The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode 119 · 2 months ago

What Does “Made in America” Mean to You?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

When someone says “made in America,” it has always been said with a sense of pride. It is a term that has traditionally been associated with quality and reliability. But what does “made in America” mean, and do the benefits of keeping things stateside outweigh offshoring operations? 

In 2013, Brandon Acker purchased Titan Abrasive Systems after spending five years learning the ins and outs of the business. As President of Titan Abrasive, Brandon oversees the design and manufacturing of the company's complete line of blast room and blast Machine Products for industrial applications. In this episode, Brandon talks about what being "made in America" means and the benefits of sourcing components that are made in the USA.  

Join us as we discuss:

  • The advantages of being fully made in America as a manufacturing operation
  • What's happening at the US government level to help manufacturers bring manufacturing back to the US
  • What happened to the manufacturing workforce after the pandemic
  • Brandon's advice for manufacturers wanting to become a made-in-America business

People might not even realize how much stuff is globally sourced and produced. I think people going to the store and they just they're grabbing stuff off the shelf, they're buying components and not many people are looking at where. Where does that come from? Welcome to the manufacturing executive podcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that are driving mid size manufacturers forward. Here you'll discover new insights from passionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share about their successes and struggles, and you'll learn from B two B sales and marketing experts about how to apply actionable business development strategies inside your business. Let's get into the show. Welcome to another episode of the Manufacturing Executive podcast. I'm Joe Sullivan, your host and a CO founder of the Industrial Marketing Agency guerilla. Seventy six made in America. When someone says that, they often say it with a sense of pride. It's a term that's traditionally been associated with quality and reliability, but it's also a term with some layers to it. So what exactly does made in America mean? And in an era when many companies are rethinking the benefits of offshoring their manufacturing operations. Does made in America now come with an even stronger meaning? My guest today will dive into all of this. Let me introduce him. Brandon acker purchased Titan abrasive systems from his uncle in after having spent five years at Titan learning the INS and outs of the business. Since then he has been in the process of completely redesigning and upgrading the entire product line. As president of Titan Abrasive, brandon oversees the design and manufacture of the company's complete line of blastroom and blast machine products for industrial applications. Brandon is passionate about a a can manufacturing, the jobs it creates, the quality produced and the bright future that lies ahead. That's why he sources made in the USA components for all titans blast cleaning equipment. Brandon holds a Bachelor of Science degree from Arizona State University. Brandon, welcome to the show. Thanks, Joe, thanks for having me. Yeah, you, bet Um and brandon. Let let's just open this up with a question that may seem very simple on the surface, but it's got a lot of layers to it, as I think our listeners will will find out today if they're kind of not already thinking that that way. Um. What exactly does made in America mean? That is a that is a good question, Um, and I think it can mean it's different things to different people and different levels of it. To me and to US Titan as company, made in America is, you know, making as much of the products as we can in the country. To us it means you know quality, you know better quality product,...

...you know keeping keeping jobs here state side. Um. To others it can mean different things that the levels have made in America. To us, when we're where we're made in America, we're we're we're going all in, we're we're manufacturing as as much of the components as we can, are sourcing as much of the components as we can here here in the US. Um. Even for us it's it's almost impossible to go a hundred percent. Um. There are a couple of couple of small electrical components and things that just are not cannot locate them here in the states. Um. But I know for for some other companies there's a kind of gray area on that, on that made in America or assembled in the United States, assembled in the United States from globally sourced components. Um, engineered in the United States, but then it's manufactured elsewhere. Um. So there's a couple of the wording of it's a little tricky. Um. And I'd say when people when you're looking at product labels, you'll see that sometimes it will say made the US. Uh. You know, we're assembled in the US from global components. Um, we're we're pretty much all made the U S if it's uh, we're making as much as we can here, we're assembling it here. Um. So for so, for us it's a big deal, it's a lot of work and it's what you know, we stand behind it because we believe in it and we like we like what it uh, what it adds, and want to bring that back to what what used to be, what the US used to be. You know, decades ago, where it was, people knew like hey, if it's made in the US, that's that's a good quality product. Um. And I think that the rest of the world knew that and people bought, you know, from from the US because they knew it was a good a good quality product. Um. And we're we're hoping to keep that going and hopefully everyone else doesn't bring more of that, get us back to where we used to be as a country and manufacturing, I think would be good, good for everyone. You were recently telling me about the domino effect that can occur when a company claims made in America, staff at us for their products, but then maybe they make a change somewhere along their supply chain and their manufacturing process. Can you illustrate what that looks like for us and as an example, for we're manufacturing larger, larger pieces of equipment that have have many different components to the nuts bolts, you know, electrical components, Um, that that we don't obviously don't manufacture every single product ourselves in house. Um. So if it can be, you know, a small electrical component that we buy that from a company that manufactured the theory in the US, and they can be a large company and that's why we chose them and purchase their product because it's made in the US. And if all of a sudden they decide two offshore that and take that production of that small electrical component to another country, now it affects us what they do and everyone else who buys that small electrical component because that now they've now they've taken it overseas. So now it's no longer component that we can says made in...

...the US, where it lowers our percentage of our components that are made in the US on our equipment. Um So, so it has a has a big effect on everyone else by things that you can't control. Other companies that you're sourcing your products from that might decide to offshore that. Now those components are not available to you and put you under the scope of a decision of do we continue with that manufacturer and take that that one component, if it's just, you know, uh, one of three d components that's now sourced internationally, or is it worth US delving into trying to find another manufacturer of manufacture that same product in the United States? Um So, it can into turn into a lot of work for the manufacturer WHO's trying to keep that made an America thing, going into having having to sour thives or a different product or, you know, deal with the fact that that's now a product that you cannot claim is made in the US. Can can have a big effect on others and it's that one little component is something we use, but it might be something that you know five other companies use that little component. So by that the company that makes it outsourcing it, now you've just affected five other companies that use your component, um, but by outsourcing it, so that that can be a that could be a big challenge for some and effects of big companies doing something that you know affects smaller companies that they might not even be thinking of when they're deciding to to off shore that product, production of that product. But from your perspective, what are some of the advantages of being fully made in America as a manufacturing operation? The biggest advantage for us is is pride, that being proud of knowing that we make something here in the in the US. Um. What we've seen recently, and I'm sure everyone um on the planet has seen this due to the pandemic, is sourcing those products. You know what what can happen with us being we're we're affected to even making our own components here in the in the United States, there can still be that that small component that that's not that's outsourced, that comes from somewhere else, and we've we've been burned by Um, you know, still are here and there by affecting our lead times. Where we're producing it here, we can produce it as quick as possible. Um, but that one little component, you know, might hold up our entire large order because we're waiting for one small component to come in. So by by controlling that and bringing as much of that into the into the US and keeping it um in this country, I think it provides much quicker lead times. You're more in control, you're closer to that product, Um, you're the qualities a little better. Um. So that the sourcing part of it, I think. And lead times is a huge, huge factor. Um. I know for for us as well as other other companies, other customers and bars that we have. Um. Recently had a customer, I know that makes a large piece of equipment that are a multimillion dollar Um piece of equipment,...

...that we're waiting for a hundred dollar electric component to come in and said, like, we literally have a two million dollar machine sitting on our doctor ship and we're waiting for a hundred dollar electrical component to come in and it won't work without it. So we're stuck, you know, for months sitting there. And then you have customers calling, Hey, where is this? Where's our product? While it's sitting here for a hundred dollar component. Sounds almost foolish like white ages ship it, but it doesn't work without it, unfortunately, and some of those components are just difficult to find um elsewhere. So I think it's better if if everyone gets involved and makes as much as they can in this country. I think it will. It will help everyone and will help that that supply chain and uh, and and and getting things sourced quicker in the lead times. Um. So that, I'd say, that is by far the biggest thing and biggest thing that's affected us recently, Um as well as a lot of other manufacturers, is just the lead time. The lead time one things, and getting, uh, getting components and not knowing. I now there was a I think they've cleared it up. Even for the ports were backed up Um in China and they couldn't get you know, boats aren't coming in. So you've got apart that's going to be on a boat for a month, but the boat hasn't even left yet. So now you're like when will it no one knows. So it's holding up your your whole production can be a major, major issue. Yeah, it's just other than just keeping with with better quality. We find all the components we source in the US. We we rarely ever have any issues with them and you seem like they're a better, better quality component Um for our so it makes us, you know, we we try our best to make it as good of a quality product as we can. So we have to source those components and we're not making them. We rely on others too, you know, keep up their end of the deal and make make the best components they can, and we find when you're sourcing that in the US that that seems to be the case. You're getting the much better quality, quality product, quality component. Coming back around to your your point there about the supply chain woes, and I'm getting the sense from people in manufacturing who are inside of these operations and struggling with sourcing and lead times. It's it feels like the the appeal of made in America is is clearly on the rise again after, you know, a couple of decades of a lot of offshoring happening, that that among manufacturing people that perception seems to be on the rise again of the value of made in America. Do you think that the public's perception of made in America America is also growing. Like. Are we seeing that, um with, you know, end users of products, or is it? Has that not trickled back down yet to consumers? I think it has and I think that it is growing and building up more and more steam now. Um and I guess that's one thing we can be thankful for. The pandemic, you know, kind of kick that in and made people realize, Um, you know, the effects of not not keeping things made in your country and the globalization of everything that does. It does have its down sides, Um...

...and I think that came to light, Um, in in recent recent times with being able to source that Um, it kind of can be there's a little component bringing it all back into the US. Um. I think protective gear was a big thing that people realized, you know, when the for the for the covid and that that when we're not making things state side, that that can be a a big issue when you're not. All of a sudden it brought that hey, we can't get this anymore. Well, people might not even realize how much stuff is globally sourced and produced. I think people going to the store and they just they're grabbing stuff off the shelf they're buying components and not many people are looking at where where does that come from? Where do all those components come from? They're just they're just used to buying it. They grab it and I think now people are thinking more of it and paying attention to where where does that come from? Looking at a label and saying, Hey, where does this product from? Like, uh, well, tonight's all over the world. And is it going to be an issue? Um, you know, we we have a couple of small components. I know that we think of if we're getting this, will it be an issue in the future? Like this is a new product, we came out with, it uses this component. You know, everything is good now, we can get that component, but all of a sudden if we can't, if that's gonna be a problem, that's gonna create a problem for our our larger component in the future. Um. But yeah, I think it is. I think it is is growing and getting steam and hopefully, uh, hopefully that continues and more more people realize that. You know, we're we're all better off if we do what we can to make things make things here. Um. So, as far as how how long it'll take to get to that where we where we wanted to be, back to where it was, you know, thirty years ago. I don't know, could could be a while, but at least we're we're going in the right direction. I think there is uh, there's some awareness of it now, more more than ever. There's a lot of buzz around the term re shoring in recent years and you and I were talking about how I had Harry Moser from the reshoring initiative on the show a while back to talk about it. I'm just kind of curious from your perspective, do you see anything happening like at a US government level or UM supporting reshoring? Like what kind of efforts are being made to help, or hopefully attempt to help, manufacturers kind of bring back manufacturing to the US? Yeah, I know the government is. I know the current administration has has their know, been trying to, you know, make the buy American Um, you know, better for everyone and and source that. I know, as far as uh, we've always had that with the we we do a lot of business with the with the government, with the military in particular, and they've always had a when they buy buy American Um and they try to buy, you know, US made and they've always had a when they buy American it's a just there's there's a percentage of components in assist that have to be made in the United States to be under...

...their label made in America. And that was, believed it or not, fifty five percent, which is not, in my mind, not very high. You're you're just just passing that a halfway point Um. And that they have done. They've increased that Um too. I believe it's now sixt with plans to increase that to six, I believe, by four and seventy nine Um. So that that's a that's a big thing. That's gonna be obviously the especially with the government governments a major the largest buyering in the world, um. So that that's going to help help other companies and help help the American made things when when they're now sourcing higher, higher quantities of products made, you know, and having a stricter control over that and how how much of that product has to be made in the US. So I think that's going to be in there was also talk about the the labeling that made in America, people being able to put that product label where. I think people were just realizing it was kind of like a trend and they could jump on that bandwagon, like hey, let's make a main American sticker and stick it on our product and they now we'll sell them where we're going to go, put on the website, and they begin to crack down on that as well. Um, as to you know, are people really using that? They're not just using it to sell sell things? Um, the advertising of it that they're actually making those components in the US. Um. So that's been something. Um. I think there's the buy American Act. Um. There are, believe there's tax credits, Um, for for companies for the reassuring if they're bringing bringing jobs and bringing business back into the United States. I know they're their tax credits available for that. Um, people even expanding their manufacturing here in the states rather than off shoring it. Um. And then, as well as the opposite of pinalizing people companies that are that are offshoring. I know that's been uh, been in the works as well. Um, some training programs they've set up invested some money into, uh, you know, helping to train, you know, the quantity and quality of the skilled workers in our labor force, which has been an issue in an ongoing issue for manufacturing is trying to get, you know, the talent, getting the people that we need to keep manufacturing going into keeping the right people and keeping them uh, you know, helping the trades, helping the trade schools, apprentice ships and keeping keeping that going. So I know they're they're investing heavily in that as well. Um, I know we've done some work with there's some local MVP s there called which are manufacturing extension partnerships, which are have some some funding from the government Um, as well, that are that are big to help businesses and particularly manufacturers, manufacturers grow. Um, so that that's a big thing as well, with the government helping, helping to keep those guys going. They've been in big help to many manufacturers, including ourselves. Okay, let's take a quick break here. I want to let a couple of our strategists at guerrilla seventy six tell you about something pretty cool...

...that we're doing right now for marketing folks in the manufacturing sector. Peyton and Mary, take it away. Yes, so I'm Peyton Warrant and I'm Mary Kio. Twice a month we host a live event called industrial marketing live. Right now we have a group of fifty plus industrial marketers from a variety of manufacturing organizations. We meet up digitally to learn, ask questions, network and get smarter. Every session has a designated topic and one of our team members at guerrilla seventy six opens up by teaching for the first half hour or so. Topics have included how to get better at a manufacturing Webinar, getting started with paid social on Linkedin, how to optimize your website for conversions, creating amazing video content and so much more. After we break it down, we open it up to q and a so we can help you apply all of this in your own business. This is this is pure value, no cost, no strings attached, no product or service pitches, just so unadulterated learning experience. Oh and on top of these live sessions, we've also opened up a slack channel where our attendees bounce ideas off each other and learned together all week long between sessions. We're building a true community of manufacturing marketing professionals here. So if you or someone at your company has the Word Marketing in his or her job title, please consider telling them about it. They can visit industrial marketing live dot com to register. We love to see you there. I'm curious to hear your perspective on this, Brandon, because this is something I've been thinking about recently. You know, if we continue to see, Um, this sort of trend towards reshoring, and yeah, I mean government efforts to help that happen, manufacturers who are committed to bringing jobs back, but then, alongside that, we keep seeing this exodus of workers from the manufacturing sector, and while we're already in in the middle of the labor shortage, how's all this work going to get done? That is a good question. Million Dollars. I'm hoping you have I'm hoping you have the answer that everybody is looking for right I wish I do that. That is a yeah, that's a that's a tricky one. It's we're dealing with it now, issues with it, and it's not even we haven't even got all those jobs back. And we're we're we're a small company compared to some of the others. Who Can, who can reassure and bring back thousands of jobs? Um, that if, if you know, we're we're a small manufacturer. We already have issues with our our our labor forcing, getting skilled, skilled people to work to actually manufacture and produce this thing. Um, what we need, and I know that's across the board. With other manufacturers that we deal with, we typically are a B, two b. We sell to other manufacture as we buy things from other manufacturers. Um. So I know that's...

...a problem across the board in manufacturing is just find finding Labor Um, and it's I don't know. I don't think anyone knows what what happened. What happened to everyone that you know pre pandemic? It was it was moving along there. You didn't hear people having, you're always issues like they do now, where labor shortages, and it just didn't it didn't seem to happen. Then the pandemic hit and now all of a sudden it seems like people, people vanished. We don't have it's not all of a sudden that all these manufacturing companies popped up and now after the pandemic there's, you know, more manufacturers exist. I don't think that's the case. I think it's the same same guys out there trying to do it and just lost lost their labor force. Um. So I don't know if anyone knows really where they went. Or what happened to that labor force that they're they're they're not working anymore. Um, and not I don't think they're going going elsewhere. And what industry is sucking up all those that that we're in manufacturing? Um. I think it will be good for, you know, the government to invest more into that, into into the UH, you know, partnerships with other programs, into the trades, into apprenticeship, trade schools. I think they need to uh, you know, realize that that it's a big manufacturing is a big thing. It's it's a good paying job, it's quality product or producing Um. I think we had a time where everyone went to it was more of the the office job. Everyone went to college and that seemed to be like a big shift of like everyone going to college. And now you have all these college people. No one wants to get into the trades. And if a bunch of, you know, college kids who can't get jobs, whereas the trades are are looking for people, but now they don't have the same skill set it, whereas the guy who went to trade school now he's got his choice. You know, the welder's got fifty jobs lined up. He can he can pick and choose Um. If if we continue that, I think maybe there's a way to go and we have a lot always have an u immigration issue. Maybe maybe there's a way to bring people. They start bringing people from other countries and people who are willing to work, that want to work hard. You know, hard working people has always been what's kept this country going. Um, you know, and people from all over the world. It's always been and always will be, and maybe we need to delve into that more. Say Like uh, you know, put put more work visas out there, getting people from from other countries that hey, if you're if you're hard working, you want to come here and work, you have a skill set, you know, in manufacturing and trade. You know, it's and start bringing those people and we can offer, you know, higher paying jobs, better quality of life and and, uh, and bringing those skills from elsewhere if we can. If we can't get it here, because I think it will, it will be a problem. If, if it's a problem now, I think unfortunately that problem is going to grow unless unless we do something about it, get more people into the trades or, you know, we have to source those skilled people elsewhere. Yeah, I think there's some good points there. You know, I've had a lot of conversations with different people in the manufacturing sector about that topic and I think some...

...of the conclusions on drawing are, you know, a. We need to change the perception of manufacturing in the minds of Um, those who are preparing to enter the workforce, as well as their parents. And you know, there's, I think, a perception of what manufacturing is that is is outdated. And there's UM. You know, it's a different world now than twenty thirty years ago. There's a lot of interesting technology. There's more emphasis on creating safe, clean, you know, workplaces where people actually want want to be, and I think so. I think that's part of changing, changing the perception of what a manufacturing job is. Um. I think there's reaching under represented demographics in manufacturing Um more, you know, exposure and outreach to women, to Um, you know, people from different ethnic backgrounds that are not traditionally present in manufacturing ing Um. You know, parts of our our community that just haven't haven't been uh UH. You know, looked at manufacturing as as an option before and wind up in retail or wind up in, you know, other places that you maybe would default to Um. But yeah, I think. I think there's some of that. And then I think there's automation and robotics and the accessibility of of Um, new technologies that fall into those categories that probably were not as accessible due to cost and infrastructure needed maybe ten, fift twenty years ago, and now you see, uh, I mean there's so many great companies that are helping deploy robots and settings where they you know, it would have previously taken really large, you know, capital investments, Um and changes to infrastructure. So I think the I think you're gonna see a lot of that helping. It's gonna be a necessity to help fill that void. So these are just kind of some of the trends I'm picking up on and things that I'm hearing from other manufacturing leaders. Yeah, and I agree. I think manufacturing has changed and I think it's not what you know, the dirty, uh, the dirty factory floor that people thought it was. It's it's manufacturing. You know, you're you're whacking a sledgehammer against them steel and a dirty factory like Nah, it's it's it's not like that, and it certainly hasn't. The technology has come in, robotics that come in, you know, lasers. We use lasers that, you know, things that we never never dreamed that's what we'd be doing, that programming a laser that's cutting out all your metal for you, you know, in uh, in a fraction of at the time, Um, and someone, you know, there's people have to program those lasers. So it's much different the jobs that are out there where you're not just uh, you know, grinding away in a dirty factory floor. You know, there's a lot of h better quality, quality jobs, you know, with the robotics, the computers that come into the manufacturing Um. I think it's it's really opened up for people in the in the variety of jobs that are available in manufacturing. Um. I think it's has broadened over the years and it's not it's...

...not what manufacturing was decades ago. Yeah, these are all all truths and I think it's a matter of disseminating that message to the right people and and again changing perception. Yeah, yeah, we need an ad campaign in that campaign out there for manufacturing like it's indeed. Well, I think there's some great advocates out there. I've had a number of them on this show actually, that are helping do that. But it's you know, it's a one, one step at a time and it's gonna take time, but it certainly will. See, something took us a long time to get into the position we're in now. It didn't know where we we off shored things. It doesn't doesn't happen overnight and it won't won't happen overnight to get it all back, but at least it's good to know we're our thinking has changed, the mindset has changed and I think we're changing direction and heading in a better down a better road now. Yeah, I think. I think it's coming back. And will you said, just pick a little time. Certainly, brandon. I like to always make these conversations actionable when possible. So you know, if you're a manufacturing leader listening right now and you're thinking about becoming a truly made in America business, UM, or trying to move in that direction, Um, what are the questions that you should be asking yourself right now? I think I think there's a few questions and it's just knowing right off the bat it's it's not it's not simple. It's not a none of one size fits all that you're just like hey, let's let's let's go mad made in America. You know, it's it's it's the trend. Everyone's going for that. It might not be a good fit for everyone. Um, I think you want to ask yourself, like why? Why do you want to do that? Why is it important to you? Um, I know there are other companies out there that exist, that are manufacturing things in America because they couldn't. Their story is that they couldn't find it. They couldn't find that product made in the US. So so you found it like a there's nothing that exists. So there it is. You, you you met that demand. You know there's a man for something it's not existing and create something that can be made in the US. That would be you know that there was a good reason. So I think you really have to ask yourself why are you? Why are you going down that road, uh, and that maybe making that commitment to things in the US, Um, you know, to making sure it's the right fit for your company. Um, you know, if the cost involved in it, the time involved in it. Um, we source our products. It's it's some are easier than others, some are are almost impossible. Um, that that take a long time. We use Um, you know, in our blast cabinet. We use an led lighting system in there and it took us a lot of work and a long time to find what I was the only company in this country that manufactures led lights Um in the US. Um. So it took a long time to find them, but now we did. Um. I think some others have popped up since, but you want to make sure you're gonna have that time and that the finances and the time to to go down that road and look...

...a look at vendors and where your things are coming from. Um. You know that sourcing and you may find that checking with your your suppliers or vendors to see where, where are those products coming from? There might be a lot of products that they're already made in the U S that you're unaware of. I know a lot of buyers are buying products in big companies and they don't ask because they never had to. So you might want to just, you know, dabbling that. Go through, grow through your list, go through your vendors, Um, find out where your supplies are coming from. You know, you might be surprised. A lot of them might already be coming from the US, or it could be the other way you might think they are and they're not. Um. So you definitely have to put your time into that finding out you know where they coming from. Are they actually coming from made? Are they actually made in the US? Are they coming from this country? You can't a simple search on the website doesn't doesn't really work anymore. So a lot of products you look and you can't find it's almost like a secret. You know and you assume they're not, but sometimes they are made in this country and they just don't they just don't advertise it. Not everyone uses it in their marketing or advertising as a as a benefit. Um. I would also ask if you're what's your customer base or would it? Does it matter to your customers before you put into all this work, the time, the money investing into that? Doesn't make a difference to your customers, or are they looking for things made in the US? or or maybe they don't care? It won't it won't make a difference to them. Um, you know, if it's if it's just a small component maybe that they're buying from you. Maybe maybe it doesn't matter. Maybe they don't ask that question. You know, is it is it coming from the US? Maybe it doesn't matter. So you wouldn't want to put all that work in time into it if it's not going to affect your customers, if your customers don't care. So I would I would pull some customers and see and just know is is that? Is that something that that is a value to to your customer, to your customer base? Um, I would also ask maybe about if it's valuable to them and what what are the effects of doing that? Like I said, it's going to be expensive. You know, you're gonna have to put some time and money into sourcing those products. A lot of products made in the US are are more costly. That's why a lot of people offshore and to make a cheaper product. So obviously that buying those components at a higher price. Obviously it's going to affect your your end price. Um. So you're you're going to have to increase pricing. Is that something you can do? Is that going to, you know, drive off your customers? If, if your product increases ten percent, is that going to be? You know, how competitive are you? Um? You know, if if you're if you have competitors out there, that you're really, really close to Um, that all of a sudden you think, hey, if if we have a ten percent increase, we're gonna lose, lose a lot of business, then maybe it's not not the right choice for you. Um, certainly no one wants to lose customers, but so I would definitely put, uh put some thought into it. It's it's not a it's not necessarily an easy thing. You know, take takes time, a lot of a lot of research and finding those products cost in evolved in it.

Um and and no one is a manufacturer. No one knows your business like you do. To really have to just ask yourself, is this the right fit for us and for for your customers? You know, is it going to benefit you? Is it going to benefit them? Do they do? They want that right? Well, Brandon, really good conversation today. And anything else you want to add that I didn't ask you about? No, not really, just hoping, hoping more people do it, hopefully more people will see the benefits to it, the benefits to uh you know, having a better quality product and uh you know, it'll help us. It will help the rest of the world come back and and and buy from the U S and Um, hopefully some more people consider it. It keeps this going and uh yeah, I appreciate you having me on. I really doing getting it out absolutely. Can you tell our audience how they can get in touch with you and where they can learn more about tighten abrasive systems? Probably easiest ways to uh, we're obviously we're we're on social media, we're on Linkedin, but probably easiest ways on our website. We're just tighten abrasive, DOT COM abrasive. It's singular nos um phone numbers on there. You can call us, email US um. We have a lot of a lot of information on our website to some videos or products and info. We even have some some info about about our our journey into making things in in the in the states and what's involved in that. So you can look at that and have any questions. Feel free to give us a call, shoot us an email. Happy to help perfect. We'll brandon, thanks for doing this today. No problem. Thank you. I really appreciate it. As for the rest of you, I hope to catch you on the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive. You've been listening to the manufacturing executive podcast. To ensure that you never miss an episode, subscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player if you'd like. To learn more about industrial marketing and sales strategy. You'll find an ever expanding collection of articles, videos, guides and tools specifically for B two B manufacturers at guerrilla seventy dot com flash learn. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time, MMMMMM.

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