTRAGA organizers are resisting to the male. You know the R T t this is kindof a neat little thing, but they're not helping Oladis up to the vendors, it'sup to the companies to just innovate in spite of everything else, and that'show innovation really happens anyway, but at that's where things are headinggood stuff guys. Is there anything...

...you'd like to add to this conversationthat we have not touched on. I've thought about our whole approach tothis. So obviously, in March thousand and twenty we had a crisis and have wehandled that as a company, and I think that we've taken a problem, a bigproblem and turned it into a solution. So I think the overall message for allbe B companies, especially as I'm sure, there's going to be still more changesthat we're going to be facing in the near future is don't let problems takeyou down but see if you can make problems part of a solution. So what wedid is we took the grade capability that people were developing in havingto get on to them. Use Q codes all that sort of stuff. We use that greatcapability that Rabens had and turned it to our advantage, and I'd reallyencourage small businesses to look at issues like that in the same way and tomake problems work for you rather than let them stop you, because what whatthat means is that US is a smaller midsize company. We were just as aswell put together and put on a show just as good as a lot of the otherbigger, more well funded company has been so much more footprint, and thatwas there's a lot of kind of like Whoa. What just like holy. This is totallypossible. A lot of paradigm shifts were happening, is they are walking by, andI can't wait that tech next year. It's going to be Real, interesting to seethe absolutely awesome guys. Well, I appreciate you doing this today. I wantto give you a chance to talk about where people can learn about MC techand tig brush your product specifically and where they can get touch with youguys so fire away. But I say the number one pot of cool is to go to www bromand we've got just everything there on the website yeah and to to to yourpoint as well: Wherever will we have an office in a Royal Annoy Fully StockWarehouse? We don't have any issues with stock at all and we also havefully stocker house and in Australia, and we sell globally so we're all over.The place, but we really focus on it,...

...part of also what we're trying to do atthe show is showing that not only are we selling a product that we're sellinga solution and were selling the support of that solution through innovativeplatforms and means, and that's in the Bataban and in the the industrial spaceanybody can can buy a product, but it's the company behind the product thatpeople are really caring about and the people really by, and we really takethat seriously and it's working really well. So if you do Sanita well owningand you want to remove the he can come and talk to us, because we can help youin all sorts of different ways, fantastic well, once again guys, Iappreciate you doing this. I think this is a really interesting conversationand congratulate you guys for getting out ahead of the curve on thetechnology front here when it comes to you know where trade shows are headedand what you could do with live video streaming. I think it's really cool, soI think we're going to get a lot of our listeners are going to get to value outof this. Thank you thanks very much for having us. It's been really great.Talking to you do that and as for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on thenext episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools, specificallyfor B to B manufacturers at grill, seventy sicot flash learning. Thank youso much for listening until next time E T.

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