The Manufacturing Executive
The Manufacturing Executive

Episode · 1 month ago

Starting Young: The Next Generation of Manufacturing & Engineering Talent w/ Meaghan Ziemba

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

What manufacturers should do is stop moaning about the lack of skilled talent and start partnering with grade schools (yes, as young as eighth grade) to show young people, especially young women, how amazing it is to build a career in manufacturing and engineering.

But how?

In this episode, I’m speaking with Meaghan Ziemba, Owner, Copywriter, and Copyeditor at Z-Ink Solutions and Host at Mavens of Manufacturing, about her calling to create an educational network to inspire youth to pursue manufacturing.

In this episode, we discuss:

- Meaghan’s career journey into marketing for manufacturers

- Strategies for attracting youth to manufacturing and engineering

- Creating a work culture to support women and parents

Check out these resources we mentioned:

- Meaghan’s podcast

- Meet the Makers tour

- National Association of Manufacturers (NAM)

- Technology & Manufacturing Association (TMA)

...

Subscribe to The Manufacturing Executive on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for The Manufacturing Executive in your favorite podcast player.

So I feel, like manufacturers, can stepup a little bit and maybe go to the high schools or even the middle schoolsand say: okay, where are your paying points? Where are you facing challengesto successfully teach these courses and how can we help? How can be invest sothat these are more successful? Welcome to the manufacturing executivepodcast, where we explore the strategies and experiences that aredriving midsize manufacturers forward here, you'll discover new insights frompassionate manufacturing leaders who have compelling stories to share abouttheir successes and struggles and you'll learn from BB sales andmarketing experts about how to apply actionable business developmentstrategies inside your business. Let's get into the show, it's no secret that hiring great peopleor, frankly, any people is harder right now than it's ever been formanufacturers. It's also no secret that if we don't get America's youthinterested in manufacturing and fast, the problem is only going to get worse.I guess today is a manufacturing mom. She is a high school age, daughter andshe's. An advocate for women in manufacturing she's also helping leavethe charge to reach today's youth and show them what a manufacturing careerpath could look like. This conversation was filled with some really smart andunique ideas for any manufacturing organization is feeling this pain andI'm excited to share them. So, let's get into it. Megan Zimba is a brandstory. Teller and marketer for manufacturers with a BA and ma inprofessional and technical writing. She's been writing for manufacturingsince two thousand and eight and hosts a live. Video broadcast series calledMavin's of manufacturing series focuses on women in the sector and its missionis to attract younger generations to join manufacturing or engineeringcareer pathways to help close the skills and gender gaps. Megan is aproud Leo wife and mother of three. She enjoys cooking cross fit and a GreatCup of coffee or a glass of Whiskey Maga. Welcome to the show. Thank you,John. How are you doing I'm doing? Well, I'm excited to have this conversationin a public facing way united, a great chat a few weeks ago and finally metafter I, I se you online. All the time we have a lot of common connections andcomment on each other's content and unlinked in and it's fun to. Actually,you know see you in the Flash, whilst you know through the computer of course,but so yeah. I'm excited about this conversation today, me too, when Ifirst heard about you were both from the marketing space yeah that in commonand some of their advice, I used in terms of marketing content that I'vecreated for other companies. So thank you for that. Hey you're! Welcome!That's great to hear, though I love you know. Sometimes you never know whatthings are resonating you do to an extent, but sometimes there people, youknow, reading your content or watching your videos, and then you hear it yearslater and it's like Oh that's, that's kind of its rewarding to hear that youknow had had some impact on somebody somewhere right, yeah, suddenly very cool, well Megan. It's very clear,as I think our listeners will soon discover. You've got a serious passionfor manufacturing. I love to hear kind of kick this off by hearing a littlebit about the journey that has led to you to where you are now so withmanufacturing. I accidentally fell in it into it. I wasn't intending to havea career manufacturing. When I was in high school, I was kind of lost. Ididn't really know what I wanted to do was really shy and the youngest of sixand my sister that's fourteen months older than me. She overshadowed me alast. She talked for me. She finished a lot of my sentences and it kind of mademe an introvert type personality. So by the time I got in a high school, youknow the biggest thing that my parents trying to instill in my brain was yougot to go to college and be an engineer or be a doctor or be a teacher or besomething that makes a lot of money,...

...and I just didn't really understand orget why. That was the thing. So I went to college against my own will I waskind of pressured it by my parents to go, and I almost blinked out twice ason academic provan. Partied, a lot really didn't care about. My classeswas in a depressed kind of state of mind, and then I got pregnant with mydaughter and I realized will craft. I need to get my stuff together and bethe role model that she needs, so she can be successful. So I moved back toWisconsin to live with my family, because her dad at the time decidedthat he wasn't ready to be a dad. So did the whole single mom thing and wentto the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and learned about technicalwriting. I always thought I was going to be like a poet or a creative writer,but then I learned about technical writing and the theory behind words andhow t people interpret it interpret them from different cultures ordifferent areas of the world, and it really interests me on how words canmake you know, accidents happen or build things that are complex. So whenyou think of a technical manual and it's a step by step process, you reallygot to understand how, when you use certainwords, it can direct somebody either to a disaster or to success, and it justwas really interesting to me. So that's what I went to school for and I use itnow to help manufacturers. You know, share their brand story, but stillmaintaining the technical jargon that they have for the components that thecreating but making it understandable enough for someone who might not be anengineering or manufacturing. So it's a really fine opportunity for me to learnabout technology and engineering and then write about it and get peopleexcited about it. So when people ask me, are you you know manufacturerengineered by trade? The answer is absolutely no. I was terrible at mathand science always like science, but never really could get involved withlike the formulations ips and memorizations and calculus was just adisaster to me. I still use my fingers to count and add his subtract, but yeahI fell into the by accident. My first job was working at a trade publicationand that's where I really started to learn about the passion that people putinto their work and the value that it provides. And if you're an engineer Idon't mean to offend but most engineers that I've met have been really sociallyawkward and don't really know how to like explain what they're doing, exceptin a technical way. So it was really fun to like crack those hard shells andreally get a deep understanding of why they chose this career pathway and whatreally excited them and then seeing their faces in like a finished storythat so their product and how it made a difference and them being really proudof. It really got me hooked into the industry, so I wrote for the tradepublication for about seven eight years and then I wanted to see. If maybe Icould try something else. So I wouldn't hire education and I really disliked it.It was not my cup of tea, and so I went back into manufacturing and I worked asa marketing person. I guess you could say, because there wasn't really onerole. I specialized in I was doing a lot of bunch o different things, so Iwas doing writing and video stuff and project management for trade shows andcommunity events, and really just helping manufacturers get their brandstory out there and connecting them with not just their customers but thecommunities that they were, that they were into, and you know having them have fun with what theywere providing to everyone in the world. So from there right before Covin hits.I've always had this idea to highlight...

...women in the sector because being awoman myself, you know, I know what it's like to be: The only girl in theroom, turing these conversations and kind of feeling out of place orintimidated a little bit, because no one was in the group that looks likethere wasn't any other female. So I wanted to highlight the women that Imet through engineering and manufacturing at these trade shows andgive them a platform where they consarn their stories. Because a lot of thepodcasts and news stories that I've come across that number one headlinerwas always a male which is hid. But you know, there's really amazing women inthe sector that are doing some awesome things and I just wanted to give themthat that light. So I decided to start main so manufacturing and a mission isreally too fold, so it's not to just provide women a platform to share whatthey're, proud of and what they're doing in the sector. But it's also aplatform. You know to attract younger generations of women into the sector.Right now, we're only representing like thirty percent, and I believe, that'sthe high end, I'm being generous by saying thirty percent. I think inactuality it's more like twenty seven twenty eight and I think we can dobetter. I don't know I'm a very competitive person, so I want to beatthe guys I want to have like maybe sixty seven percent or something likethat representation. So I started listening to my daughter'sconversations that she was having because she's graduating high schoolthis year and I started noticing that none of them were talking aboutengineering and manufacturing or anything really technical, and Iwanted to know why. So then I started digging a little deeper and I'm justnow trying to you know, use mamines as a platform. So women can, you know, beproud of what they're doing in the sector and then make those connectionswith a manufacturers and get younger girls excited about stem opportunitiesthat are out there and kind of encourage them to believe in themselvesand pursue something that they probably wouldn't normally pursue. If you know,someone like me, wasn't trying to put it in their face, so that's my journey.It's really long, winded, I'm sorry, I'm a writer so some in to talk a lot,but that's my attorney through manufacturing, and I how I startingevings thanks for sharing it. I think it's really interesting to hear how youknow one thing led to the next and and how you wound up where you are now soso Mavin's. I know you've got like a video series, we're interviewing,probably not too, unlike what I'm doing here, but in a very niched way withwith women and manufacturing. You have the video series and you're trying tobuild a brand, though this is more than just a video series. I know you've gotright now, you're planning an event which will have passed by the time.This goes live, but it's also, probably is not you know. Hopefully, right isnot a one and done thing to talk about the Mavis of manufacturing news to our,because I've heard I've. I've watched you planning this a little bit and seensome other people who are going to be involved and to talk a little bit aboutwhat that that is about what you're physically doing and what the missionis. So I wanted to really dive into wherethe challenges are. So throughout all of my conversations that I've beenhaving with manufacturers their number one challenge right now is trying tofind the right work force, talented work force. We have this skills gap,that's going on, but it's not just a skills gap, there's a generous gap andthere's also a diversity gap, and I wanted to learn why so I've been. Youknow trying to put myself in front of other people and connect with otherpeople that could really teach me where they're expertise are, and I made it apoint to visit my local high school, where I graduated from, and it wasreally exciting to see the excitement on the teachers, because I kind ofexplain to them why I wanted to come visit their techa department and what Iwas trying to do and they opened they...

...welcomed to me with open arms. Theywere just like absolutely, Yes, we need help, and so I went in there and ofcourse there was only one or two girls that I saw in all of their courses. Ithink total they might have ten or fifteen combined with all the coursesthat they offer, but still significantly less than the boys thatare in the classes. They're doing some amazing things with computerprogramming. They have CNC machines and one of their classes. They have a greatwelding classroom. They have a construction course where they'rebuilding frames of houses and learning how to like wire them correctly withelectronics. So there they're learning different skills, basic skills that arevery important if you want a successful career moving forward. So I really justwent there to kind of figure out where they're paying points were how theywere recruiting students to these courses, how they were havingconversations not just like the school counselors, but also the parents ofthese students, and then I really wanted to go in there and just ask thestudents themselves hey. Why did you sign up for this course? Is Engineeringand manufacturing something you're interested in? Has it been somethingyou were interested in? What do you like to do outside of school? Where hasyour curiosity come like? Where does it come from? What are you going to doafter school? What what kind of Carare you going for, and it was reallyamazing to hear the different responses, so most of the students really onlypicked the course because they needed something to spell out their schedule,which I that was kind of interesting. There were a couple that decided totake the course as because they knew the teachers that taught them andreally enjoyed those teachers, never had a class with them before just me,kind of outside and passing the hollies and stuff that to know them. So thatreally struck my interest to because it shows the importance of how mentors caninfluence someone to believe in himself and try something new and then a lot ofthem are like my mom or my dad wanted me to take this course or the counselorsuggested it. So I really started trying to connect the dots. I did talkto a high school teacher and another district in Illinois and you're on thephone with each other, and he was telling me how you know he has a bunchof seniors taking his level one welding class or CNC class and he's like thatdoesn't help me, because it's just something to fill up their time. It'snot enough to persuade them to pursue something in CNC. So he was saying thathe wanted to try to target eighth graders going into high school, and he-and I were China- brainstorm some ideas about how we can target eigth greater.So I wanted to use my platform and all of my connections that I've made onlike Ben and elsewhere. I'm really good at connecting people and talking topeople, and you know connecting dots that way. Just because of how manywriting assignments I've had. I have been able to keep a mental note of likeokay. This person works in this industry. This person needs this help,so maybe this person can help them and I try to connect those bridges. I'vealways been really good at that, and I've been really good with publicrelations to so I wanted to take that skill set that I have with all theconnections that I've linked in an elsewhere and see. If maybe I couldprovide this tour and really get different brands in front of kids andshow them what an actual career pathway looks like initially, I wanted to dofor the first part of the tour. I wanted to do a face to face facilitytour, but OVID has been thorn at everybody's thigh and a lot ofmanufacturing facilities who were...

...excited to do this or hesitate becausethey didn't want to be liable and case anybody got sick. So they were like.Please come back to us when Ovid has calmed down a little bit, because wedefinitely want to do this in the future, so they want to do the facilityto whereas they want to connect with these students and they want to startbuilding relationships. So I just didn't want to let kids down so for thefirst part of this tour. I I had to adapt and I turned it into US- going tothe high school and live streaming a bunch of experts than that I've gottento know fairly well over linked in and I'm so appreciative every single one ofthem because they all have busy schedules, but they know the value ofthis and they were like. Yes sign me up. How are we doing this? So I was able todo. A hybrid sort of conversation were Sante pre recorded videos, and thensome just came in at a scheduled time, the strame yard. So I want it to be bigger, though I don'twant it to just stop at my community. I want to provide a template to showother communities how easy this can be. All it takes is some time to pick upthe phone dial numbers and connect manufacturers with high schools andouter community. One of the things that I saw in like did that really got meexcited with little hilly. I don't know if everybody knows him, but he's on theAsie works with day left. He just posted Mita makers, tour which theyhave. This amazing decked out bus or trailer and they set stuff up in theparking live, is robotics its show emotion. Students were able to lookreally close at what they were doing and then they have a nice scape roomand it it teaches them about manufacturing an an escaper environment.That is awesome. So just things like that and that's a National Associationof manufacturers like NAM, that's doing that. I think right, yeah, yeah yeah. Isaw that as well. It looks really cool who knows to them like that. That'sawesome and that's the next level that I want to bring this to. I want to. Iwant kids to connect with manufacturers and get excited about what they'redoing so that they know if you're not going to math or science, that's okay,there's other places and manufacturing that you might sit in like cad design.You could do that, but I also want to show them that you know if you'reinterested in the medical industry, that doesn't necessarily mean you haveto be a nurse or of surgeon. You can create robotics that do operationsremotely or you can work for an additive manufacturing company whospecializes in prosthetics for different types of people or you canwork with robotics, because right now, that's a big thing to where they'retrying to make robotic prosthetics for people and I've seen a couple of theconcepts that are coming out. They're super super cool, the wiring class thatthis construction class that I met previously with they can use thoseskills to Huk out machines, CNC machines or the robotics that are goingto you know automate factory processes. They can use that skill to do that sortof thing. Another area where there's a huge need is welding and a lot of thesecourses are teaching the basic levels of volting. Okay. Well, let's show themwhat that actually looks like you're, not just going to be welling, thesesmaller components, there's big things out there that need certified, talented,well, there's! So let so, let's show them that shift carrier or let's showhim that going airplane and let's show him, you know, whatever other giantcomponents are out there that need really fine welling so that it doesn'tkill anyone. Let's do that. So that's what I want to take this. I want to tobe able to get students excited. There's still did they were to Startiand I think the younger the better, but...

I know that there's some restrictionsand safety concerns when you bring kids that aren't sixteen or above in no setfactory setting. So I think that's another challenge that we need to likethink creative ways of how to work around, because I mean I don't knowabout you but myself. My curiosity was that it's pet. When I was a young kidlike and you have children, I have children they're curious creatures.They want to know how stuff works. They want to know why it works the way theyalways ask. Why, and I think the younger we start and nurture thatcuriosity. Through the time there in high school have a better chance ofgetting them into manufacturing and engineering crew pathways, I thinksomething. That's really smart that you just said. Megan kind of just lightball went on for me. I don't know what the execution looks like, but when youtalked about how three D, printing or additive might be used in the case of aprosthetic arm or welding, as an application in you know, helping puttogether an airplane right and like make sure people are safe in thatsetting, and so the things I just wonder what what can peoplemanufacturing, who are trying to reach the youth due to make a connection tosomething that they know like something that is like real in their world, sothat welding or you know machining or fabrication, isn't just the sort of youknow this concept that really doesn't have any meaning in their life? How doyou create a connection to their world yeah? It's not, and I think that'swhere high schools are struggling right, because they're only allowed so muchdepending on what state you're in the legislation is going to be differentand the funding is going to be different. So in Wisconsin, the teacherthat I was speaking with she told me she was like part of our budget got cutand was allocated somewhere else, so that just hurt us even more becausesome of the materials that we need to actually do these courses or the hourswe need to for the teachers to actually teach the courses that got cut so she's,like it really put us in between a rack and a hard place and she's like there'sonly so much funding to that goes in the grants and scholarships and thingslike that. The construction teacher. He was telling me that his budget wentfrom nine thousand to els fifteen sand and it's because of the supply change,disruptions that are going on and just the availability of materials and howquickly they can get the materials and some of that he took out of his ownpocket like because he wanted the kids to still be able to learn what he wastrying to teach them. So I feel, like manufacturers, can step up a little bitand maybe go to the high schools or even the middle schools and say: okay,where are your pain points? Where are you facing challenges to successfullyteach these courses and how can we help how can be invest so that these aremore successful? Another big thing is like field trips taking kids when I wasin seventh grade, we went to a park and we learned about biology elements byvisiting the park will and why not learn about trade elements that aremanufacturing elements by going to a manufacturing poor, which was myinitial goal for me. If it's a manufacturing, I wanted to bring thesestudents not just a one facility, but some multiple within their community,so they knew where you know a lot of these opportunities were coming from,because there is a report out there that for every manufacturing job thereis, it actually creates around three or four more in your outer community, andthat includes like grocery clerks or anchors or automobile places like itcreates that economic stability to support other business infrastructure.So it's really important, I think, for kids to know yeah. Our community is theway that it is because of the success...

...or not so successful, manufacturingcompanies that are here not here, and I think it's important to connect thatdot too. So I think, if manufacturers, you know, found creative ways, becausethey do a lot of marketing rate. They do a lot of investment in these tradepublications, and I know I'm probably going to upset some of the Trade PublicHesione. But that being part of my background, Iknow that some of these ads that they're promising great leads from doesn't happen all the time. So, instead of the investing in aprinter that maybe twenty people might see, start investing in your communityand investing in ways to market to your community and save some of the budget.For that I know a lot of manufacturers who get involved with first roboticsand what they do is depending on what I don't want to say what mission theyhave like set standards every year, like it's a different type of projectevery year for first robotics so like if you're a components, company, don'teat parts to help them build the robots and don't look for any kind of RoiReturn, just donate the part say yes, this is here, and you know the schoolpromotes it in some land. First for Bats, have the school say: Yeah we'responsored by this company, and they provide us this perks. I think that's agreat way and what it does to is. It puts your brand in front of the kidsyou're helping the kids have fun, so the kids are going to remember. Thisbrand is super cool because it helps us build this robot. It's fun: I'm goingto connect the a Salle, it's like with any memorable brand like a lot ofpeople, Remember Nike, because you know how they did their branding a lot ofpeople. A lot of the students know they are not pale. A lot of these studentsknow has because has does that same exact thing. They insert themselveseverywhere. They provide training, they provide technical support. They justare part of the conversation. So when you're, a student and you're workingwith that machine, you're going to remember that when you lean and that'sany time you hear the word CNC machine and you're to think of pass right away.So I think more brands need to just start doing that, and it has excited alittle bit sooner before they decide. You know what course they have to takesenior year before it's too late, yeah good stuff. There look, let's do alittle brain storm here, Megan. Let's try to get the tactical formanufacturing people who are listening right now. So I'm thinking of like whatrole can a manufacturer play with a high school or a trade school or peck?Seventh or eighth graders or whatever, like you, know, I'll leave it up to youdo to where you wor. You want to talk about this, like you've talked aboutfield trips, to facilities right, open up your facility bring people in. Letthem see how interesting you know things are that are going in there. Letthem see the technology that that's present from robotics to you knowconnected factory stuff industry for point o technology like there's so manyinteresting technology, the technological advancements happeningand manufacturing right now, and that I think, would be super appealing to alot of youth that they would never know as there so bring kids into facilitiesright, put machines in schools. You mentioned first robotics and Hoss asexamples. The House is obviously a major like a household name, a hugecompany, but you know what kind of small manufacture learn from that, andI I'm just trying to think of what else. What else can you field trips machinesin schools like how about teaching like being an ad junk teacher? You said youknow so many manufactures throw money at trade pubs and what is that reallygiving you? Could you invest some of other resources like the time of someof your people in in helping teach in a school or right curriculum, or do somerecorded courses like people are doing for you, your Maven tour right you andthen that stuff is, can be reused. I just got to thinking a lot, but whatelse can I manufacture do to help in the schools? I was. I brought upteaching specifically because when I...

...was talking to some of these tecoteachers from the high school that I graduated from, there is so we all knowabout the grave waves that's happening in manufacturing. That's not the onlyplace that it's happening or losing a lot of teachers to and they're being,it's very difficult to replace them, especially in tact education. When Iwas talking to the welder teacher, he was like. We use this platform that distributes you know all thepositions in the local area for techa teachers and he is like before I wasonly like. Maybe two or three positions were available and I think he saidthere was like twenty of me. Wilen or thirty, I think is like some of themhave been available for the last few months. We cannot find teachers fortech, education, any more one of the teachers that I spoke with. WHO WASTEACHING CNC? He was actually retired, he retired from Woodward Arrow spaceand he was a CNC machinist and his friend worked at the same high schooland was saying yeah. We need help, we don't have anyone, that's you knowcertified and seeing C machining, I know, is kind of work, the machines andhe is like well I'll, do it, but he was already retired and now he's planningon retiring and den. It only teaching part time. So I think offering yourresources as a small to medium size manufacturer to maybe take someone andgo teach a class. You know out of an hour a day how long are high schoolclasses. I've been out of high school, so I I don't even remember along. Theyare, but just you know, go in and teach them how you are using. Your skillswithin your own facility and then they'll make that connection to youlike. Oh, this is how they do it and it would be a lot easier for them to tosign up for imprentit or internships that you might have and you're alsocreating a mentor for that group of kids. So it's like you're killing,multiple birds, withjust one stone, some other things are donating if youdonate materials machines or even money, don't e, because a lot of these typesof courses are lacking finding or if you have an organization that areconnected to like National Association of the factures or the TA or there's somany with so many different acronyms if they have like a scholarship program orsomething don't eat to that connect with these smaller organizations thatare trying to advocate for manufacturing and engineering and seewhat type of events they're holding see, what type of scholarships they have andget involved, make those connections another one that I thought would becool. So when I was in high school and there they still do it now- and I onlyknow this because my daughter is in high school, but they have homecomingparades and they actually have kids on a committee that make folds it would be super cool if amanufacturing company then knew how to make like moving parts. How create likethis- and this is something I just thought of today when I was thinkingabout this- this interview like take part in that flip, making design. I betyou could come up with some really awesome float and the kids would havefun. They could ask questions about your products or your processes, andthen they can show it off to the rest of the city when you have your owncoming Brad, so just doing stuff like that sponsorship facility tours getinvolved in any kind of activity, so October is national name factoringmonth. The first weekend is always manufacturing. The first Friday isalways manufacturing day. What can you do to highlight your products andprocesses on that specific day? And how can you invite your entire community toget involved? Throw a barbecue? You know do something creative, it'snot that hard to get kids excited. I...

...don't think, like my kids are alwayswanting to get in some kind of trouble, not like bad trouble but like get intosomething so make it productive connect, maybe with police departments or firedepartments. There's manufacturing in the trucks that they're using in thecars that they're driving, especially now with all the advanced technologiesthat are making cars, be able to track things up. My husband's a policeofficer and one of the things that they have in the police, cars are cameras,track people's feeds and they can read the license plate and take pictures ofit and stuff. So, like just cool stuff like that, like get involved with it,so I'm rambling, I'm sorry! No, no! Here's a lot of great ideasthere. I think it's awesome. I would imagine people are listening right nowand, like I really hope some light bulbs are kind of going on for peopleto you know physics just spurs other ideas, because I think you said it. Yougot to be creative and just kind of think a little bit differently abouthow you can reach youth and get involved. It's probably not as hard asyou might think. Yeah I mean I understand with manufacturers. Yourcustomers should be your number one priority, but with all the skills gap, issues that were facingyou're not going to have any customers, if you can't produce your product, sowe kind of need to balance it out a little bit and really figure out. Okay.How can we- and you know the industry of robotics and automation- issomething that's really fascinating to me, because it is able to fill some ofthose positions that are having a really hard time, finding skill talentfor it, which I think is amazing and I think it intimidate some people,because the misconception is well they're, going to take all the jobs andthat's just not true. If anything, it's going to provide an opportunity tocreate more jobs that we didn't even think of. So it's great that we haverobotics and Atonatiah to help. You know kind of cushion the lack of skill Labor that we areexperienced right now, but we are still going to need human bodies andmanufacturing facilities and positions, and we can't do it unless we startupskilling some of the current workers so that they can do some cross trainingand multitask or get these Yar kids excited and get them into themanifactur Megan less shift gears here from them. We've talked a lot aboutgetting youth involved, you're a mom and a woman in manufacturing- and Iknow big party. Your mission at Mavin's is empowering women in the sector andputting it shutting a light on them and trying to you know, make this a moreappealing workplace for women from your own personal experiences or those thatyou've observed by talking to other women in manufacturing and specificallymanufacturing MOMS. What do you think that companies s in this sector can bedoing that? Maybe they're not right now to help someone like you find a balancethey want in their life, so we can attract more women into thissector. So really, I think it's depending on the type of position,because I'm a writer and I'm mostly in the marketing to permit which can beaccommodated by you, know remote work and that's pretty much. I don't want to say that I'm happy theband of a cabin, because it was a terrible thing, but it did really openup a lot of people's eyes on understanding how easy it is to letpeople work from home, and I think that is a blessing, especially to parents,because it's hard having kids and having maybe gone all day at anotherlocation, because in case this an emergency happens or whatever you wantto always be right there to respond right away manufacturing. You do havethe requirement of having, especially if you're, on the shot floor. You haveto be there in case something bad...

...happens on the shop for. So how can wework around? You know, because a lot of women, I think, are afraid to pursuecertain careers in manufacturing. Because of that requirement of havingto be present, I did speak to a woman in Illinois. She is actually considering and she was supposed to beon Maman's, but I hand to cancel a couple times and I'm still trying toreschedule her, and I want to follow up with her on this, but she wasconsidering bringing in a day care and building one on sight so that themachinist to were women could still come to work as their kids there and ifanything happened, they were right there on location with their kids. Ithink that's super awesome, especially considering how expensive day care is.It's ridiculous and I think that's a creative way that manufacturers canalso consider taking on some of that financial responsibility. So if a momdoes want to work, a lot of it does have to deal wit. I don't havechildhood care, so I can't really go on a shot, fuller and work all hours ofthe day and day care. Is that cheap? I'm sure you know it's prettyridiculous in my area and I'm very blessed to have my mom and five othersiblings that can help when they have time to. But you know if none of themare available. I have to take off work or my husband has to take off workbecause we're not going to put money towards toys as it's just ridiculous.So if there's a way to maybe compensate for some of the cost, I don't thinkanyone would have a problem taking a little pit on their salary a lot oftimes. People you know, demand high salaries, because it's helping them payfor something else, whether it's travel or living expenses, or you know, ChildDay care so manufacture, is that can find creative ways to have those flaxhours, I think, is important to so. If people want to work on Saturdays orSundays, so that they can take one day out of the week off, why not as long asthey're creating the product and getting it done again. This is me notbeing aware of any kind of standard that might be out there. That says youcan't do that, but why not allow people to work weekends if they need two daysout of the week off. I think that would help balance things out the TA. Theyare a great organization and they actually created a grant for women whoare already in manufacturing and engineering, and they can use thatgrant for whatever they want. So, if you apply for this, I think thestandard is, as you need some sort of management to approve the applicationas well too, so that they have that secondary resource to say yes, this iswhat they're going to use it, for they can use it for whatever they want. Soif they need new materials that they need new tools if they want to getcertified like a next level, certification of where they're at it,where they're at it pays for their schooling or if they mean extra moneyfor child care, they can use it for it. There's no questions as they just haveto go through an application process, and I think that's really cool, and Ithink, if you know manufacturers can provide some creative ways. A lot morewomen would be interested in entering entering the sector. I talked to astudent. She was actually a one of Andrew Crowstudents and she wasn't approached by Andrew. Herboyfriend actually was, but she was the one that showed up to the class and shesaid she's like I'm, I'm a single mother. I have a daughter. I want herto know that you know there's ways of making good money and she's like this,makes really good money and before she even graduated, she had like three orfour Jamais and she was willing to work because it was going to help her be abetter mom, Tor, a king, and so she was able to work some agreements out whereshe could pick her hours or something...

...like that. So just something as simple as that, whereit helps you know them be a better mom, but also helped them be a better worker.I think that is a win win for everyone. When you, when you have a work culturethat shows your employees, that you know they are valuable to you, they'regoing to do a better job, they're going to like working with you, they're notgoing to want to leave, and nowadays you know with the new generationscoming in, they kind of they know their value. They know whatthey want, they know what they like. So if they end up in a company, that's notreally going to be accommodating to what they think is what they deserve.They're going to go, find somewhere else to work, because I think it'sreally important for manufacturers to just kind of think of creating wayslike maybe adding a day care to the facility or providing flex hours or adding more sixdays. I know there's manufacturers out therethat still don't offer maternity leave, which was really crazy to me orpaternity leave. So why? Why not like it just doesn't make sense to me sojust hearing your employees and hearing what their needs are and then seeingwhere you can make adjustments to make it more enjoyable, because there'sstudies out there that happier, employees are the better the workthey're going to do and the more productive they're going to be so I don't know, there's places in Europe.They only work thirty hours a week which blows my mind and they stillproduce a lot of product and it kind of makes me wonder like why? Aren't weadapting that? The last of a year, yeah well in probably some peoplelistening right now we're thinking you well yeah, but there's a cost all thisright. But you know what what's the cost of not having somebody on amachine. That's sitting there not operating, because you can't findsomebody to run it. What's the cost of employee turnover? What's the cost thatyou don't see on a spreadsheet and your pl of unhappy employees who bring downculture and productivity and drive other people away earlier, because it'sa miserable place to work, and so I'm talking in extremes here. But I thinkyou need to look at when you're, really looking at the true cost of some ofthese things, you're suggesting what look at the alternative to the wholecomments of. Oh, this all comes out of cost yeah, but okay, how much of a cost,though? So, if you're a manufacturing company- and I am willing to work withyou, but my one stipulation that I'm looking for is some sort ofcompensation or day care and then you're like well. If we pay for daycare and then we're going to have to cut your salary vis, therin percentage,okay sold like I'm fine with that, I have a range for a reason. Like you know, people say theirsalaries been arranged for reason. It's because they're allocating all of thesecosts that they're thinking about that can help them live the life that theywant to live. So, if you're taking on some of that responsibility- and itmeans okay, my salary isn't going to be. You know at that point, but it's stillwithin my range. That was fine with me. One of the things that I enjoy doing isworking from home, I'm more productive because I'm a writer from home. So I'mdefinitely on board. You know and I don't want to say, taking a pay cutbecause I don't think it's taking a pacon. I think it's a compromise, I'mwilling to compromise some of my salary if I can work a certain amount of digsat home and I can choose my hours and I think that that's okay. So if, ifthere's employees that are willing to work Saturdays and Sundays, because twodays out of the week like the week days, they need to be president for theirkids, because their significant other is working to okay, then let them workSaturday and Sundays if they can only work from like four o'clock in themorning to twelve, which I think is crazy, because there's actually peoplethat get up at three o'clock in the...

...morning go work it for in the morningif they can only work from four o'clock in the morning to twelve, becausethat's what their schedule allows the. Why not as long as they're producingand they're happy and it's helping the company grow. I thinkthat should be considered. You know we have third sift people all the time. Soif someone wants to work a different hours of the day, I don't know butagain, I'm not a top level executive making these decisions. So I don't knowwhat the process or the snars are. Well, I think ideas from all sorts ofdirections are valuable, so I think that a think you've had a lot ofrelease planted a lot of really good seeds for people to think about here. Thank you. Well Magan. We couldprobably talk all day. I know we could we kind of have already, but I want toput a wrap on this here. So any parting words or or you know, if you had tosummarize any bits of advice, you'd have for manufactures listening outthereo. Anything else, you'd want to add here. Yes, I think manufacturing isan essential component of our economic stability, and you know back in theforties. It was something that brought us all together and we were very proudof it and I feel like there are a lot of good companies out there and a lotof good people making amazing things, and we still be very proud of it, andwe should help support it in any way that we can. So if it means taking sometime and going to talk to kids or students or donating. I think we shoulddo it because it's important and it gives us something to stand behind. It-gives us something to be proud of, and if you're a woman- and you don't knowwhat you want to do for the rest of your life. I highly suggest lookinginto this section, because there are so many amazing women already within thesector that are doing amazing things and it is a great opportunity toproblem solve multitask and just make really good money to live a great life.So don't be afraid of it. Don't be afraid that, right now there aren't asmany women and yeah, let's just boost those numbers of, because I'm reallycompetitive, and I just want to beet the guys fair enough. I, like it Megan,well, really appreciate you doing this today. This was a lot of fun and I lovethe message that you know you're kind of broadcast in here to the world. Socan you tell our listeners where they can learn more about what you're doingand about Maben of manufacturing as well yeah? You can check out LinkedinI'm on there, I'm also on you toe and all the other social channels, but Ihave a website. It's moving, some manufacturing com, beautiful megan,thanks for joining. I appreciate you taking time out of your day for thisthanks. So much John Appreciate it awesome. As for the rest of you, I hopeto catch you and the next episode of the Manufacturing Executive you've been listening to themanufacturing executive podcast to ensure that you never missed an episodesubscribe to the show in your favorite podcast player. If you'd like to learnmore about industrial marketing and sales strategy, you'll find an everexpanding collection of articles, videos guides and tools, specificallyfor B tob manufacturers at gorilla. Seventy SICOT Ashalorn. Thank you somuch for listening until next time.

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