The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 2 months ago

Why We’re Proud to Be Manufacturers & Engineers

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

At first, his entry into the manufacturing industry was out of a need for survival.

But it quickly grew into a passion to encourage those who want to become a better version of themselves to embrace the hope, pride, and success to be found in manufacturing.

In this episode, I interview Tony Gunn, General Manager at MTDCNC Global and Founder and CEO at Your Tea of Life, about his amazing career trajectory from being kicked out of three colleges to entrepreneurship.

In this episode we discuss:

  • How manufacturing equips us to create our own futures
  • Tony’s discovery of his passion for learning and creating
  • Why manufacturing is such a welcoming and uplifting career
  • 3 stories about struggle, success, and advocacy

Check out these resources we mentioned during the podcast:

  • Tony’s podcast is The Gunn Show

To ensure that you never miss an episode of The Manufacturing Executive, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or Spotify, or here.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Manufacturing Executive in your favorite podcast player.

I want parents when somebody goes heywhat your kid do. Oh my kids, a pilot and they puff out their chests yeahwe're proud of the pilots. Awesome we need you. I fly around all the time,but i also want the parent next to them to go well what your kid do puff outyour chest. So he's an engineer. He helped build that plane. I want peopleto be equally as proud of the doctors and the people who are making themedical devices. I want that awareness to grow so that we're proud of eachother for what we do. Welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here. You'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles, and you will learn from b to b sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get into the show, welcome to another episode of themanufacturing executive podcast, i'm joe sullivan your host and a co founderof the industrial marketing agency guerilla. Seventy six one of myfavorite things about working with the manufacturing sector is seeing all theways our clients shape the world around us. Everything you see that doesn'tgrow out of the earth was designed, engineered and built by someone. Iguess today is someone who's, passionate about sharing all the goodthat engineering can do in this world. His passion and enthusiasm for bothengineering and manufacturing is undeniable and it's the type of energy.We need to shed a positive light on this industry for the next generation.So on that note, let me introduce tony gun. Tony gun is an avid world,traveler, visionary and all around people person having travelled overfifty countries around the world, he's transcended two plus decades ofengineering and manufacturing experience into a partnership withmtdna world's most popular machining channel, an effort to create awarenessfor all the amazing products, people and opportunities within thefascinating world where math, science and creativity are baptized andimmersed as one tony is an international best selling author,whose book went number one and seven countries under topics like self help.Personal transformation and motivational growth he's also the hostof an exciting new podcast series. The gun show where guests have theopportunity to share their stories with the world which helps humanize andindustry. That's incredibly misunderstood. Tony has also appliedhis years of world travels and independent studies in order to createa natural healing company known for its one of a kind combination of herbs,roots and flowers, which help prevent, improve and remove ailments of allkinds. Much of the prophets from this company go to the well being of peoplein need the rehab of the earth and innocent forgotten animals. Tonywelcome to the show, thank you so much...

...for having me brother, it's good to behere. Yeah man! Well, we've kind of known each other. We've been kind oflike in the same circles. I feel like in linked in especially a lot of commonconnections, and i'm always commenting on your post and you on mine and stuff,and we didn't actually physically talk until about a month ago or so. So it'sit's good to be having a real live conversation with it with you here,yeah, that's odd! In the world. We live in these days right where you send eachother text, messages or emails or little linked on messages, but we oftenfail to pick up the phone and go hey. So that's what your voice sounds likeawesome. You sound as great as you look. You know that kind of thing right, soyeah, we've known each other for quite a while we're surrounded by a lot ofthe same influencers and brilliant minds, because you similar to me, welike to surround ourselves with people that are smarter than ourselves, sothat we can learn something, and one of my favorite quotes is your smartestperson in the room you're in the wrong room, get the hell out of there. I likethat for sure. Well, tony, you know when we talked it was you know i pickedyou for as a possible. You know candidate for this podcast, because isee your content, all the all the time on linkedin, in particular, thinkyou've got twenty one sand, plus followers. As of the last time, i'vechecked, which is pretty awesome. You've got a great platform forbroadcasting a message, and you share a lot of super interesting videos. I meanlike machines at work, also a lot of things that i want to get into a littlelater in this conversation, like things really interesting applications ofengineering, for he the greater good of humanity. Frankly and there's some coolexamples, ill maybe mention in a bit, but you know when i, when i had you inmind for the show, i'm like. Oh, let's talk about how you know using linkedinand and some of the video content that you're curating and posting and wasuntil we had a conversation that i learned some of the stories from thatkind of of how you got to where you are today and some of the challenges you'vebeen through, and so usually i say, hey one of you know i usually tell my guess:won't you o talk a little bit about how you got here for a couple minutes, i'mgoing to say once you talk about how you got here for as long as you want to,because you got a super interesting story to tell i think and with love foryou to tell our listeners about how it's sort of shaped who and where youare today, yeah i'd absolutely love to. But to start just let me say thank youfor finding value in my linkedin page and in the posts, and i hope others doas well. It's certainly one of those hopefully present that in a way thathas very little to do with ego and very much to do with awareness. You know, ihope that it provides people a platform to see something they haven't seenbefore or feel inspired to want to be a part of an industry where they didn'trealize. You know some pieces are being created. You know, oftentimes, we don'tput two and two together to go. Oh man, my you know my best friend he just cameback. You know, he's a military vet, he just came back and he had a horrificaccident. You know thank you for the service type of thing, but he's missinga limb holy crap. I didn't realize that being an engineering means i can helpthat limb come back in some sort of...

...bionic and really cool way. So andthat's just one tiny example, i know we'll talk about that a little bit more.I just wanted to just say thank you for paying attention to to that, and i hopeit provides a great platform for others as well, but back to your question ofhow i got where i am today and will find out what the listeners, if it'sinteresting or not, i think it is. I think it's pretty wild actually and i'mone of those stubborn guys that pretty much does whatever i want. If it feelsright and it doesn't hurt anyone right, so i'm not going to go, be violent, butif a rule doesn't make sense to my logical side of my brain, you canforget about it. I'm going to ignore that all day long and so i've ended upin some unique situations and some unique places. I guess to start. Ithink it's important for people to understand, especially the kids oftoday, but also- let me you know- maybe i should take out especially and goespecially the parents today, but also emphasize that i import that the kidslearn, because there was a generation where we, i think our parents and the parents before them.There was a generation that felt like a lot of manufacturing kind of hurt them,and what i mean by that is a lot of products are being off shore and donein other places. Right and and a lot of jobs were lost, and so people got stuckbeing. You know having this education or having this this technical ability,but there was no job for it, because so much stuff was being offshore for alast couple of generations and we're just starting to realize again howsignificant it is that we can create here at home that wecan build here at home that we can reach store here at home, and thereason i'm explaining this is because part of where i come from and part ofwhat i'm about to share is all inclusive into that awareness andrealization, and really just as massive passion that ultimately goes back towanting to help people right. So, as i was growing up, i didn't grow up soeasily and you're welcome to to interrupt me in any point, be like. Areyou serious right now or wherever you want to do? Your welcome to interruptme brother at any time, but you know i grew up in a situation that didn't havea lot of money, not a lot of opportunity. The only thing that i grewup with really was stubborn mind and soccer skills, so my whole life. Ithought i was a be a professional soccer player which, as everyone cansee, did not work out. I wasn't quite good enough. I played in college, i wason you know, like the all american team, you know things like that, but it'sjust a completely different level of understanding when you get to the realelite, the one percent of the one percent of the one percent right, anddue to that factor, i needed to get a job, and i just sohappened to happen to the world of manufacturing, because the company hadthe best insurance around i needed insurance. I need to take care of mybeat up soccer body so at that time, by default no degree actually to be fair.I got kicked out of three colleges. I want that not to be looked down upon. Iwant it to be looked at with authenticity, because a message i wantto create for people outside of this industry right now that think that theymay not have hope there is. You can...

...come into this industry if your father,you know, doesn't provide a massive or your mother doesn't provide a massiveamount of income for you. If you happen to be on the wrong side of the tracks,as people say, and you don't believe, there's any opportunity, whether it beyou know jail or whatever, whatever it might be right. What your future is iswhat we can create. We can. We can massively create whatever future wewant, and so for me admitting. I got kicked out of three colleges, thinkingthat i was going to be a soccer player and never graduated. I want thatmessage to be shared. I wanted to have a volume, and i want people who thinkthat they're going through a similar situation to go well shoot if he'straveled the world over fifty countries and learned and worked with some of themost elite companies on the planet, like the googles and the teslas and thespace sex and the apples- and you got kicked out of three colleges that maybei can do it too right. So that's the message i want to provide now to becomethe person that i am today and you mention this as well, with a lot of thedirection and post that i make have to do in the direction of compassion,caring unity, doing good for one another. When i was at early, is i moreor less died in the hospital biona took my life suffocated my lungs. I've hadfriends killed at a young age, i've had family members lost at a young age.There were a lot of trials and tribulations that happened from aboutage, twenty one to about twenty five or so right, and there was a lot ofsuffering to be fair, a lot of emotional suffering. You know and andthat emotional suffering started to suffocate me and what i did, which noteveryone can do, but how i found my way out of a really dark place was throughmusic and i was never good at it, but i actually performed tiptop music foralmost a decade and some people go hiphop music. Why don't know that youdo not look like a hip, hop guy and i don't and it was by default becausebefore i got kicked out of college i wrote poetry for the newspaper and icannot sing no matter how bad i love to sing. But it's awful. So by default icould say words in rhymes and i needed to get some things off of my chest onmy suffering that i was going through, so that therapeutic situation just wasincrepet and i'm going to kind of leave it there, because i don't want to talktoo much because i value your opinion and your segues as well. My friend, butthat's kind of the very beginning of my journey before i became a machinistbefore i switched into a different style of machine before i startedtraveling around and before what i'm doing today, a lot of it came fromabsolute suffering, which is kind of how duality works. How do we know whata good apple tastes like if we've never tasted a bad apple? You know what imean. How do we know these differences if we don't get to experience thesedifferences, so i am extremely grateful for the hardships and the amount ofhardships i went through it one time to...

...allow me to appreciate all thegreatness. That's around me right now. That's really cool. I love how youtaking your life experiences and some of the you know the tough things youwent through as a child and into your early adult life and and figured outhow to turn that into something positive, not only for yourself but inthe message you kind of broadcast for for the world and and particularly forthe manufacturing world. So you mentioned you got into manufacturingbecause you needed insurance and you found a job and they had insurance. I,but tell me, like i, mean you're, a guy who kind of hoses passion for what youdo, it's very clear. What was it once you've got into manufacturing that madeyou say like yeah. This is for me. This is this is where i'm going to take mycareer from here. It's a it's a really excellent question. Jo, it really isand the reason it's an excellent question is because i wasn't that guyon day, one who said o we, i can't wait to do this less of my life, because iwas running a punch press and i was dirty every day and all the clichesthat i'm trying to get people to not think about was actually what i wentthrough. You know i was programming on a one point floor, four megabyte andevery time i bring that up. Somebody else goes yeah, but you got to skip thetape programming. Yes, i did. I did get to skip the tape programming, but on anearly age you know we were on the you know, older machines and we were makingall of the offsets all of the program and all of the adjustments were just wetyped them in ourselves line by line until we really upgraded and startedusing excel. If that tells you how advanced that that company was at thattime, my passion for this compan of this, this industry came really muchlater. It was more of survival at the beginning right, ineeded a job and i needed to make more money, and then i needed to make moremoney, and then i because you know then families and then lifestyle and thatkind of thing so starting on a punch press. The first thing i ever did waspush two buttons on the right and left with both my hands. If i didn't, thenmaybe i you know, cut my finger off, so that was a safety measure. A piece ofplexi glass came down and it would punch a circular hole into a flat sheetof precious metal and that precious metal could have been gold, silver,palladium, platinum, whatever it might be. The first industry i worked in wasprecious metals, and while i was there, i always have i've always had thepassion to be successful right. It's not necessarily been a manufacturing tostart, but it was to do something cool to do something fun. So within thatcompany i said, how can i be the best version of myself that i can be, and idon't need to compete with the person next to me, the person who's been herefor a million years. I just need to be the best version of myself. How do i dothat? So i picked the highest senior programmer in our department and he waskind enough to teach me a lot of his wisdom of how to make edits and offsetsand programming understanding, g code and m code, and i ended up running thatdepartment after a while and while running that department. I also had thegreat opportunity to you know be a part...

...of company improvement committees, andthen there was this thing called. I think software which most peoplehaven't heard of, but most people have heard of six sigma. So if you think oflean manufacturing, five at six sigma is a lot of grass. It's a lot of chartsis a lot of theory of what we believe. I think software is where you take,that put it that algorithm into a computer and that computer willactually run that float chart to see if you're right to see if the bottle nextreally are whether it's supposed to be so. I had the great opportunity to bein charge of that to learn the lean manufacturing side of things. At thattime i had designed seven, i want to say seven different rings, which werepatented by the company, so my designs ended up being patented by that companyand it was really just an exciting thing. These different these differentaspects right, but it was a family owned company and at some point, whenyou can't grow anymore, you either start becoming stagnant or make a moveright, and i chose to make a move so from there i went into to steels and incanals and brass, and i it was the first time i ran a hoss machine and itaught myself how to run it. It was a vfx. I remember vividly and we wererunning you know, giant steel circular parts for the radiator coil industry tovery tiny parts as well, and it was a lot of drilling million. That kind ofstuff i burnt up a few in mills at that time. Figuring out, wait this! Thismachine is a little different than platinum. I know i might have beenconsidered it in a top five percent in the world of understanding how amachine platinum, but i'm probably in the negative five percent ofunderstanding how to machine steal. So, let's figure this out, so i had thegreat opportunity to steels and in canals and brasses and aluminum andplay in that world that didn't last too long, because the opportunity at thatplace it just the ceiling was low and i get bored easily. If i'm not learningso then i moved into the wood working world and helped run a machine shop.That was four acres and it was completely new machinery right. So iwas learning now on a conrad who i love those machines based in north carolina,so a router machine putting out the wood panels for doors for there istarted learning sanding lines and paint lines and all this other kind ofstuff and then somehow, through growth in that company, i ended up becoming aninterior designer believe it or not. Oddly enough, while working in theworld of woodwork e, we were building custom cabinetry for anyone, whether itbe kitchens living rooms bathrooms whatever it might be, and they saw, iguess a little bit of. I don't want to say, like a spark but drive. Let's saythere was always a drive to want to do more, and it wasn't that i wanted toleave the shop floor. I just wanted to learn more so a few small steps hereand there and i ended up being the right hand, man of the owner, and wewould have customers come in and i'm trying to try to describe this, so the listenerscan envision it right. So we're sitting in a conference room and thesecustomers come in. You know they're getting ready to build a hundred andfifty thousand dollar custom kitchen, because that's when the owner sits downright. So we have my laptop and connected to my laptop is a big monitorso that the customers can see the...

...screen while i'm designing it and i'msupposed to be able to design a kitchen as quickly as they can talk about it,which is what i figured out how to do so as quickly as you can say. I wantthis here and this here and this here boom boom boom. We were moving thisthing around and it was called cabinet vision, cabinet vision. Four point: oha really! Really a cool opportunity, but then i also started to realize outof going a full circle back to how you introduce this whole thing of i'vealways been stubborn, and i always want to do something that's going to make me happyand give back to others in a passionate way. So i put everything in a you hall.I left that job i drove south to florida because i wanted to live on.Vacation forgot to mention all of that was in the virginia dc area that i justtalked about drove down to florida, because i wanted to live on. Vacationhad no job no place to live. My wife was six months pregnant at that time wereally just wanted to live on vacation, and it took me eighteen twenty hours tomake the drive slept for about five hours took on three interviews and allthree companies hired me and the one that i took was air turbine technologyand for those people who don't know er ter bit technology. That was when i gotto learn micro machining. I mean the realm of ten thousand fifteen and amillimeter of forty sand or point zero, three n e n, they seven that was theworld i lived in for the last decade, which took me to see so many uniquepeople, and that was when that was when that connection joe. The the originalquestion you asked me before i had this really long, winded answer that i'mdoing right now. That is when i started to find apassion for the industry itself, because i saw the success that we werecreating for companies. The success that was being created created successfor the employees. The successful the employees meant that they could go homeand feed their family and not stressed about a job, and i started to see thisthis small picture. I was staring at a small screen and then it's like. I gotwings and i was able to look at a global version of what manufacturing anengineering actually can do to stabilize not just households which isincredibly important, but economies and- and you don't have to worry aboutnecessarily if we go to a there's, nothing against college, joe. Nothingagainst college. So let me echo that again for people who are going tocollege for parents who want their kids to go to college college is awesome.The experience is awesome. If that's for you do it, however, i would like tosay that it is very important for people to realize that you can go to atech school right now right now and you will walk out of that tech school witheither zero or very little student loans walking out of it. You'll goright into a job because there's a massive skills gap where you caninstantly make forty to eighty thousand dollars a year, and you have somethingthat you don't have to stress about not having tomorrow. This industry needsmore people and if we can convey these types of messages, then we're helpingand we're not just helping an economy...

...we're helping people were helpinghumans or hope by helping households to me that's what's so beautiful andamazing about it. I love that i love the passion. That's in your voice, it'sjust very clear that you know you really believe in what you're talkingabout and it's a good transition to a question. I wanted to ask you becauseyou know, like i mentioned at the very beginning here, i see your linked incontent all the time. You're, always curating videos and a lot of the thingsi see you post are you know, videos, your sharing that are then getting. Youknow thousands of views and hundreds of comments, but it's a lot of it ispeople who are doing good in the world through engineering and manufacturingand just for you know a couple examples these ones are. I think both you postedin the last week. Videos you shared one of them. I remember it was a it lookedlike maybe a six year old girl, i've got a six year old, daughter at home.So, like i see that and it hit home with me, but this is a six year oldgirl on a treadmill without fully formed arms or legs and she's runningon a treadmill with the help of manufactured limbs, and then there wasanother one. You posted it was a soon to be mom, who was blind and she'sholding a threed printed model of her ultra sound photo with, like you know,just tears in her eyes like that she can feel you know this baby in thispicture of of her baby. That is on the way, and so you know they're micro,examples of the good that engineering is doing in the world and themanufacturing, and so i would love for you to just kind of you know what is itthat inspires you to share this? What you talk about this topic ofengineering for good and why it's so important to you? It's really a greatquestion. Again. You you're fantastic at your podcasting brother and you'refifteen years in the making and what you're doing a h d event. Six i'd liketo say thank you to you as well, and to your team and allowing people to have avoice. You know we we a lot. Everyone has a story right and everyone wants toshare their story to people who actually listen. The problem is, mostof us, don't listen anymore. We always le. We either you know on our phones,looking down or ignoring people, or you know, we forget how important it is tolisten to one another. So thank you for doing what you're doing very much, andi mean that a lot i'm going to share a couple of stories with your brotherwhen i suffocated and when i lost a lot of people in my life, and i grew up notbeing the best version of myself at all. I was a trouble maker and, as i startedto realize in life this might sound a lot of you know, weird to our generalaudience, who's in manufacture and engineering, but i have both sides ofmy brain work actively all the time, the creative side with natural healingthe engineering syle with numbers and algorithms. So it's always constantlyworking, i'm always trying to figure out. How can i balance all of what iwant to be right so, due to my upbringing, let's say the way that igrew up and not being the nicest person. I feel like some of that carmack energybrought about some of the negative things in my life or less. I said,let's say, learning experiences because...

...nothing's really negative, it's justi'm either going to learn from it or it's going to be easy to get through.Let's make that choice, you know what i mean so due to that. I realized thatwhen i was kind or nice or cared about others,when i gave i received more every time i give i received more i'll, tell you.I wint tell you three stories and they're three quite simple stories, buti won t tell you three stories. First, one is. I was having a bad day. I wasin san francisco. I woke up grumpy. I had no idea why i just the day was crap.It was already crap. Maybe it was something i had done the day before.Maybe i didn't make a sale that i thought i was going to sell, but acustomer. Maybe i broke something i i don't remember, but i remember wakingup feeling like crap and i said what can i do well, i walked over to thelocal mcdonald's, not something i personally eat at, but something that'sinexpensive and can be shared. So i walked over to the local mcdonald'sabout fifty dollars worth of whatever their breakfast items. Were you knowigrant, muffins or whatever, and i walked around golden gate park and ihanded them out and with everyone i handed out the hugso, the joyeverything that came along with it. Just helped me feel happier and happierand happier so giving and receiving are absolutely symbiotic and how it works,and that was just one small example. Another time this guy had. He washaving a bad drug experience in southern california and he was freakingout and i went to get gas and he was i mean he was. He was struggling sweatinglike crazy, not a drug that i've ever participated in, but i recognize itbased on trying to do my best to help people on a regular basis right. Soi've seen these types of situations, he was scared for his life. He did notwant to be there. Nobody no way in the right mind was going to help the kid,but i let him get in my car and i drove him around for forty five minutes. Hedid not want to get out; he just wanted to be away from whoever he thought waschasing him, which was nobody, but that's what he thought. So i drove runfor forty five minutes. Listening to him, talk helping him go through hisbed trip, trying to offer him the most authentic and compassionate version ofmyself, so that he knew that when he left that car that everything was goingto be okay and after about forty five minutes, that's what it was. So i endedup dropping him off in a lighted area. I had never saw in a sense of course-and i didn't get his number anything, but as just an opportunity to face myown fears, which is at any point. This guy could hurt me right at any pointnow to the climax of the three stories as this last one joe you're, going tolike it, and actually some people on a show called hidden heroes, actuallyfound this story and interviewed me about six, seven, four, five, six seven!I don't remember a few years ago and i'm gonna preface this with my younger brother who's. Two yearsyounger than me ended up being diagnosed with schetinina burnt downour house when i was about twenty years old so when our house burnt down- and iknew that he had set ephron and he spent a year in jail- and i visited himall the time i started studying schizophonia. Well, what can i do tohelp? I mean that's my best friend, that's my is two years we grew uptogether. I love the kid freaking. What...

...do i do? You know there's no realanswers, but we're h. You know i'm homeless at the time, i'm sleeping inmy car, i'm very, very lucky, sleeping on the street song and i'm very, verylucky to have such beautiful friends in my life that i didn't stay on thestreets very long to that we crashed with their pads. So i'm grateful forthat. But what i learned was all the schizophrenia out there of allthe doctors out there less than two percent study schizophrenia and ofthose two percent there is no cure so for the rest of my brother's life, he'sgonna be shoved pills down his throat to become passive. So it doesn't burndown other houses and he's always going to hear the voices and see the visionsof what i believe to be a paniola chemical drip. Some people understandwhat d mt is some people don't, but it's a drip in our brain that helps usexperience, things that are outside of our third dimensional reality. That'snot manufacturing. So i'm going to skip path that part and use that for anotherpodcast, but it does segue into me understanding that about eighty percentof the people on the street right now that are homeless have some sort ofmental illness, and that could be gambling and it could be. You know somesort of it could be a lot of things right, but there's is some sort ofmental arness where they can't carry out a job. Some of it scams. It's notfor me to judge. I always want to help, but because i knew that situation and iwas in minneapolis minnesota, i walked out of a bar and for whatever reason,this homeless, guys sitting there. I was in whatever mood i was in, whichwas a good mood. It felt right to do everything that i could to take care ofthat person. So i asked that homeless person who i'd never met before if ye'dlike to crash for the next two nights in my hotel room, gave him my clothesgot him room service made sure he was warm brush his teeth. You know all thatkind of stuff. When i went to work during the day, i asked him to leaveand i would see him when i got back from work, but that also was one ofthose opportunities that i had where i was like. Okay, you know mental illnessis rampant with homeless people. You just invited someone in who could bevery similar to your brother without medicine, who could be very aggressive,so for me i wouldn't recommend it for other people, but for me i was in oneroom laying in my bed. He was on another room laying in the couch- and ihad a moment where i go is today going to be my last day. Isall my stuff got to get taken from me and nothing bad happened. It was justthis fear of creation that i was. I was building with them myself that wasn'treality. It could be reality, but it wasn't reality and so facing thesetypes of fears and helping these types of people. I want to do everything thati can to. I don't know subscribe is the right word or you know, just an filltrait some of the school. I want to provide a platform of knowledge so thatkids can have a future within an industry that is incredibly importantto the world and when they go home every day, they'll be proud of whatthey do o. So the short answer, which i...

...just gave you a very long, but theshort answer, is he: why do i care and why manufacturing is because i'vesuffered a lot, and i know what it's like to suffer. I want to give toothers and in the world we live in of manufacturing. I know that that's asolid platform for people to feel proud of themselves to feel grateful for whatthey do to feel grateful for what they built to say. I have this piece ofmaterial. In my hand, right now, there's piece of material cost metwenty five dolars. Now i can program something and cut some pieces where iturn this twenty five dollar piece of material into a thousand dollar pieceof art, and it's going to go on to a plane or it's going to go into themedical field. I want parents when somebody goes hey what your kid do. Ohmy kids, a pilot and they puff out their chest. Yeah we're proud of thepilots awesome we need you. I fly around all the time, but i also wantthe parent next to them to go well what your kid do puff out your chest. Sohe's an engineer. He helped build that plane. I want people to be equally asproud of the doctors and the people who are making the medical devices. I wantthat awareness to grow so that we're proud of each other for what we do.Love that message shone. I think it's really great. We need more people likeyou, spread in the word and painting manufacturing in a you, know, morepositive light and i've seen a lot of people talk about this from differentangles. You know the technology, that's that's available to people. Now, it'snot just dirty dark, dangerous jobs like there's, there's so muchinteresting things happening on the technology front. There are great jobsthat i mean you mentioned earlier to that are paying people well straightout of high school and, like college may not be for everybody, and thatdoesn't mean because you're not smart enough for bein, because maybe thatthat's just not the path that makes sense for you and it has nothing to dowith how intelligent you are or not, and- and i love the you know just that-your perspective on this- that you know you can do something meaningful andmake a difference of people's lives. That's kind of what i'm gathering fromthis from you and manufacturing is a great venue for making that a realityyeah whether you know at it i mean you know, and you mentioned earlier, thegirl that had you know not fully developed limbs and and the blind ladywho you know was able to get that thred print. There was one you know. I try toshare something like that, as often as like a monday motivational type thingright, because a lot of people want to see how cool the machines are. Theylove hearing the interviews from md holy crap that person just combinedthree operation to reduce to a cycle time by seventy five percent. How didthey do so? Obviously our industry needs that you know, but also from timeto time, let's realize what we're creating. Let's realize that. Oh didyou see that kid that cried when he got those contexts, because he was actuallyable to see color for the first time in his life? Did you see that kid whonever heard anything ever before pop that hyria e in his ear for the firsttime and cried because he could actually hear you know what i mean? Sothese are the things that we are creating the world of engineering. Wecan create anything, i mean we have...

...nature, we have air, we have you and mewe have people, but when you really think of it, we create almosteverything and we can absolutely destroy this world or we can make thisworld a incredible place. That's that's the creation of what we want to do andi just i'd love to be an advocate toshowcase people say you know what you want to do something in your life togive back to others. You can do that in engineering and while i see a lot ofsigns out there, you know saying heroes, work here and i want to give credit toall of our medical field. For the last you know a year and a half and ourdelivery drivers and our truckers and all these people who really you know,have done you know, been brave and gone out there and done what they'resupposed to do. I also think it's important that we recognize thatengineering didn't stop. Ventilators came from engineers mask come fromengineers. You know all of this stuff come from engineers and it takes apiece of ourselves to realize that and help express that to the world, because,while we love movies and tv shows- and these are our heroes- and thesemusicians were like i'm going to get away from my normal life and i'm goingto go to red, rocks out in colorado and i'm gonna watch michael france sing andi'm gonna, you know dance around yeah, that's awesome. We should support thattype of environment, but also, let's look at one another. Let's look at eachother, give each other a high five out or a giddy up, which i call a smack onthe bug, give him a giddy and say you know what you are awesome to look ateverything you've created. Let's, let's do these things, awesome man? Well, ilove the message. Tony think. It's really great. I appreciate you allow meto share it for share. Well anything anything. You want to say to put a bowon this. I think you did did a pretty job that already, but i want to openthe floor to you in case there's anything you want to add that i didn'task you about. Are we getting ready to close out this podcast? Already we'vebeen talking for three hours that may i talk a lot. Don't i three three hoursexactly on the don just kidding? Well, i guess just real quick. If it's okay,let's make sure that we're not crabs in a bucket for the people who arelistening out there. Yes, there's competition. Competition will make usbetter. Competition is important, but let's not yank each other down. Let'screate a platform where you can all we can all succeed. In my opinion, everymarketing company out there that would be quote unquote, competitors with md.Please don't look at yourselves that way. Please don't look at me that way.I'm not you looking at you that way. I want us all to bring awareness to thisincredible industry and if i may just touch on one last thing, the naturalhealing company that i started going back to helping people again wasstudying with herbalists the witch doctors and shamans and all my freetime as i traveled around the world. So there's a lot of secret healingbenefits to that, but i launched that company because i wanted to be able to give back to theearth and to people and to animals and anything that suffers so for not onehundred percent right now, but for a while for three or four years onehundred percent of the profits went to those in need. It went to give kids theworld a marine mamel center and to take...

...care of the amazon, and that's why itwas created, and i'm happy to say, since two thousand and fourteen so now,starting july tenth, we will open our first brick and mortar shop as we havepartner with the largest natural healing community in the entire countrycalled hypocrites here in west palm beach. So that is my conclusion brother.I appreciate you heavenly awesome man. Congratulations, that's! That's reallycool! Well, very good, tony good conversation again, i just love yourenthusiasm and passion and glad we got to get you up on stage here to let theworld see it so before we wrap it. I just want want you to tell our audience.You know we're going to go connect with you. How then learn more about whatyou're doing in all the the elements of what's going on in your life? Well, i'mpretty easy to find on linkedin that can obviously be best. Is there anytime i'm not going to shout out my phone number or my home address, but ido give it out regularly and my personal number is on my business part.So if someone sends me a message on linkedin and it's something that wewant to discuss over the phone or over zoom meeting, i am as authentic andtransparent and human with all of my flaws as i can be, and i am happy toconnect with anyone who wants to connect. Obviously, i have you know theinstagram as well and facebook, but i rarely use them as much as i do leak.Then i think linkedin is a powerful platform to connect with really youknow wise people in a situation that hasn't been watered down. Like some ofthe other platforms, i really value something like youtube and linkedin andthe algorithms that go along with it so that we're not just you know, yellingat each other over some silly opinion that we have t zero degrees in right.We don't we don't really know, but we definitely have an opinion about it. Soi enjoy linkin. So look me up there. I think my backslashes, you know linkedincom back slices, tony gun fourteen or something like that, but just look up,mdcccci global you'll find us, let's all be friends easiest way. I thinkawesome tony will thank you once again and as for the rest of you, i hope tocatch you on the next episode of the manufacturing executive. You've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools, specificallyfor b to b manufacturers at grilla. Seventy sicot a worn. Thank you so muchfor listening until next time. I.

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